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Mten3 as first EUC?

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Posted (edited)
18 minutes ago, tenofnine said:

Eh....a thin 14 inch tire is going to fair much better against potholes than a wide 10 inch tire. You will feel every sidewalk crack on the Mten3 that you won't feel on an IPS i5.

I personally would go with V5F over both these options considering his needs.

It's like saying 28" road bike is better than MTB 26" for taking potholes :facepalm

Here comes also greater power and battery plus wide tyre, albeit shorter ;)

 

On 11/13/2017 at 7:47 PM, houseofjob said:
  • IMHO (at my rider weight of 170lbs) both Luffy & i5 are extremely underpowered, requiring ideal street conditions.
  • Even small bumps and grooves (ones that you would not think twice on for regular EUCs) require (for me at least) slight jumping off the pedals because both Luffy & i5 again are very underpowered. I had a fall on a small sidewalk curb dropoff because the EUC could not sustain my weight plus the rebalancing on the minor drop
  • ...
  • The MTen3 is night and day different in performance than the Luffy or i5; really can stand on it's own as a full-blown wheel due to the wide 3" tire (albeit you need to be careful just on big divots). The Luffy and i5 are really more specialty wheels, whereas the MTen3 is a legit, full EUC.
  • IMHO, the ~6.5 lb tradeoff in weight between the i5 and MTen3 is not worth it, especially if you're open to attaching the external trolley. I wasn't in love with having to worry about every single crack riding on the crappy streets of NYC, whereas the MTen3 I ride amongst stop-and-go car traffic at times.
  • Though I have not had the parts to try it yet, the MTen3's ability to go tubeless furthers it's value IMHO, as having a wide tire that can be pumped at a lower tire pressure but retain all the shock absorbing properties of a higher PSI is invaluable. AFAIK the thinner Luffy & i5 tire sizes have no tubeless options. Tubeless also means no annoying pinch flats.
Edited by LucasD
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1 hour ago, LucasD said:

It's like saying 28" road bike is better than MTB 26" for taking potholes :facepalm

Here comes also greater power and battery plus wide tyre, albeit shorter ;)

 

Yea that's a horrendous analogy.

A road tire is SIGNIFICANTLY thinner and smaller to the point of almost having no innertube, you are basically riding on the rim.

Then to compare a 26 inch to a 28 inch

and then a 10 inch to a 14 inch...that's a mistake.

At the lower tire sizes every inch increase  is exponentially more effective and noticeable....you change your MTB tire from a 26 inch to a 28 inch and you won't even notice it....same if you increased all your car tires by 2 inches. Not only that but you are comparing 2 inch difference to 4 inches....almost half the entire Mten3 tire size diameter.

I've ridden an Mten3 10" in Chicago, then compared it to my V5F 14" .....have you experience with these EUCs or tire sizes?

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, tenofnine said:

Yea that's a horrendous analogy.

A road tire is SIGNIFICANTLY thinner and smaller to the point of almost having no innertube, you are basically riding on the rim.

Then to compare a 26 inch to a 28 inch

and then a 10 inch to a 14 inch...that's a mistake.

At the lower tire sizes every inch increase  is exponentially more effective and noticeable....you change your MTB tire from a 26 inch to a 28 inch and you won't even notice it....same if you increased all your car tires by 2 inches. Not only that but you are comparing 2 inch difference to 4 inches....almost half the entire Mten3 tire size diameter.

I've ridden an Mten3 10" in Chicago, then compared it to my V5F 14" .....have you experience with these EUCs or tire sizes?

V5f is different to i5.

i5 is 1.5" wide tyre, v5f is 2.125", and mten3 is 3"

So approximate torus volume mten3 155, v5f 132, i5 69... (I used that tyre width is perfect circle, which is not true, so v5F would probably get more volume, still i5 would lag behind both)

 

Look at photos i5 vs v5f  https://www.ewheels.com/product/new-ips-i5-245wh-feather-weight/

Edited by LucasD

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A onewheel's dinky go kart wheel has 4x the torus volume of an Mten3 tire.... but hit a 4-5 inch pothole and you are going flying.

According to your wacky logic an Mten3 can roll over larger potholes than a V5F?

Also using your logic a onewheel is safer to go over potholes than pretty much every EUC including the massive Monster 22"?

keanu-woah.jpg

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Where I say mten3 is superior to v5f? v5f is normal sized EUC so will have advantage over mten3, the same as v8 vs v5f.

 I only said it is better than i5, whereas you clearly state i5 is better. But i5 has very thin tyre just 1.5" vs standard 2.125"

I also posted for you eyes a highly reliable review of a guy (houseofjob) that had a lot of wheels including i5, luffy and mten3...

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5 hours ago, tenofnine said:

Eh....a thin 14 inch tire is going to fair much better against potholes than a wide 10 inch tire. You will feel every sidewalk crack on the Mten3 that you won't feel on an IPS i5.

I personally would go with V5F over both these options considering his needs.

I've ridden the i5. It's a super cool wheel due to it's size (extremely thin) and low weight. But it feels like it would self-destruct if you hit a pothole. I would only ride one where the pavement is always smooth.

I think the i5 is truly a last-mile wheel designed for ideal conditions.

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V5F looks promising, I'm going to give it some strong consideration. How does it do going up hills? 

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1 hour ago, Marty Backe said:

I've ridden the i5. It's a super cool wheel due to it's size (extremely thin) and low weight. But it feels like it would self-destruct if you hit a pothole. I would only ride one where the pavement is always smooth.

I think the i5 is truly a last-mile wheel designed for ideal conditions.

I don't disagree at all. 

Both the Mten3 and i5 are bad choices for commuting on rough roads.

 

1 hour ago, JonasInn said:

V5F looks promising, I'm going to give it some strong consideration. How does it do going up hills? 

Very well. It has a lot of torque for it's wattage rating. I've been able to cruise up steep parking structures that exceed the incline rating. Somehow the V5F motor can peak at 1900-2000W, I've seen it happen a few times while logging my rides over the past few months. Not sure if that number in the app is true but it feels like it always has power to give.

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7 minutes ago, tenofnine said:

I don't disagree at all. 

Both the Mten3 and i5 are bad choices for commuting on rough roads.

 

Very well. It has a lot of torque for it's wattage rating. I've been able to cruise up steep parking structures that exceed the incline rating. Somehow the V5F motor can peak at 1900-2000W, I've seen it happen a few times while logging my rides over the past few months. Not sure if that number in the app is true but it feels like it always has power to give.

Just to clarify for others. The Mten3 is not ideal for rough roads because of the small diameter tire, but it's a little tank of a wheel with extreme power. The i5 is a weak wheel that will self-destruct.

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8 minutes ago, Marty Backe said:

Just to clarify for others. The Mten3 is not ideal for rough roads because of the small diameter tire, but it's a little tank of a wheel with extreme power. The i5 is a weak wheel that will self-destruct.

My other issue with the mten3 is that all that weight on one small tire seems to be prone to blowouts and pinch flats. Just from watching many others on it your experience does not seem to be unique concerning the tire failing with just everyday riding. But that could be other factors at play, I'm going on pure speculation and 2nd hand observation concerning longevity of the mten3 with stock parts.

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2 hours ago, Marty Backe said:

Just to clarify for others. The Mten3 is not ideal for rough roads because of the small diameter tire, but it's a little tank of a wheel with extreme power. The i5 is a weak wheel that will self-destruct.

The Mten3 is a piece of cake on rough roads compared to it’s sister Luffy. ;)

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2 hours ago, tenofnine said:

My other issue with the mten3 is that all that weight on one small tire seems to be prone to blowouts and pinch flats. Just from watching many others on it your experience does not seem to be unique concerning the tire failing with just everyday riding. But that could be other factors at play, I'm going on pure speculation and 2nd hand observation concerning longevity of the mten3 with stock parts.

There's no way you would get a pinch (snake-bite) flat on the Mten3 unless you were running at extremely low pressure. And of course most Mten3 are tubeless which makes that impossible.

I have hundreds and hundreds of miles on my Mten3. By and large, it's a very reliable wheel. You must experience the joys of riding one to understand. But if you haven't I get your skepticism. It's not a wheel for everyone.

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Posted (edited)
6 hours ago, Marty Backe said:

There's no way you would get a pinch (snake-bite) flat on the Mten3 unless you were running at extremely low pressure. And of course most Mten3 are tubeless which makes that impossible.

I have hundreds and hundreds of miles on my Mten3. By and large, it's a very reliable wheel. You must experience the joys of riding one to understand. But if you haven't I get your skepticism. It's not a wheel for everyone.

I only got to ride a mile or 2 on one in Chicago, the Mten3 was actuallly the first I found out about EUCs through someone I knew in real life. After I got my V5F and could ride I met up and tried it out.

It's a mind reader and it's very fun (I almost bought one before the ewheels price increase instead of the Tesla) but at anything higher than my 13-14 mph I felt very uneasy on rough unpredictable roads. I would get caught up on small curbs and such. It's a very physical wheel I found you need to pay attention and move your weight up and down more to get over urban obstacles. I found myself riding with a more bouncy cadence and posture since it had so much torque and agility. The grinding whirring sound kind of turned me off though, I know the wheel could handle me but still the sounds were making me worry (I know I know small wheel, so much power, it's going to make more noise...).

Edited by tenofnine
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4 hours ago, tenofnine said:

I only got to ride a mile or 2 on one in Chicago, the Mten3 was actuallly the first I found out about EUCs through someone I knew in real life. After I got my V5F and could ride I met up and tried it out.

It's a mind reader and it's very fun (I almost bought one before the ewheels price increase instead of the Tesla) but at anything higher than my 13-14 mph I felt very uneasy on rough unpredictable roads. I would get caught up on small curbs and such. It's a very physical wheel I found you need to pay attention and move your weight up and down more to get over urban obstacles. I found myself riding with a more bouncy cadence and posture since it had so much torque and agility. The grinding whirring sound kind of turned me off though, I know the wheel could handle me but still the sounds were making me worry (I know I know small wheel, so much power, it's going to make more noise...).

Yes, the Mten3 makes lots of grunting noises, but it's never failed me or anyone as far as I know.

It's not a wheel for going fast. Yep, anything above 15 gets sketchy.

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On 11/05/2019 at 02:54, Marty Backe said:

Je connais personnellement quelqu'un qui a spécifiquement acheté le MCM5 afin de pouvoir le mettre dans son sac à dos et le transporter. Je l'ai vu porter. Cela pourrait valoir la peine d'être envisagé. Une roue super puissante et sûre. Grande poignée de chariot aussi.

Hello, what type of backpack ? 80L ? haha :)

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6 hours ago, kelec_947 said:

Hello, what type of backpack ? 80L ? haha :)

I don't know if you seriously want to know the answer, but @maltocs posted pictures of the actual backpack here, along with the brand and model. It works much better than you may think.

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3 minutes ago, Marty Backe said:

I don't know if you seriously want to know the answer, but @maltocs posted pictures of the actual backpack here, along with the brand and model. It works much better than you may think.

 

It was only a small joke :) I did not think I could hold a 14 inch wheel! Hate to see that. I will dig a little on the forum :) Thank you!

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