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Gasmantle

A bit of thanks and a bit of encouragement for beginners.

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8 minutes ago, Gasmantle said:

Hi all,

Firstly I'd like to say thanks to the forum members who've been kind enough to answer a few beginner questions I posted here before buying my first ECU a few days ago.

I opted for a fairly basic (cheap) machine to test the water and see how I got well I coped and as a result bought a Inmotion V5F.

 I'm still very much a newbie rider but would like to say to others who are considering their first ECU, it really is something pretty much anyone can learn to ride, I'm in my 50's so I'm no youngster but can just about ride mine - so far it has 4 miles on the clock but I can now stay on it for perhaps 200 - 300 yds and hopefully I'll double that tomorrow :)

As for learning, I did the usual thing of holding onto a wall then trying to manage a few yards but soon realised the security of the wall was possibly slowing progress. In the end I went to the local park with a wide expanse of grass and decided to try to ride unaided, I fell a few times but on grass no harm was done and after about 15 mins I found I could just about ride a short distance.

The technique that has helped me is to start getting onboard holding something, then stand straight but take 10 secs to relax while focussing on a distant target once you are at ease lean forward and try to keep a reasonable speed (hence the grass), keep looking at the target and don't look down. After a few goes (falls) I found I can steer to some extent just by looking left or right.

Anyway like I say I'm no expert but think in a day or 2 I'll be able to ride properly so I'm hoping my newbie perspective may encourage others to have a go :)

Many thanks.

I'm happy and amazed, that you're doing so well regarding your learning curve!!!

It's obvious to me, some people are born with better balance skills,than the others (myself) :)

I've got the wheel for two months already, and it took me over a week to dare going out the house :)

And you can ride it for few hundreds of yards in very few days :)

Wow :)

I'm still crap riding it, still learning something and trying to improve my skills :)

You going to master it in no time :)

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2 minutes ago, PogArt Artur said:

I'm happy and amazed, that you're doing so well regarding your learning curve!!!

It's obvious to me, some people are born with better balance skills,than the others (myself) :)

I've got the wheel for two months already, and it took me over a week to dare going out the house :)

And you can ride it for few hundreds of yards in very few days :)

Wow :)

I'm still crap riding it, still learning something and trying to improve my skills :)

You going to master it in no time :)

Thanks Pog :)

I've found far and away the best advice is to get relaxed and composed while holding on to something, then just concentrate on something in the distance. It may not be a technique for everyone but I find looking to the distance aids balance. When looking down like I did at first I found my arms were waving everywhere to to stay on but looking ahead into the distance I can just about keep my arms still.

I struggle a bit getting onboard without holding on to something (I can do it sometimes) but with a bit of practice I'm hoping that will come soon 

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5 minutes ago, Gasmantle said:

Thanks Pog :)

I've found far and away the best advice is to get relaxed and composed while holding on to something, then just concentrate on something in the distance. It may not be a technique for everyone but I find looking to the distance aids balance. When looking down like I did at first I found my arms were waving everywhere to to stay on but looking ahead into the distance I can just about keep my arms still.

I struggle a bit getting onboard without holding on to something (I can do it sometimes) but with a bit of practice I'm hoping that will come soon 

It will come in its own time for sure!

Very soon!

I've learnt getting on the wheel over a week ago, maybe two weeks ago...

Since then I'm having difficulties :)

Yes I can do it, but it doesn't look good, lol :)

At one day I'm so so, the next day I'm struggling again, lol :)

And I can't look far away as you advice :)

I have to look down the feet :)

The pavement's surface is very uneven, plenty of cracks and gaps, holes...

If I don't look down, I'd fall for sure...

:)

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Hi Pog,

Thanks, you were one of the guys who offered advice when I first posted here before buying my first ECU so if I can return the favour then I pleased to do so.

I really do think it will help to look into the distance, I was getting nowhere fast looking down but the minute I looked to the distance it got easier. I use to do a lot of sea fishing from boats and was taught that to avoid sea sickness you need to look into the distant horizon.

People lose balance when the sensors in the inner ear tell the brain that the body is leaning while the eyes say something different. It's important that to keep balanced (or avoid sea sickness) that your inner ear and eyes send the same information to the brain. If you are looking down your inner ear may be sensing a lean but your eyes don't see it and the brain gets mixed messages that cause imbalance. Once you look to the distance if you are leaning the eyes and inner ear both send the same information to the brain so it is (relatively) easy to correct before you lose balance.

Honestly is does work - try it :)

 

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8 minutes ago, Gasmantle said:

Hi Pog,

Thanks, you were one of the guys who offered advice when I first posted here before buying my first ECU so if I can return the favour then I pleased to do so.

I really do think it will help to look into the distance, I was getting nowhere fast looking down but the minute I looked to the distance it got easier. I use to do a lot of sea fishing from boats and was taught that to avoid sea sickness you need to look into the distant horizon.

People lose balance when the sensors in the inner ear tell the brain that the body is leaning while the eyes say something different. It's important that to keep balanced (or avoid sea sickness) that your inner ear and eyes send the same information to the brain. If you are looking down your inner ear may be sensing a lean but your eyes don't see it and the brain gets mixed messages that cause imbalance. Once you look to the distance if you are leaning the eyes and inner ear both send the same information to the brain so it is (relatively) easy to correct before you lose balance.

Honestly is does work - try it :)

 

It's very kind of you, mentioning those warm words :)

Thank you for your keen advice my friend!

Unfortunately I can't follow what you say, if I do, I'll end up having face plant, lol :)

In my case,it would be too risky not checking up my feet frequently ...

So you do sea fishing!!!

That's even more amazing than EUC riding ! (joke - nothing else is better than EUC :) )

I just can imagine, there's so many of us, EUC riders.., how many different stories behind each of us!

Keep up good learning progress dear friend!

I'm pleased to follow your updates :)

 

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Well I think I've managed to ride on the level and be able to steer but going downhill is problematic and usually ends up in skin meets tarmac. 

Regarding apps, I have installed the Inmotion version that allows me to adjust settings for my wheel but I find the whole thing cluttered, is there another simpler app that just shows speed, distance covered etc without all the added extras of the Inmotion app?

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3 hours ago, Gasmantle said:

is there another simpler app that just shows speed, distance covered etc without all the added extras of the Inmotion app?

Your own brain can do that, without the added danger of a Bluetooth disconnection. It won't have that 1/10 of a mile accuracy, but then again you don't need to fiddle with your cell phone while riding these unstable devices. You can get away with that on a bicycle; the EUC is like triple the crash rate per mile over bicycles.

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14 minutes ago, LanghamP said:

 then again you don't need to fiddle with your cell phone while riding these unstable devices. You can get away with that on a bicycle; the EUC is like triple the crash rate per mile over bicycles.

There's no chance of me fiddling with a phone of anything else while on the move, I'm just about at the point where I can ride and keep my arms by my side. I still have a bit of a tendency to use my arms for turning.

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On 4/28/2019 at 9:56 PM, PogArt Artur said:

Thank you for your keen advice my friend!

Unfortunately I can't follow what you say, if I do, I'll end up having face plant, lol :)

 

As a non eucing eucer my it would perhaps make sense to do like @Gasmantle and head to a park. I'm not surprised you look down at your feet and feel nervous if do this over concrete!

I think grassland will, whilst bumpy and uneven in it's own way, will allow you some psychological confidence that you're not going get scraped to high heaven if you fall. I myself had planned to learn in the car park in my block but I think the open grass field sounds like a great approach. It reminds me of when I first learnt to snowboard - the blue runs even though easier than reds were harder for me because they were half the width of the red runs. The wider reds gave me time to mentally feel i had time to initate my turn and keep moving across the slope until i was ready to initiate the return turn.

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2 hours ago, rinzler said:

As a non eucing eucer my it would perhaps make sense to do like @Gasmantle and head to a park. I'm not surprised you look down at your feet and feel nervous if do this over concrete!

I think grassland will, whilst bumpy and uneven in it's own way, will allow you some psychological confidence that you're not going get scraped to high heaven if you fall. I myself had planned to learn in the car park in my block but I think the open grass field sounds like a great approach. It reminds me of when I first learnt to snowboard - the blue runs even though easier than reds were harder for me because they were half the width of the red runs. The wider reds gave me time to mentally feel i had time to initate my turn and keep moving across the slope until i was ready to initiate the return turn.

I am so sorry dear @rinzler , but your post is missing the point somehow...

I'm not sure how I made you think, I'm getting nervous..?

Why would I get nervous?

I am so sorry, but there's no nerves at all while I'm looking down at feet, but exited emotions, enjoyment !

I have to continuously checking down the bottom, because otherwise I couldn't avoid falling over the cracks or holes randomly placed over the pavements...

It's challenge rather, improving the riding skills, kind of off road experience instead of getting nervous my friend ? :)

Why would I get stressed.., if riding EUC is actually a joy itself :)

I'm sorry, but my written post is confused you, I think?

Thank you anyway for keen words and advices my friend :)

Best regards :)

 

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17 hours ago, Gasmantle said:

Well I think I've managed to ride on the level and be able to steer but going downhill is problematic and usually ends up in skin meets tarmac. 

Regarding apps, I have installed the Inmotion version that allows me to adjust settings for my wheel but I find the whole thing cluttered, is there another simpler app that just shows speed, distance covered etc without all the added extras of the Inmotion app?

https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.cooper.wheellog&hl=en

On 4/28/2019 at 9:31 PM, Gasmantle said:

I've found far and away the best advice is to get relaxed and composed while holding on to something, then just concentrate on something in the distance. It may not be a technique for everyone but I find looking to the distance aids balance. When looking down like I did at first I found my arms were waving everywhere to to stay on but looking ahead into the distance I can just about keep my arms still.

Agreed, looking ahead instead of down helps a lot.

On 4/28/2019 at 9:31 PM, Gasmantle said:

I struggle a bit getting onboard without holding on to something (I can do it sometimes) but with a bit of practice I'm hoping that will come soon 

Free mounting isn't that easy at all, so don't get frustrated if it takes a little more practice than you would have expected. It's definitely worth while to get fully at ease with being on and off with one foot and everything in between without holding on to something. I like the exercise to touch ground and put weight on one flat foot for a short time while riding slowly (requiring bent knees), but it may be still too early for this one.

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11 hours ago, PogArt Artur said:

I am so sorry dear @rinzler , but your post is missing the point somehow...

I'm not sure how I made you think, I'm getting nervous..?

Why would I get nervous?

I am so sorry, but there's no nerves at all while I'm looking down at feet, but exited emotions, enjoyment !

I have to continuously checking down the bottom, because otherwise I couldn't avoid falling over the cracks or holes randomly placed over the pavements...

It's challenge rather, improving the riding skills, kind of off road experience instead of getting nervous my friend ? :)

Why would I get stressed.., if riding EUC is actually a joy itself :)

I'm sorry, but my written post is confused you, I think?

Thank you anyway for keen words and advices my friend :)

Best regards :)

 

Sorry @PogArt Artur I think my words were wrong - I meant if there was a concern of the surface which would be making your mind distracted.

I think perhaps you are a much better euc rider then you describe! 

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5 hours ago, rinzler said:

Sorry @PogArt Artur I think my words were wrong - I meant if there was a concern of the surface which would be making your mind distracted.

I think perhaps you are a much better euc rider then you describe! 

Don't be sorry, it's happening when we're reading posts, as we get it as it is written, and our thoughts depends of the way we see the written story...

This is probably what was made you think, I might need keen advice to get better experience and improve the riding skills :)

And you did well, all you've advised is exactly correct, regarding getting better balance and stability while riding EUC :)

But it's all behind me already...

This is were my post was misunderstood I guess, as I were discussing the freely getting on the wheel with our friend @Gasmantle :)

I told him , that I've learnt getting on about a week ago, and I've still difficulties since then, and this is true :)

I'm getting on freely, but it's crap, lol :) , I'm every day commuting and working on that skill, to improve it every time and then :)

I'm struggling to place the second foot equally compared to the first one, usually the second foot I'm putting in a rush when getting on, so it's often a bit backward compared to the other, or a bit at front , lol ... 

It's very rare I manage to place the second foot just exact level on pedal, lol :)

Then @Gasmantle has replied with his keen suggestion, to don't look down the feet, but find some point to look at farther away, then it will help with balance and riding...

Our friend @Gasmantle is learning, he's doing very good, very quickly progressing, and all he advised was right, because looking down won't help at all when you learning to ride :)

So I replied that I have to look down the feet, because of all the cracked pavements surfaces, that I'm commuting on...

I simply can not risk to look at farther point, because I need to deal with all those holes and cracks placed randomly on pavements :)

There's no only surface defects, but all the rubbish left over too!

Empty bottles, fish&chips empty boxes left over, even milk containers, actually everything you can expect on the pavements...

This is why I have no choice but I need to look down the feet frequently :)

I'm guessing that you simply have confused my conversation with @Gasmantle, and you've tried to help me get relaxed by your keen advice :)

Thank you again for that @rinzler :)

I'm ok with my balance, riding, and such basic skills.

Commuting to work is challenging me every day, because of mentioned above defects on pavements, and rubbish leftover , that I need to look out for, to not fall over surface's holes or cracks, or avoid the food containers leftover by people ...

Best regards!

 

 

     

Edited by PogArt Artur

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I think getting onboard without holding onto anything is actually harder to learn than riding it. I'm setting aside a few hours to just practice getting on and off without going anywhere.

Edited by Gasmantle

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35 minutes ago, Gasmantle said:

I think getting onboard without holding onto anything is actually harder to learn than riding it. I'm setting aside a few hours to just practice getting on and off without going anywhere.

That's right my friend.

I bet some members achieved the pro skills of getting on the EUC with less efforts than I :)

As you know already, I'm commuting for over a week, daily, and every time I'm trying to improve not the riding, but as you've mentioned @Gasmantle the getting on :)

It's even more challenging while I'm next to queuing cars on street's traffic :)

I'm aware they're watching me, because it is so unique what we do, and being aware of their eyes on me, is making kind of pressure on me, lol, you know I mean @Gasmantle , not to fail to get on and set off nicely, lol !

hahahaaa :)

Just yesterday my manager has spot me, when I was leaving locker room after duty...

He had a surprised look at the wheel, and he started asking question what is that thing :)

Then he said, he has to see me riding that thing!

Together with us,few other bus drivers got out the building to see me setting off ... :)

Obviously the atmosphere was funny, everybody were joking, as between friends, it was about 7 of us outside, and they all were looking at me, how I do it, lol :)

It was even more funny, because my manager thought, that I will hold onto the trolley handle while riding it!?

He wasn't aware, that it's only to push the wheel, so he mistook it for kind of bicycle steering bar? Lol :)

So suddenly when I put the trolley handle immediately down and started setting off, he started advising - hold on it, hold on it! He gets scared I'm about to fall , lol :)

Then everybody had laughter, behind my back, as I were leaving away waving to those watchers , lol :)

Can you imagine all the stress on me, to get on nicely and go?

Lol :)

hahahaaa :)

Best regards my friend! 

Edited by PogArt Artur

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On 4/29/2019 at 2:03 AM, Gasmantle said:

Hi all,

Firstly I'd like to say thanks to the forum members who've been kind enough to answer a few beginner questions I posted here before buying my first ECU a few days ago.

I opted for a fairly basic (cheap) machine to test the water and see how well I coped and as a result bought a Inmotion V5F.

 I'm still very much a newbie rider but would like to say to others who are considering their first ECU, it really is something pretty much anyone can learn to ride, I'm in my 50's so I'm no youngster but can just about ride mine - so far it has 4 miles on the clock but I can now stay on it for perhaps 200 - 300 yds and hopefully I'll double that tomorrow :)

As for learning, I did the usual thing of holding onto a wall then trying to manage a few yards but soon realised the security of the wall was possibly slowing progress. In the end I went to the local park with a wide expanse of grass and decided to try to ride unaided, I fell a few times but on grass no harm was done and after about 15 mins I found I could just about ride a short distance.

The technique that has helped me is to start getting onboard holding something, then stand straight but take 10 secs to relax while focussing on a distant target once you are at ease lean forward and try to keep a reasonable speed (hence the grass), keep looking at the target and don't look down. After a few goes (falls) I found I can steer to some extent just by looking left or right.

Anyway like I say I'm no expert but think in a day or 2 I'll be able to ride properly so I'm hoping my newbie perspective may encourage others to have a go :)

Many thanks.

I had the exact same experience.  Almost a Zen thing, just imagine where you want the wheel to bring you, and let it take you there like a magic carpet.

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