Jump to content
Leyline

Newbie help please

Recommended Posts

I feel like the poles might throw your balance. I know if i started with poles, it would have messed with me a bit. Plus, once you can roll, a lot of your struggles are going to come from left and right over compensation. You'll have to learn about this without anything on either side of you to get in the way.

The cool thing about this is that, even today going out there, I've learned more and its led to an even more comfortable ride. And i ride at least 9km/day. (Id ride more, but thats the size of my cityyyyyyy :( )

  • Like 1
  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I injured my knee a few years ago, and I cannot run. When I was asking about how athletic you need to be to learn euc everyone said you just need to be able to stand.  It looks so easy on video, but I have found it is very dangerous that I cannot run, and also that my wheel bites my leg bone VERY hard on mounts, so even 10-15 mins with sticks might mean I get to ride straight well, and then learn to turn.  Yes skills I need to know but I am having to take this really slow and really gentle, or I have to give it up. So I’ll take learning one thing at a time.  I am also doing a lot of core strength and squats to try to gain strength to do this safely.  

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
20 minutes ago, Leyline said:

I injured my knee a few years ago, and I cannot run.

Sorry, but you should have said that from the start  :)

I would then recommend the @novazeus method.  Riding between two hand rails. Now I understand your insistence on using the poles!

His method is much safer for you. ;) 

You would have to make a few searches under his avatar.

BTW, I hope he is OK.

Edited by pico
corr

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@Leyline, I don't think there is anything wrong with trying to use walking sticks, it's worth a try. Maybe don't attach them to your hands before you have some experience with it and be prepared that they can be damaged from getting in contact with the wheel. The "just to be able to stand" is slightly exaggerated, because in the end your knees are your suspension and bending the knees is your safety leverage to keep the wheel under the body. Similar as with skiing, just stand on them limits the way of how you could use them. Nevertheless, IIRC some people have reported that they can use the EUC even though they have difficulties to walk.

  • Upvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Most likely the poles will just distract you (as would be anything else held in your hand), but there's no harm in trying.

  • Upvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
54 minutes ago, Rik said:

when I came to a stop my right foot pointed backwards ..

I assume you were never double jointed up until then.  Ouch!  Still, you're doing better than Michael Shoemacher (SP?) Sonny Bono, and Michael Kennedy.

Edited by Smoother
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was just thinking about it, and if it would be helpful.  I've been skiing before, a lot of people use poles, I just wondered if it could be a new way to "do the learning"...
I don't have any sticks yet, but of course I would not tie them to my hands, and I would kinda just use them like ski poles, let them hang back. Obviously not in a tucked position though LOL.

I've been working on really keeping upright posture, and relaxing, I can bend my knees, I can do a dozen squats, I can jump slightly, I just can run, more than a few steps and I probably look like an ostrich if I tried.

I have mounted the wheel with no assist a few times, it's just a horrid pain on my shin bone, which I figure if I pick this up, I would get better at / quicker at the jump on.  I also figure I would just always wear a right side shin guard if it continued to bother me much...

I am really good near the parking poles, I might be leaning too much to reach them / depending on them...

I am did manage to free ride like 30m across an open space, from a wall to another wall a few times, maybe I will try the soccer field thing, I didn't want to learn on the grass in case bums / softness made it harder, but I've seen some videos of people learning in a day after just 2-3 hours at a field.

Thanks for chatting with me guys!

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 hours ago, Leyline said:

I injured my knee a few years ago, and I cannot run.

If you cannot run, then ever time you come off, higher than walking speed, is going to be a problem.  You can insist that you will always pay attention and will never be forced to come off, but eventually something will catch you out and you will need to run a few steps, or face plant.  Will your general health be able to handle that?

 

41 minutes ago, Leyline said:

it's just a horrid pain on my shin bone

Without video it's hard to diagnose this.  I think we are all surprised how much pressure is applied to our shins, when we are learning.  Experimenting to find a better technique is probably the key.  If you mount with your right leg first, then you should seriously lean the wheel over towards your left leg before you raise your left leg off the ground.  Here's why; you need to visualize your weight acting straight down, in a line, through your right foot.  Now visualize leaning the wheel over so that imaginary line passes through the tyre where it contacts the ground.  Obviously, this requires the wheel to be leaned over quite a bit to the left.In, or near, this state, there is no pressure on your right shin.  But don't worry, you won't be riding like this.  As you raise your left leg off the ground (and by default, place all your weight on the right pedal), the right pedal will start to drop at the same time your left foot is rising to meet the pedal.  Pressure on your right shin will rise as the wheel starts to lean against it, but before the pressure reaches a painful level, your left foot will be on the pedal and the distribution of weight will be shared; taking the pressure off your right shin.  You can do this while stationary (using a launch assist device, like a lamp post) and when you are more skilled it is the beginning of one foot launches.

Good luck

PS forget the ski poles. They are not going to help you learn, and could cause you to crash in unexpected ways, damaging your bad knee.

 

Edited by Smoother
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I thought I posted a pic of how the corner is, but my legs are long so the top edge of the pad on the ninebot e+ contacts my leg right on the bone below where my calf muscle starts.  Imgur won’t log in atm, I’ll check later  

I intend to get better / quicker at mounting so like you said there is  it sustained pressure and that should help. 

Just while learning with frequent dismount  remounts and slow mounting ability, after 8-9 mounts I can’t take it anymore.  

I have been improving my core with planks and pushups, also doing squats sets of 10 two or more times a day. I know what you mean about not being able to run off increasing faceplants, then again any slip over 10-12mph probably means trip/face plant if you aren’t ready, since it’s only a ninebot e and I am 6’4 240lbs, that’s gonna be near my top end, I’ll eithter be able to take a few hops or I’m gonna eat it anyway     Gonna keep the gear on  

I also intend to keep it low and slow for a while  

I think my lcl is acting up, so in a few weeks of rest and pt I will start working on being able to run again, especially as I continue loose weight and rebuild my core strength  

I had cancer and gained weight while I was weak and fatigued, I’ve lost 30lbs, and intend to loose another 20-25 while increasing my fitness. so yes I hope to be able to jog or run again and conquering the euc is my treat for doing so  

 

 

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

https://imgur.com/2b01yX1

Here is the image... I got on the chromebook and got imgur to log in, this is not me, my leg is even a bit longer, but here is where the ninebot presses my bone raw...

I've got soccer shinguards now, so worst case I will just keep them on under the socks/pants..

I've also worked on the tip/step on, but I'm still awkward at it.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, Leyline said:

https://imgur.com/2b01yX1

Here is the image... I got on the chromebook and got imgur to log in, this is not me, my leg is even a bit longer, but here is where the ninebot presses my bone raw...

I've got soccer shinguards now, so worst case I will just keep them on under the socks/pants..

I've also worked on the tip/step on, but I'm still awkward at it.

youll get used to it and wont even notice it at all.. everyone thinks this in the beginning.. now all of the wheels i ride are super confortable could ride all day

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
27 minutes ago, Leyline said:

but my legs are long so the top edge of the pad on the ninebot e+ contacts my leg right on the bone below where my calf muscle starts.

Everybody gets that regardless of their leg length.  Improving your technique is what reduces the pressure, not pads or shorter legs, or, or, or. Do I wish wheels had softer pads? yes, we all do, but they are not, so we have to adapt and endure.  People who ride on one leg feel these hard pads too, but they adapt their foot position and leg angle, and technique, to minimize it. (That's another lesson) The shin guards will help, but they are a mask, literally and may actually hinder your learning.  Yes keep getting the weight down, that's not the strongest wheel for a guy your current size.

You don't have to be quick at mounting.  With a good technique, it's entirely possible to start on one leg and wheel off for yards before placing the other foot gently on the pedal, or not at all.  No need to rush the other foot up there. If an experienced rider has to rush the second foot up, they haven't quite nailed the procedure. But that is a somewhat advanced technique, so not your concern right now either; more of a target to aim for, knowing that it's possible. 

I'm not sure What procedure you are following in your training, but if you are practicing mounting before riding, I would suggest you reverse that.  The further you can ride without coming off, the less mounting you have to do, and the less shin pain you have to endure. Once you can ride at will, not only will the mental pressure to mount be reduced, but your skill at controlling the wheel, before during and after the mount will have increased exponentially, taking further pressure off you. And if your shin complains, you can stop practicing mounting for a while, and just go ride for a few miles.

Good luck.:)

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, Smoother said:

Everybody gets that regardless of their leg length.  Improving your technique is what reduces the pressure, not pads or shorter legs, or, or, or. Do I wish wheels had softer pads? yes, we all do, but they are not, so we have to adapt and endure.  People who ride on one leg feel these hard pads too, but they adapt their foot position and leg angle, and technique, to minimize it. (That's another lesson) The shin guards will help, but they are a mask, literally and may actually hinder your learning.  Yes keep getting the weight down, that's not the strongest wheel for a guy your current size.

You don't have to be quick at mounting.  With a good technique, it's entirely possible to start on one leg and wheel off for yards before placing the other foot gently on the pedal, or not at all.  No need to rush the other foot up there. If an experienced rider has to rush the second foot up, they haven't quite nailed the procedure. But that is a somewhat advanced technique, so not your concern right now either; more of a target to aim for, knowing that it's possible. 

I'm not sure What procedure you are following in your training, but if you are practicing mounting before riding, I would suggest you reverse that.  The further you can ride without coming off, the less mounting you have to do, and the less shin pain you have to endure. Once you can ride at will, not only will the mental pressure to mount be reduced, but your skill at controlling the wheel, before during and after the mount will have increased exponentially, taking further pressure off you. And if your shin complains, you can stop practicing mounting for a while, and just go ride for a few miles.

Good luck.:)

i know im probably an outlier but i actually prefer hard pads.. the harder the better, i dont like a cushion, i like something my leg can easily slide back and forth on but is just barely enough of a buffer between the hard corners of the plastic and my leg.. love the ninebot pads and love the kingsong 16 pads.. absolutely hate the acm and similar pads.. v5f is too soft but is ok because the wheel is ridiculously skinny and my leg only grazes them on the sharpest of turns.. you wanna feel pain try the airwheel x8 lmao

Edited by Rywokast

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The shin pain from mounting is an issue for me too on most wheels, especially the low height ones that all mine have been: Lhotz, 16S, MSX. I do have to pad the shin contact point for this exact issue. My condition surely makes it worse, as my soft tissue is not as bouncy as it should, so I have less internal padding.

I can run only for a few steps. For the 15000+km I’ve ridden, I’ve crashed only twice after the learning period, and running wouldn’t have saved me on either of them.

I can’t say it would be the same for you though, every crash is different. But for me all of it is still easily worth even the increased risks. We just have to ride extra mindfully, and well padded up of course.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@mrelwood Thanks, glad to hear all of the stuff bouncing around in my head isn't just nonsense, and that being able to run track would never hurt, but isn't required.

Gonna be safe, and keep working to regain a much higher fitness level.

@Smoother I was trying to do the "skateboard" thing, where you just keep stepping on and floating on one foot, but after that first night, I could not touch my shin to anything for 12+ days, I decided to go with the mount assist, and trying to ride further like you said, going to go back and work on mounting after I have riding and turning down.

Got some of these poles at a parking place that are about mid chest height, so I've been using these...

image.png.4a5e5918559f74dc98d9865502af1ad0.png

of course I would live a park with a long fence or railing, but I'm working with what's around.

 

Thanks again guys, I would feel so alone and have completely abandoned this without you.

  • Like 2
  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×