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Leyline

Newbie help please

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I've been reading LOTS and watching every video I can, so please excuse that I could not find a good answer to this....

Wheel: ninebot one e+
I am having some trouble, I think I set my speed to 4kph or 6kph, is this too low, ie: I will just wobble and wobble because I can't get a decent speed to balance well?
While learning, should I limit the speed, and what speed should I limit it to? 
Does the speed limit just beep, or does it actually tilt the wheel back to slow you?
(I think I feel it not letting me get up to speed and causes me to not get a good forward glide going, is it real or just my imagination?)

While I am already here... The softness setting; does this mean how aggressive it is at accelerating / decelerating, or how quickly it reacts to weight shifting?
What would you guys recommend for learning, and as a tall old guy, I really need it to be easy/safe rather than performance.

Thanks tons in advance, you guys are pretty great.

 

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I set my Inmotion V8 to 10kph max and it felt correct for me. I'm going to change it to 12kph next time. I'm not interested in going fast at the moment. I'm working on balance and turning at slow speeds.

6kph is too slow for sure. I think you would be happier at 10kph.

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1 hour ago, Leyline said:

I've been reading LOTS and watching every video I can, so please excuse that I could not find a good answer to this....

Wheel: ninebot one e+
I am having some trouble, I think I set my speed to 4kph or 6kph, is this too low, ie: I will just wobble and wobble because I can't get a decent speed to balance well?
While learning, should I limit the speed, and what speed should I limit it to? 
Does the speed limit just beep, or does it actually tilt the wheel back to slow you?
(I think I feel it not letting me get up to speed and causes me to not get a good forward glide going, is it real or just my imagination?)

While I am already here... The softness setting; does this mean how aggressive it is at accelerating / decelerating, or how quickly it reacts to weight shifting?
What would you guys recommend for learning, and as a tall old guy, I really need it to be easy/safe rather than performance.

Thanks tons in advance, you guys are pretty great.

 

I'm afraid I will be going through the same troubles very soon  :)

I am not going to set any speed limits atm.

All I know is that the wheel will tilt you back if you try to exceed the speed limit, I can easily imagine, that if your speed limit is set too low, and you're struggling to keep your positiin well, then you might easily unconsciously exceed your setting limit, what may ending up with tilting you back by the wheel in prevention of exceeding the setting?

I'm only guessing  ;)

I'm not going to set any limitations regarding the speed.

While learning, I may have speed up quicker to catch my balance, then slow down suddenly, just to work out my balance skills...

I think setting the speed limit too low might not help at all?

SOFTNESS ;

I bet I saw a tutorial, where somebody has mention that setting and tested...

If I'm correct, the 0 is to hold the wheel horizontally leveled, so no much of your body inclining is involved, but your feet move rather to drive the wheel...

The increasing of that setting to 5 for example, will cause the wheel to be more "flexible" and then your body will have more freedom to incline forward or recline, kind of balancing on the rope alike...?

This is what I think as a fresh newbie ;) regarding your doubts ;)

I hope some more experienced members will answer it properly  ;)

 

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I hope this may help in the beginning.

The Ninebot One is a rather "soft" wheel.

I would use the hardest mode which is 0.  

I would recommend for training to put the speed limit as high as is permitted. (It depends if your wheel was previously used beyond the speed locked mileage)

You don't want to be incommoded by a tilt back for the moment. You may want to learn the feel after and play with it.

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Oh, well. Once on the wheel try lo look straight ahead after you have positioned your feet.

Wheels for beginners have a tendency to go where you are looking at.

This is because your head will follow and then your shoulder.

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9 minutes ago, Smoother said:

It's really not necessary to set a speed limit.  Hitting a tilt back as a beginner is sure to throw you off, because your body/brain hasn't memorized riding an EUC, and pedals that tilt all by themselves is the last thing you want.  All you need to know about top speed, is that you need to be able to ride at a consistent speed and brake at will.  If you cannot control the speed of the wheel (regardless of how long you can ride before falling off) then you need to work on the position of your feet, and practice going back and forth a few feet (while leaning against something) to program the acts of acceleration, and braking.  

EDIT @PogArt Artur s post is quite accurate and well thought out.  I'm out of ups right now so don't read anything negative into the lack of them right now.

Thank you for positive comment...

I went through many of video reviews to learn as much as possible what is riding the EUC alike. I think it's awesome device, very universal, but it does need to be understood well to master it,and then have a joy of riding it...

Best regards.

 

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2 minutes ago, pico said:

Oh, well. Once on the wheel try lo look straight ahead after you have positioned your feet.

Wheels for beginners have a tendency to go where you are looking at.

This is because your head will follow and then your shoulder.

This is principal for riding the motorcycle as well  ;)

"Watch the bend you want to turn, not down your front wheel"

Watching at short range (down your feet) won't be good idea ;)

Very wise advice pico  ;)

 

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47 minutes ago, pico said:

Oh, well. Once on the wheel try lo look straight ahead after you have positioned your feet.

Wheels for beginners have a tendency to go where you are looking at.

This is because your head will follow and then your shoulder.

+1 on that.  When I was learning, I could ride miles at a time, but if I looked at something, I turned to wards it. In hindsight, I should have used this phenomenon to help me steer towards something I actually want to steer towards.

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I can't add too much as Im a nub too, but from my struggles, I learned that its just like the others said. Don't lower your top speed. You wont be going that fast anyways as you're learning your balance, and from someone whos wheel had calibration problems, let me tell you right now, the pain of trying to ride a wheel that tilts up when you're moving is like throwing a wrench in the spokes of your bike while trying to practice downhill. Place your max speed back up. You wont be hitting it anytime soon. Focus more on learning to balance, ride a little, turn. Stopping and maintaining a decent speed. I learned inside for a chunk of my practice, so I had to learn to ride slowly. My max speed was still 20km/h, but i was riding around at like 7 or 8. For the speed you have set, you could probably hit it on a push off and then it would tilt you back immediately, essentially destroying your balance and confidence in the wheel. So yeah, take off the limiter. As much as it SEEMS its a safety, riding these things is less like pulling a lever and being at max, and more like the accelerator on a car, iin which YOU control the speed.  

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@PogArt Artur’s answer is dead on correct and well written. Only one thing to add:

Learning to ride takes time. Hours and hours on end. If you get frustrated, take a break and try again, or continue tomorrow. And then day after that, etc. The reward will be there eventually!

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2 hours ago, mrelwood said:

@PogArt Artur’s answer is dead on correct and well written. Only one thing to add:

Learning to ride takes time. Hours and hours on end. If you get frustrated, take a break and try again, or continue tomorrow. And then day after that, etc. The reward will be there eventually!

Cheers...

Lol, seems I have managed to learn some theory ...

Before me the practice riding test hahahaaa ;)

Today is the day the E+ will come  ;)

I wish myself GOOD LUCK hahahaaa  ;)

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Posted (edited)
On 3/13/2019 at 7:26 AM, PogArt Artur said:

Cheers...

Lol, seems I have managed to learn some theory ...

Before me the practice riding test hahahaaa ;)

Today is the day the E+ will come  ;)

I wish myself GOOD LUCK hahahaaa  ;)

It's a pity you're not closer, I'd pop over and assist.  They say assisted learning is a lot faster than by yourself (as I did it)

Check your tire pressure.  Out of the box it can be way too low.  Don't pump it up to maximum, as that is like riding on a knife edge and learning takes heaps longer (ask me how I know)

What is the right pressure?  Hard to say.  Try this: standing on the wheel, stationary (hold on to a wall or something) bounce up and down a bit.  You should be somewhere between a rock hard tire and one that just feels too squishy.  You won't know which pressure is exactly right for you because it will all feel so new.  Just avoid the extremes,  later on, when you can ride, you can tailor the pressure to your liking.

Check the battery too, don't start riding if the level is under 50%, I don't think the E+ battery is that big so 50% of small is dangerous, unless one knows what he is doing, which you don't. yet.

Wear your protection.  Beginners fall at any speed including zero, and they fall in weird ways (again, ask me how I know).  Wear tall boots or protect your ankles/shins in some way.  Beginners always seem to get bitten in the ankles/shins by the pedals when they come off (me too). Rarely happens once you have learned.

Practice in a wide open space, where your run away wheel (it happens) can't damage anything or hurt someone.  Try and stay away from spectators.  If someone starts to spectate, sit down and take a break untll they get bored and feck off.  you don't need the pressure of spectators.

Pick out a few choice launch assist devices; lamp posts, walls, tall trash bins, anything that can assist you getting on with both feet.  Don't try one foot launches yet.  Get some riding under your belt first, then learn that.  It's too exhausting and frustrating the other way around because even if you succeed in a one foot launch, you're immediately off again because you haven't learned to ride yet.

Try to ride between your launch assist devices, because when you come off, the walk to the closest one will be less.  Walking a short wheel repeatedly with no or a low handle is a back breaker.  Thank God someone incorporated trolley handles.

Good luck. Keep us posted (not of the face plant thread hopefully)

 

 

Edited by Smoother
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2 hours ago, Smoother said:

It's a pity you're not closer, I'd pop over and assist.  They say assisted learning is a lot faster than by yourself (as I did it)

Check your tire pressure.  Out of the box it can be way too low.  Don't pump it up to maximum, as that is like riding on a knife edge and learning takes heaps longer (ask me how I know)

What is the right pressure?  Hard to say.  Try this: standing on the wheel, stationary (hold a wall of something) bounce up and down a bit.  You should be somewhere between a rock hard tire and one that just feels too squishy.  You won't know which pressure is exactly right for you because it will all feel so new.  Just avoid the extremes,  later on, when you can ride, you can tailor the pressure to your liking.

Check the battery too, don't start riding if the level is under 50%, I don't think the E+ battery is that big so 50% of small is dangerous, unless one knows what he is doing, which you don't. yet.

Wear your protection.  Beginners fall at any speed including zero, and they fall in weird ways (again, ask me how I know).  Wear tall boots or protect your ankles/shins in some way.  Beginners always seem to get bitten in the ankles/shins by the pedals when they come off (me too). Rarely happens once you have learned.

Practice in a wide open space, where your run away wheel (it happens) can't damage anything or hurt someone.  Try and stay away from spectators.  If someone starts to spectate, sit down and take a break untll they get bored and feck off.  you don't need the pressure of spectators.

Pick out a few choice launch assist devices; lamp posts, walls, tall trash bins, anything that can assist you getting on with both feet.  Don't try one foot launches yet.  Get some riding under your belt first, then learn that.  It's too exhausting and frustrating the other way around because even if you succeed in a one foot launch, you're immediately off again because you haven't learned to ride yet.

Try to ride between your launch assist devices, because when you come off, the walk to the closest one will be less.  Walking a short wheel repeatedly with no or a low handle is a back breaker.  Thank God someone incorporated trolley handles.

Good luck. Keep us posted (not of the face plant thread hopefully)

 

 

Cheers !!!

Yeah it's shame we living far away...

I will keep posting the progress (if any) hahaaaa ;)

Hopefully in good condition  ;)

Ian told me he already inflated the tyre for me and has charged the battery too, to easy my first go, but I will follow your kind advices at the beginning for sure, because they're great.

Thank you!

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Thanks everyone.  My wheel was well used so the max is unlocked.  Should I really remove my limit, or was there a good default 12, or 20kph I should set?

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54 minutes ago, Leyline said:

Thanks everyone.  My wheel was well used so the max is unlocked.  Should I really remove my limit, or was there a good default 12, or 20kph I should set?

My ks-16s was locked to 20kmph. That was perfect for me. 

I dropped it down to 12 to feel the tilt back. And after getting spooked a few times, i put it back up to 20 and continued practicing. I didnt even get close to that 20 mark for many many km of riding. I was busy trying not to die, and doing circles in a school ground. After you get more comfortable, you can start moving a bit faster. But you wont need to worry about your top speed for a while until you can actually ride comfortably AT that speed. Or if you set it lower to practice feeling the tiltback. 

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@PogArt Artur 

Did your e+ arrive? How are you doing on it?
I would say, remember to take breaks, really, keep it small.
I tried to do over an hour practice, and while I was really in to it, I really got tired and paid for it in when I tripped.
I had to take 5-7 days off.  I've only gotten to practice a few times now because of that recovery period.
Now I am sticking with 15-20 minutes and even if I want to do more, to rest, and give my muscles time to and adapt to the new training.
I feel like I jump back on next time more confident, and ready, before I felt like I was just trying to catch back up.

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9 minutes ago, Leyline said:

@PogArt Artur 

Did your e+ arrive? How are you doing on it?
I would say, remember to take breaks, really, keep it small.
I tried to do over an hour practice, and while I was really in to it, I really got tired and paid for it in when I tripped.
I had to take 5-7 days off.  I've only gotten to practice a few times now because of that recovery period.
Now I am sticking with 15-20 minutes and even if I want to do more, to rest, and give my muscles time to and adapt to the new training.
I feel like I jump back on next time more confident, and ready, before I felt like I was just trying to catch back up.

Thank you for asking ;)

You've probably missed my other topic, where I did share the great news about receiving the E+ ;)

It's been delivered two days ago Wednesday ;)

I'm working every day, not having much time to focus on the learning, but it might be a good thing?

Not having much time is making me to jump on the wheel for short times only...

5 or 10 min max...

There and back on the kitchen floor ...

Trying to get used to the feeling of being on the wheel  ;)

The weather is unpleasant at the moment, strong windy weather and the rain...

So instead of going out, I'm forced to stay home...

As soon as the weather improves, I will try my first steps outdoors ;)

I have an idea to go out with my skiing poles in hands!

I saw a video, where an elderly person rides the wheel with great support of the poles!

That might be good idea, to have some supporting "tools" in hands in case of losing the balance..?

I'm willing to try it on my own ;)

I hope you are doing better and better!

We will keep in touch ;)

Thank you.

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Posted (edited)
8 minutes ago, PogArt Artur said:

 

I have an idea to go out with my skiing poles in hands!

 

Not necessarily a good idea. You may hurt yourself with the poles. You NEED those arms for balance at this stage...Just imagine you are on a tightrope.

What worked for me is spacing garbage bins every 5 feet(lean on them when in distress), and gradually spacing them. 

Edited by pico
corr
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4 minutes ago, pico said:

Not necessarily a good idea. You may hurt yourself with the poles. You NEED those arms for balance at this stage...Just imagine you are on a tightrope.

As a newbie I don't know what it's like pico ;)

It might be wrong experience as you warning ...

Just don't know...

They have helped me in past learning skirollers...

Thanks to having poles in hands I did avoid many falls while losing the balance left or right.

It was great to support the falling movement with the pole, and keep the balance rather than falling...

It might be wrong when riding EUC, but I wish I could at least check it out on my own, if you know I mean?

I will share my experience once I try it...

Thank you for the comment pico  ;)

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Do so by, by all means. I did too. The GF wanted to humble me and showed me a picture of me trying it. ;)

We have to bring ourselves back when we were one year old learning to walk.

Always AIM for a nearby Object. The Brain does the rest. This is in our genes. Our first step is usually to our parent arms or to a nearby table. And our HEAD is UP.

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17 minutes ago, pico said:

Do so by, by all means. I did too. The GF wanted to humble me and showed me a picture of me trying it. ;)

We have to bring ourselves back when we were one year old learning to walk.

Always AIM for a nearby Object. The Brain does the rest. This is in our genes. Our first step is usually to our parent arms or to a nearby table. And our HEAD is UP.

Good point !

Thank you  ;)

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