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egress123

fireproof EUC charging station

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Hi there.

As the battery of EUC becomes bigger, the risk of having bigger fire related to battery is increasing.  

I'm trying to find a way to fireproof my charging station.

I was thinking about getting a metal cabinet, store and charge my EUC in it, and have a fire extinguisher that is activated by fire (similar to the one in the link) inside the cabinet in case it catches fire.

https://www.amazon.com/Extinguisher-Suppression-Device-Safety-Product/dp/B01JVXFQ6E/ref=sr_1_5?keywords=fire+extinguisher+ball&qid=1552319740&s=gateway&sr=8-5

 

what do you guys think?  have you done any work to fireproof your charging station?  if so, do you have any recommendations on how it should be setup?  

 

thanks guys.

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You can't extinguish a LiPo fire. You can only extinguish what burns around it. Don't make a completely closed cabinet. You'll make a bomb.

What you would require is the equivalent of a BattSafe (XL) box that hobbyists use to store their small LiPos. That contains the fire and has filters for the fumes, while not being airtight as to not create a bomb.

The safest however is simply charging outside on or in a non-flammable surface (e.g. bricks).

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2 minutes ago, ir_fuel said:

You can't extinguish a LiPo fire. You can only extinguish what burns around it. Don't make a completely closed cabinet. You'll make a bomb.

What you would require is the equivalent of a BattSafe (XL) box that hobbyists use to store their small LiPos. That contains the fire and has filters for the fumes, while not being airtight as to not create a bomb.

The safest however is simply charging outside on or in a non-flammable surface (e.g. bricks).

Thanks for the comment.  I have no other place to charge.  I can only charge in my garage....

 

hmm.  this is going to be a problem... :(

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1 minute ago, egress123 said:

hmm.  this is going to be a problem... :(

Only if you make it one :D

Don't forget we are dealing with batteries encased in round cells, not your average quadcopter pouch LiPos. I'm in the "fpv" community, and the euc community, and LiPo fires are in both communities extremely rare, and in the case of the FPV one usually related to either crashing battery packs (hard) in the ground, or undervoltage + trying to recharge them anyway.

Pouch LiPos are a lot more sensitive than the ones in the round cells. Also check the amount of wheels on this forum, the amount of miles ridden, the amount of charge cycles cumulated by all members. Set this next to the number of fires everyone has had here and you'll know how big the chances of this happening are.

  • Upvote 2

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I thought about the same and decided it wasn't worth the investment given the low risk. I do however charge my wheels in the garage with the chargers on the cement floor.  Figure if a fire breaks out then I'll have some warning given my garage is detached. 

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25 minutes ago, Dzlchef said:

I thought about the same and decided it wasn't worth the investment given the low risk. I do however charge my wheels in the garage with the chargers on the cement floor.  Figure if a fire breaks out then I'll have some warning given my garage is detached. 

My garage is attached..  and I see those video clips of InMotion V10f on fire, I get quite nervous having my EUC charged overnight in my garage.

maybe a smoke alarm might be good enough for now.

 

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For safety and awareness: You can absolutely extinguish lithium battery fires!!  

The battery usually contains such small amounts of lithium metal, during the failure that cause fire, the lithium has already burned out and added water does not have lithium metal to react with.

Myth-busted: You do not "need" a class D copper extinguisher, since the battery usually burns out the lithium quickly, what is left is plastic and other things that have caught fire, and water is excellent at cooling and dousing the flames.

Quote

 

A small Li-ion fire can be handled like any other combustible fire. For best result use a foam extinguisher, CO2, ABC dry chemical, powdered graphite, copper powder or soda (sodium carbonate). 
FAA instructs flight attendants to use water or soda pop. Water-based products are most readily available and are appropriate since Li-ion contains very little lithium metal that reacts with water. Water also cools the adjacent area and prevents the fire from spreading. Research laboratories and factories also use water to extinguish Li-ion battery fires.

 

I have seen the FAA test videos: You will notice simple water is used with high effect.  Link below, also other lipo fires in charging containers.

 

 

 

 

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Posted (edited)

I just have a smoke alarm and never leave batteries charging while I'm away/sleeping. From what I know, water can be used to extinguish the battery fire, but it doesn't work by depriving the fire of oxygen, but by cooling the cells under the critical temperature (something like 125-150 Celsius?) so that the "thermal runaway" -chain reaction stops. So anything like fire blankets or even a fire extinguisher might be useless, as they work by "suffocating" the fire. I guess I'd either dump it somewhere where it can safely burn out (outside, because of the toxic fumes and on a non-flammable surface) if possible, submerge it or just pour water on it until it hopefully stops re-igniting. Of course if it would start to look like the fire can't be controlled, it'd be time to evacuate everyone else and my own ass outside  ;) 

I witnessed the house opposite to ours burn down two years ago, it was about 10 minutes from the first flickers I saw to over 1-meter flames coming out under the roof and windows blowing out. Electrical fire from the mains cabinet.

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Edited by esaj

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22 hours ago, Leyline said:

For safety and awareness: You can absolutely extinguish lithium battery fires!!  

The battery usually contains such small amounts of lithium metal, during the failure that cause fire, the lithium has already burned out and added water does not have lithium metal to react with.

Myth-busted: You do not "need" a class D copper extinguisher, since the battery usually burns out the lithium quickly, what is left is plastic and other things that have caught fire, and water is excellent at cooling and dousing the flames.

I have seen the FAA test videos: You will notice simple water is used with high effect.  Link below, also other lipo fires in charging containers.

 

 

 

so... are you saying my proposed plan at the top of this thread is still doable??

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