Jump to content
seage

So my Brother Learned to Ride in 15 minutes

Recommended Posts

@seage
malheureusement (sadly) I have no Utube channel. Ironically ive had an honorable mention for my "dancing" last summer (but that's another story ). I'm not the only person with my type skillsets on this forum, if I recall reading correctly in the past.

Yes, it was the Inmotion V3S two-wheeled euc when it was new. It's actually great for smooth surfaces, and beginners. After a year, you get hungry for something more versatile. (Honorable mention to: @Scatcat

In any case, welcome to another level of ton bon vie ! (Your good life)

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
5 hours ago, Yunicyle said:

Just today, I taught my 13 year old daughter and 2 of her friends how to ride on a ninebot one E (beater wheel).  Her athletic friend picked it up in about 20 mins and was riding by herself.  My daughter and the other girl took a little longer, maybe about 40 mins.  All three girls learned and got the "click" and was riding by themselves amazingly in one learning session.  These kids picked this up so fast it is really unbelievable.  It took me 3 days to learn to ride and it was exhausting for me, sore feet and shin, sweating like a dog as I was exerting too much energy and effort.  These girls were laughing and giggling the whole time while learning and they seemed so relaxed as opposed to when I was learning, I think that made a big difference as well.

 

 

 

Lack of fear is what I think it is.  They don’t necessarily learn faster.  It is they they overcome of have no fear, haven’t learned fear yet.  We have to overcome fear to Lear.  Fear of faking, fear of failure, fear of never learning it.  

It is interesting how the mind works and how much it lies to us. 

@seage learn to recognize the fear and when your mind is lying to you. When you can observe it and be aware of it, you are one step closer being free. Sounds like crazy stuff but most people go through life with zero awareness, a prison in their own mind.  

At least you are atarting to recognize the pattern of the voice in your head. 

By the way, gear up.  That should take the fear of falling out. 

Mad for the sweating, my theory is that we are using all sorts of muscles to compensate.  Once your brain figures it out, you will stop sweating.  I had the same thing when I was learning. 

Not to discourage you, but on EUC everything needs to be learned.  Going forward is just the first step. After you are able to go straight, you need to learn turning, turning left is different than turning right.  Turning at high speed is different than turning at low speed.  Mounting without holding a wall, going slow, one legged riding, going backwards, seated riding, jumping, etc.  but all fun after you get the going forward.  

Edited by eddiemoy
  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, LanghamP said:

People who already know how to ride a bike can ride an EUC (albeit badly), they just haven't accepted it yet.

That manifests by the new rider staying below the stall speed of a gyroscopically balanced vehicle. Get the rider above that speed and most difficulties resolve themselves.

That really is true. People ride below walking speed, barely inching forward, and on uneven terrain (that damn grass everyone uses), and then wonder why learning EUCs is so hard.

Nobody would try to learn to ride a bike by going as slowly as possible on grass.

From easy to hard, the order to learn:

  • Going straight and "fast", like running speed + (easy)
  • Doing curves on pavement, or going slower (a bit harder)
  • Mounting, or going really slow (much harder)
  • Upvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, Coffee guy said:

malheureusement (sadly) I have no Utube channel. Ironically ive had an honorable mention for my "dancing" last summer (but that's another story ). I'm not the only person with my type skillsets on this forum, if I recall reading correctly in the past.

Haha, now im curious about the dancing! And thats even more incredible to me.But i guess if you said they share similarities in balance, it begins to make more sense!

9 hours ago, Coffee guy said:

Yes, it was the Inmotion V3S two-wheeled euc when it was new. It's actually great for smooth surfaces, and beginners. After a year, you get hungry for something more versatile. (Honorable mention to: @Scatcat

In any case, welcome to another level of ton bon vie ! (Your good life)

Ahh! I looked it up. That thing looks really cool! But i dont know why it makes me feel nervous when i see the pictures of it tilted on just one wheel while turning. I suppose its how id feel if i saw a car roll by me on just 2 wheels LOL. And thank you!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, eddiemoy said:

Lack of fear is what I think it is.  They don’t necessarily learn faster.  It is they they overcome of have no fear, haven’t learned fear yet.  We have to overcome fear to Lear.  Fear of faking, fear of failure, fear of never learning it.  

It is interesting how the mind works and how much it lies to us. 

Yep!! Its less built in resistance to their own potential, so they can tap into more of it, much quicker, where as we kinda have to unlock it and tear down protective walls we've built up to keep ourselves "safe"!

8 hours ago, eddiemoy said:

 learn to recognize the fear and when your mind is lying to you. When you can observe it and be aware of it, you are one step closer being free. Sounds like crazy stuff but most people go through life with zero awareness, a prison in their own mind.  

At least you are atarting to recognize the pattern of the voice in your head. 

Im working on that now! It does sound crazy, but i've faced this in other areas of my life so i know just how real it is and how it can actually be completely crippling if left unchecked. I have a few walls up right now that hopefully I can work through. 

 

8 hours ago, eddiemoy said:

By the way, gear up.  That should take the fear of falling out. 

Mad for the sweating, my theory is that we are using all sorts of muscles to compensate.  Once your brain figures it out, you will stop sweating.  I had the same thing when I was learning. 

Im all geared out! Everything minus the fullface helmet at the moment. Funny though, I messed up my confidence when i went for a bail and the wheel hit the insides of my legs (on both sides) and bruised them. I was going very slowly so it wasnt too hard, but they were already sore from the side pads on the wheel and then i hurt them more and i think that psyched me out, along with making it increasingly difficult for me to hold the weight of the wheel as any pressure was causing me to lose strength. I think i set myself up to fail due to overstepping my own personal limits and practicing for too long is slowly diminishing conditions. From the temperature to my own body, haha. I've learned not to do that now. 

 

8 hours ago, eddiemoy said:

Not to discourage you, but on EUC everything needs to be learned.  Going forward is just the first step. After you are able to go straight, you need to learn turning, turning left is different than turning right.  Turning at high speed is different than turning at low speed.  Mounting without holding a wall, going slow, one legged riding, going backwards, seated riding, jumping, etc.  but all fun after you get the going forward.  

And no worries! I expect this. Once i've gotten the first stage down and can ride comfortably im excited and welcoming the next stages. Its just frustrating to not even get the beginning down. But yeah, i know theres a ton to learn, and that makes it more fun! I'm gonna take my time, ride smart/safe and just keep enjoying this. Also keeping the sessions shorter so i dont kill my own motivation and enjoyment. Its crazzzy how much of a mind challenge this is at the start as well!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, meepmeepmayer said:

That really is true. People ride below walking speed, barely inching forward, and on uneven terrain (that damn grass everyone uses), and then wonder why learning EUCs is so hard.

LOL...oops...... I havent tried on the grass as its all frozen. I may as well eat pavement if i fall on it, lmao! Same sensation. But i have been going slow due to the fear of the power of this thing. It really goes

6 hours ago, meepmeepmayer said:

Nobody would try to learn to ride a bike by going as slowly as possible on grass.

I actually remember trying on grass first. (on my bike). My dad was like "GET ON THE ROAD!" I learned very quick, hahaha.

6 hours ago, meepmeepmayer said:

From easy to hard, the order to learn:

  • Going straight and "fast", like running speed + (easy)
  • Doing curves on pavement, or going slower (a bit harder)
  • Mounting, or going really slow (much harder)

I got PART of the first part down. Going straightish, and fastish...but still no control. Gotta work on that. I had one run where i actually felt like i had control of the wheel, but it also felt like i waas doing the longest squat of all time. A squat on a tightrope as my arms were shooting everywhere. I'll learn. I just have to take my time XD.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

So I'm hoping posting a little progress in here is okay since its so rough (Just filmed on my cell) instead of something nice and polished like whats in the video thread. 

I changed the position of my foot to a bit more forward on the pedals, wore shinguards to protect my aching legs and changed the wheel to experienced mode. I didn't do this to go faster, but just to kinda...react in time with me. Its a bit terrifying because of how fast it takes off so i might go down to medium when i get back outside (Im practicing basic mounting and overall balance and comfort/familiarity with the wheel while im locked inside. Its -8 at the moment and its gonna snow all tomorrow. And im no winterwheel, lol. 

 

Anyways, if anyone sees something from my little training session here that was blatantly jarringly bad, id love to hear! Any and all advice will help me to go from loser to rolling loser! Thank you!

I'm also wondering if im standing a bit too wide on the pedals. I was watching tutorials and it seems everyone is a bit more snug on the pads. During my rides, my wheel shoots all over the place between my legs. If i tighten my stance a little and grip the wheel a little more initially, do you think that will help with the stabilization before getting more speed? (Seems to make sense in theory) I'd test it out, but its 5am and going to be snowing when I wake up. 

Edited by seage
  • Upvote 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 1/6/2019 at 12:35 AM, Major Bathos said:

This is where I still have a problem with. I tend to lock my right leg and make my left leg do most of the work. So right leg straight up and down, left leg bend and loose. I've felt this and realized this is my poor stance but as hard as I try and correct this I instinctually return to this stance as soon as I stop thinking about it. 

Anyone else ride like this? 

Maybe you have scoliosis or one leg is shorter than the other or both, or one created the other.  I have one leg shorter than the other by about 3/4" To prevent me from hopping everywhere on the longer leg, my body has adjusted over time.  To get both feet on the ground my pelvis is tilted and my spine bent a bit.  But I don't feel any of this, as it's been my "normal" forever.  It's only a pain when having new trousers taken up by a tailor.  I have to stress that they don't simple mark one trouser leg and then copy it to the other.  If they do, which they still do, I end up with either one long or one short trouser leg, depending on which one they marked.:angry:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, seage said:

So I'm hoping posting a little progress in here is okay since its so rough (Just filmed on my cell) instead of something nice and polished like whats in the video thread. 

I changed the position of my foot to a bit more forward on the pedals, wore shinguards to protect my aching legs and changed the wheel to experienced mode. I didn't do this to go faster, but just to kinda...react in time with me. Its a bit terrifying because of how fast it takes off so i might go down to medium when i get back outside (Im practicing basic mounting and overall balance and comfort/familiarity with the wheel while im locked inside. Its -8 at the moment and its gonna snow all tomorrow. And im no winterwheel, lol. 

 

Anyways, if anyone sees something from my little training session here that was blatantly jarringly bad, id love to hear! Any and all advice will help me to go from loser to rolling loser! Thank you!

I'm also wondering if im standing a bit too wide on the pedals. I was watching tutorials and it seems everyone is a bit more snug on the pads. During my rides, my wheel shoots all over the place between my legs. If i tighten my stance a little and grip the wheel a little more initially, do you think that will help with the stabilization before getting more speed? (Seems to make sense in theory) I'd test it out, but its 5am and going to be snowing when I wake up. 

Avoid gripping the wheel.  Don’t bother with mounting until you get the forward riding. Use a wall or something to hold on to and mount.  Then push off.  Going from static to moving is hard so the push is helpful.  Stance is very personal.  Stand how ever you feel balanced.  General rule is mass centered over pedals.  For beginner the feet close to the body is easier.  

  • Upvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
11 hours ago, seage said:

 

 

Anyways, if anyone sees something from my little training session here that was blatantly jarringly bad, id love to hear! Any and all advice will help me to go from loser to rolling loser! Thank you!

I'm also wondering if im standing a bit too wide on the pedals. I was watching tutorials and it seems everyone is a bit more snug on the pads. During my rides, my wheel shoots all over the place between my legs. If i tighten my stance a little and grip the wheel a little more initially, do you think that will help with the stabilization before getting more speed? (Seems to make sense in theory) I'd test it out, but its 5am and going to be snowing when I wake up. 

Yeah I see something "blatantly jarringly bad":  If you value that piece of furniture, don't practice so close to it, unless you want to be like the guy who tried to convince his wife those scratches and gouges 6" up the washing machine had always been there :facepalm:.  Other than that, you're doing great.  I wasn't doing that sort of stuff until i was weeks into my practice. You're well on your way to one footed mounts and the elimination of mounting aids.  You will find that one foot mounting really speeds up your practice because you don't have to wheel back to the mounting aid to get back on.

As @eddiemoy said; try not to grip the wheel when practicing.  I know it seems counter intuitive, but gripping the wheel removes several steering options from your arsenal.  Being able to flop the wheel from side to side between your legs,  allow one to make minor directional changes/balance corrections at low speed, thus preventing the need for major directional changes.  The wobbling may seem disconcerting at first, but it quickly becomes one of the weapons in your arsenal of skills.  Watch any experienced rider when he/she has to slow right down to a crawl, and watch this "wobble steer" take over.  Might as well learn it now, you will use it on every ride.

One more thing @eddiemoy said "Use a wall or something to hold on to and mount.  Then push off".  I'm sure he didn't mean to push off with your hand.  When I was using a mounting aid (tree, lamp post, old person), pushing off with my hand introduced an immediate imbalance and wobble, followed sometimes by a dismount.  Simply orient yourself vertically (almost no pressure on the mounting aid) then roll away smoothly, then casually "remove" your hand from the mounting aid.  Eventually the transition will be as smooth as glass.

I don't know which tutorials you have been watching but "snug on the pads" is not the answer.  Yes some people ride like that but it reduces your options, as stated above.  See my recent poll on "to grip or not to grip".

Edited by Smoother
  • Upvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
10 hours ago, seage said:

 

I changed the position of my foot to a bit more forward on the pedals, wore shinguards to protect my aching legs and changed the wheel to experienced mode. I didn't do this to go faster, but just to kinda...react in time with me. Its a bit terrifying because of how fast it takes off so i might go down to medium when i get back outside (Im practicing basic mounting and overall balance and comfort/familiarity with the wheel while im locked inside. Its -8 at the moment and its gonna snow all tomorrow. And im no winterwheel, lol. 

 

Anyways, if anyone sees something from my little training session here that was blatantly jarringly bad, id love to hear! Any and all advice will help me to go from loser to rolling loser! Thank you!

 

I advise practicing how to fully bail from your wheel before learning anything else, as bailing is a neccesary skill that is easy to learn, and you can do it safely indoors in the winter without damaging your place.

--Commit fully to the bail, and do not try to save your wheel. That means don't drag one foot. Either on or off.

--Bend slightly, knees bent, arms well above the waist like you're in a ready basketball stance. This gives you an excellent chance of landing on balance with your shins away from the pedals.

--You might be able to reach down and grab the wheel with one hand post-bail.

Hop on, hop off, and do that a thousand times before learning to ride, and you'll have an excellent chance of avoiding the dreaded pedal to shin hit.

(When I pulled my first wheel out, it felt much heavier and more serious than what I expected. Getting on felt absolutely impossible.)

Edited by LanghamP
  • Like 1
  • Upvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, eddiemoy said:

Avoid gripping the wheel.  Don’t bother with mounting until you get the forward riding. Use a wall or something to hold on to and mount.  Then push off.  Going from static to moving is hard so the push is helpful.  Stance is very personal.  Stand how ever you feel balanced.  General rule is mass centered over pedals.  For beginner the feet close to the body is easier.  

Ah alright. I was doing that outside the other day. Wasn't too comfortable to do it inside yet as I feel all squirley. Im trying to keep what @houseofjobsaid in my mind, about stacking weight directly over the wheel. Ive found even in my stationary practice, a lot of the initial pressure on my joints is beginning to lessen as i find that balance. But i do understand this is going the change the moment i go forward, so i need to prepare for that. I'll find the stance for me one day! 

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Smoother said:

Yeah I see something "blatantly jarringly bad":  If you value that piece of furniture, don't practice so close to it, unless you want to be like the guy who tried to convince his wife those scratches and gouges 6" up the washing machine had always been there :facepalm:.  Other than that, you're doing great.  I wasn't doing that sort of stuff until i was weeks into my practice. You're well on your way to one footed mounts and the elimination of mounting aids.  You will find that one foot mounting really speeds up your practice because you don't have to wheel back to the mounting aid to get back on.

Its an old dresser. If i crash into it, im okay with the damage. But if my family finds out, i'll be crashing into it headfirst, so I'll take your advice. Did said wife believe the tales of the scratched washing machine? Haha! And thank you! I saw a video where a girl was able to kinda float on one foot before gently placing her other on the pedal (while she was learning) and figured that would be a good soft skill to practice while inside. Although space is llimited down here. Why did i have to get into this during the winter? LOL.

3 hours ago, Smoother said:

As @eddiemoy said; try not to grip the wheel when practicing.  I know it seems counter intuitive, but gripping the wheel removes several steering options from your arsenal.  Being able to flop the wheel from side to side between your legs,  allow one to make minor directional changes/balance corrections at low speed, thus preventing the need for major directional changes.  The wobbling may seem disconcerting at first, but it quickly becomes one of the weapons in your arsenal of skills.  Watch any experienced rider when he/she has to slow right down to a crawl, and watch this "wobble steer" take over.  Might as well learn it now, you will use it on every ride.

Ah i see. Okay. Thats one of the bigger problems I had! The wheel just wobbled like mad, but I guess i just need to let my body figure it out. One of the biggest issues I think i had with that was extreme weight shifting. I would basically stomp down with the opposite foot of the fall i was having. Id suddenly lose my nerve and all my weight would go onto my left side. And the pedal would scrape the ground. Then to try to counter it, id push down on my right leg and go over that way, and before i knew it, im bailing because i cant get back upright no matter what. After hearing about the twist, only THEN did i notice that absolutely everyone was doing it. I didn't even see it before in the countless videos i watched. I've been training in the basement to get used to the feeling of twisting my lower body as opposed to stomping on the pedals like a panicked improv riverdance. Hopefully I can burn the action into my subconscious memory because I feel like i was only doing half the things my body wanted to keep me upright. 0 twisting. 

3 hours ago, Smoother said:

One more thing @eddiemoy said "Use a wall or something to hold on to and mount.  Then push off".  I'm sure he didn't mean to push off with your hand.  When I was using a mounting aid (tree, lamp post, old person), pushing off with my hand introduced an immediate imbalance and wobble, followed sometimes by a dismount.  Simply orient yourself vertically (almost no pressure on the mounting aid) then roll away smoothly, then casually "remove" your hand from the mounting aid.  Eventually the transition will be as smooth as glass.

LOL "Old person". I found the same thing, that I was falling when i pushed. Actually, as i was in learn mode, the time between letting go of the wall and actually starting to move, was enough that id lose balance and start wobbling immediately. Im HOPING that the firmness of experienced mode or possibly medium will counter some of that time dipping, as it will catch my weight faster. It felt like id lean in then for a second i actually start to fall then it catches me on a downswing. But by that point im already using my hands and knees and flailing to try to compensate for that moment without any torque, haha. I read a few people mention that learning on experienced helped them so I can only hope.

3 hours ago, Smoother said:

I don't know which tutorials you have been watching but "snug on the pads" is not the answer.  Yes some people ride like that but it reduces your options, as stated above.  See my recent poll on "to grip or not to grip".

I was just looking around in general and wondering what I'd do about my shaky wheel, but I suppose thats less about me vicegripping the wheel, and more about me just finding that balance and relaxed comfort that all the experienced riders talk about.. I'll get there! Now if only i could get outside without freezing to death! 

Thanks @Smoother 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, LanghamP said:

I advise practicing how to fully bail from your wheel before learning anything else, as bailing is a neccesary skill that is easy to learn, and you can do it safely indoors in the winter without damaging your place.

--Commit fully to the bail, and do not try to save your wheel. That means don't drag one foot. Either on or off.

--Bend slightly, knees bent, arms well above the waist like you're in a ready basketball stance. This gives you an excellent chance of landing on balance with your shins away from the pedals.

--You might be able to reach down and grab the wheel with one hand post-bail.

Hop on, hop off, and do that a thousand times before learning to ride, and you'll have an excellent chance of avoiding the dreaded pedal to shin hit.

(When I pulled my first wheel out, it felt much heavier and more serious than what I expected. Getting on felt absolutely impossible.)

This is actually something I was doing outside. In my first ride i was able to jump off and grab the wheel. In the second i was going a bit faster and just let the wheel fall. I did hurt myself when I tried to keep my foot on the pedal to save it and it came back to collect money from my ankles. When doing it indoors do you mean stationary? Ive managed to avoid a dead on shin hit so far, but it smashed into the insides of my legs....the part that keeps the wheel up, haha. Let me tell you how quickly that stopped my practice. I couldnt even hold the wheel upright with my legs as if it touched a side my legs would just give! Haha. 

And yes, thats exactly what I noticed. I think thats when I psyched myself out. I felt the weight on it and was like, oh wow...this is no joke. Then feeling how it moved under my body i was like, wow...this is a beast...did i make a mistake? But im forgetting all that nonsense and just trying to drill these basics while i wait to get back outside!

Thank you for your advice, i will practice this more!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
22 minutes ago, seage said:

This is actually something I was doing outside. In my first ride i was able to jump off and grab the wheel. In the second i was going a bit faster and just let the wheel fall. I did hurt myself when I tried to keep my foot on the pedal to save it and it came back to collect money from my ankles. When doing it indoors do you mean stationary? Ive managed to avoid a dead on shin hit so far, but it smashed into the insides of my legs....the part that keeps the wheel up, haha. Let me tell you how quickly that stopped my practice..

 

Getting injured by an EUC is no joke. I was out for a month with an awful muscle tear where I could not even walk up steps, and that guy from NZ tore his ACL from what looked to be a minor fall. Wheels behave predictably yet counterintuitively, and so you need to experiment a bit so you don't land awkwardly.

Especially if you bail off from the front of the wheel, you need to step strongly off one foot or the other so the wheel doesn't ram your Achilles or heel. Stepping off with one foot unbalances the wheel so it drops onto the ground instead of rolling until it hits something (you).

Just hop on the wheel for .5 seconds, then hop off, again and again.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@seage this is all very good!,

It seems like you are understanding the principles of mounting (downward force of the mount leg on pedal counterbalanced by the perpendicular force of the shin against the leg pad / wheel body) which is usually what beginners learn last.

Some small fixes / pointers:

- get the wheel more under your body by slightly bending your mount leg inwards (I usually reference the Stanky Leg LOL) so that the other, unmounted pedal is closer to your ground foot. This will also make it easier to get the trailing mount foot on eventually.

- For the initial mount and these one-foot-on, one-foot-on-the-ground exercises, your body should be primarily over your mount leg / tilted wheel body, as that is the center plane of mass for balancing. Think of a skater mounting to kick-push a board. Once they are ready to push off, they will get the majority of their body over their mount leg for stability to push off on. Same concept for EUC. 

For a lesson in what Not to do, just look at any video where people bail mounting a skateboard or 'hoverboard'. They all bail because they keep their weight still over the ground leg, which creates great instability and the inevitable 'pulling the rug from under you' effect.

- Feet position will be tricky as a beginner learning balance, but just know, regardless of how the wheel pedals are designed, your feet should be as close to shoulder with apart as possible, even if the foot hangs off the pedal. Almost every sport teaches shoulder width feet for stability, and EUC is no different IMHO. If you are not able to adjust your feet in the beginning post-mount, at the very least, try to keep your feet away from hugging the wheel body as others have stated here.

 

Lastly, I know you're anxious to get going, but having an obstacle free area will help, learn better; less restriction and interruption in movement.

Keep at it!

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you want to get the wobble under control, simply stand on the wheel (using something to steady yourself) and without trying to go anywhere, just stand there and wobble the wheel left and right.  Don't get all extreme, just a few inches either side of vertical will do.  Being comfortable with it and controlling it, is the key.  After that, forward motion is a simple addition to the process.

Also, I do think training in confined spaces is more difficult.  Out in a wide open space you can free-ride further even if you can't steer properly, because you have  room to let it wander while you try to learn how to steer.  I would go out in tomorrow's snow if I were you.  Snow is quite grippy and it doesn't hurt as much when you fall. There's video of Chooch riding in fresh snow, somewhere, he was having fun.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, houseofjob said:

 this is all very good!,

It seems like you are understanding the principles of mounting (downward force of the mount leg on pedal counterbalanced by the perpendicular force of the shin against the leg pad / wheel body) which is usually what beginners learn last.

Thank you! I'm trying to make the most of this unfortunate weather by studying ahead a bit, haha. 

7 hours ago, houseofjob said:

Some small fixes / pointers:

- get the wheel more under your body by slightly bending your mount leg inwards (I usually reference the Stanky Leg LOL) so that the other, unmounted pedal is closer to your ground foot. This will also make it easier to get the trailing mount foot on eventually.

Lmfao! Wow, that really just happened. Alright, i'll use the stankyleg technique. So I guess i just have the wheel tilted, so with this i'll be bringing my knee in closer to my other knee, right? So a tighter (less wide) stance, but similar angle on the wheel without just letting it tip with my leg leaving the side, if im getting it right?

7 hours ago, houseofjob said:

- For the initial mount and these one-foot-on, one-foot-on-the-ground exercises, your body should be primarily over your mount leg / tilted wheel body, as that is the center plane of mass for balancing. Think of a skater mounting to kick-push a board. Once they are ready to push off, they will get the majority of their body over their mount leg for stability to push off on. Same concept for EUC. 

Everytime ive tried to do this, its felt so heavy trying to keep the wheel on that one leg. Its always pulled against me and hurt my leg as the wheel tilts over towards the mounted leg. Is that just because im not in balance yet? Sometimes id tilt too much and it would go straight and then start falling the other way. That also hurt. Im guessing im supposed to find a balance to hold the wheel sideways, right? Because in theory i totally understand what you mean. Having my weight on the wheel, and pushing with the other foot, which i can then smoothly lift and place on the pedal or board. But in this case, because theres so much weight on that leg, it always makes me fall either towards the foot on the ground, or out and i topple over the other side XD.

 

7 hours ago, houseofjob said:

- Feet position will be tricky as a beginner learning balance, but just know, regardless of how the wheel pedals are designed, your feet should be as close to shoulder with apart as possible, even if the foot hangs off the pedal. Almost every sport teaches shoulder width feet for stability, and EUC is no different IMHO. If you are not able to adjust your feet in the beginning post-mount, at the very least, try to keep your feet away from hugging the wheel body as others have stated here.

Ah okay. That works for me. I'll try to get to that position. Its so funny. Everytime I feel like ive had an "aha!" moment, everyones like "Yeah, you probably dont wanna do that" and im back to the drawing board, loll

 

7 hours ago, houseofjob said:

Lastly, I know you're anxious to get going, but having an obstacle free area will help, learn better; less restriction and interruption in movement.

Keep at it!

You're right. Tonight its freezing rain, but tomorrow is supposed to be "warm" (Less freezing) so if the ice melts i'll try to get out there. But yeah, practicing in my basement probably isnt gonna help me too much in the longrun outside of the basic standing still and getting used to back and forth motions. I'll film again once I get outside. 

 

Thank you so much for all your advice. I really appreciate you helping me with issues that are probably pretty redundant! 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, LanghamP said:

Getting injured by an EUC is no joke. I was out for a month with an awful muscle tear where I could not even walk up steps, and that guy from NZ tore his ACL from what looked to be a minor fall. Wheels behave predictably yet counterintuitively, and so you need to experiment a bit so you don't land awkwardly.

Yikes. I hope you've fully recovered from that! I think im gonna start stretching before I ride....seems to be safer after reading this, geez.

7 hours ago, LanghamP said:

Especially if you bail off from the front of the wheel, you need to step strongly off one foot or the other so the wheel doesn't ram your Achilles or heel. Stepping off with one foot unbalances the wheel so it drops onto the ground instead of rolling until it hits something (you).

Just hop on the wheel for .5 seconds, then hop off, again and again.

I learned AFTER it ate my ankles about getting the heck outta there. But by that point it was a bit late XD. Hasnt happened since but that was a painful lesson. But the step off thing i didnt know! Thank you, i will use that. 

And okay, i'll do the hop to practice while im stuck inside with this awful weather! 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, Smoother said:

If you want to get the wobble under control, simply stand on the wheel (using something to steady yourself) and without trying to go anywhere, just stand there and wobble the wheel left and right.  Don't get all extreme, just a few inches either side of vertical will do.  Being comfortable with it and controlling it, is the key.  After that, forward motion is a simple addition to the process.

Im gonna put on some music and do just that. Just chill out, relax my body and get more used to standing on this thing. I need to kill this discomfort and nervousness i feel whenever it comes to being on the wheel. Im surprised I hate it this bad, but i have to admit that intimidation is there. 

7 hours ago, Smoother said:

Also, I do think training in confined spaces is more difficult.  Out in a wide open space you can free-ride further even if you can't steer properly, because you have  room to let it wander while you try to learn how to steer.  I would go out in tomorrow's snow if I were you.  Snow is quite grippy and it doesn't hurt as much when you fall. There's video of Chooch riding in fresh snow, somewhere, he was having fun.

That seems to be the consensus. I was going to go out in the snow before it changed to freezing rain. Hoping it will melt tomorrow and i can check out a parking lot in the city. I need to search for a park or something flat. Theres almost nowhere ideal to learn here. I saw the video of chooch, and also one of winterwheel and some people from russia on youtube tearing through the snow. Looked really awesome.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, seage said:

Lmfao! Wow, that really just happened. Alright, i'll use the stankyleg technique. So I guess i just have the wheel tilted, so with this i'll be bringing my knee in closer to my other knee, right? So a tighter (less wide) stance, but similar angle on the wheel without just letting it tip with my leg leaving the side, if im getting it right?

Yes, exactly, knees closer together, unmounted pedal tilted and almost touching the ground, all next to your unmounted standing ground foot.

The stance is only less wide because you haven't fully mounted and the wheel is at a tilt; effective pedal-to-pedal distance is reduced, as opposed to when you are riding, where the pedals are the widest, perfectly parallel / level with the ground.

And LOL, the Stanky leg is only to reference your leg is in that slight unnatural, inward bend position.... you shouldn't sweep your leg far out like the Stanky leg though, haha.

 

2 hours ago, seage said:

Everytime ive tried to do this, its felt so heavy trying to keep the wheel on that one leg. Its always pulled against me and hurt my leg as the wheel tilts over towards the mounted leg. Is that just because im not in balance yet? Sometimes id tilt too much and it would go straight and then start falling the other way. That also hurt. Im guessing im supposed to find a balance to hold the wheel sideways, right? Because in theory i totally understand what you mean. Having my weight on the wheel, and pushing with the other foot, which i can then smoothly lift and place on the pedal or board. But in this case, because theres so much weight on that leg, it always makes me fall either towards the foot on the ground, or out and i topple over the other side XD.

Hmmmm.... yes, your shin might be tender, not used to the pressure of practicing mounting.

In reality, the mount-to-upright-riding transition is brief, so the brief pressure is alleviated when you are mounted and rolling, because your legs ideally should not be hugging the cushions at all while riding, only kissing or slight lean of the outside turn leg on pad when doing more sharper turns.

I'd say don't go overboard with the one-leg-on-one-leg-off practicing, and save it for outside, where you can mount into longer riding.

Edited by houseofjob

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, houseofjob said:

Yes, exactly, knees closer together, unmounted pedal tilted and almost touching the ground, all next to your unmounted standing ground foot.

The stance is only less wide because you haven't fully mounted and the wheel is at a tilt; effective pedal-to-pedal distance is reduced, as opposed to when you are riding, where the pedals are the widest, perfectly parallel / level with the ground.

And LOL, the Stanky leg is only to reference your leg is in that slight unnatural, inward bend position.... you shouldn't sweep your leg far out like the Stanky leg though, haha.

I just filmed a little thing to try it out. Also stood on there for a while and got used to stationary balance and getting out of the habit of leaning heavy from side to side like @Smoother mentioned. Before i was flying all over the place even staying still. But indeed, this will be my last video from my basement. I'll be trying to get outside asap.

 

3 hours ago, houseofjob said:

Hmmmm.... yes, your shin might be tender, not used to the pressure of practicing mounting.

In reality, the mount-to-upright-riding transition is brief, so the brief pressure is alleviated when you are mounted and rolling, because your legs ideally should not be hugging the cushions at all while riding, only kissing or slight lean of the outside turn leg on pad when doing more sharper turns.

I'd say don't go overboard with the one-leg-on-one-leg-off practicing, and save it for outside, where you can mount into longer riding.

Yeah, it was pretty bad, but the pain has almost completely gone away now, even when i hold the wheel with my leg, so i think the conditioning is working! And i see. That makes sense that you wouldnt really linger. It would be a quick step up then go, with the pressure off of both legs. But yeah. Relaxing on that for now and gonna head outside hopefully today in the morning for a little roll around, if i can find a location

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, seage said:

I just filmed a little thing to try it out. Also stood on there for a while and got used to stationary balance and getting out of the habit of leaning heavy from side to side like @Smoother mentioned. Before i was flying all over the place even staying still.

In the video, from about 35 seconds, you were essentially riding.   OK so you weren't actually going anywhere, but other than the wind in your face and the scenery changing, that is what a gentle cruise would feel like.  Those little wobbles would be induced by you to correct your path and steer, because due to a process known as gyroscopic precession as you lean a rotating mass the mass turns in that direction (standing still there is no gyro precession).  So a little lean to the left would also turn the wheel to the left, with no other input from you.  Actually once you calm down a bit this imaginary cruise would be almost straight ahead with no side to side wobbling necessary. I really think the worst beginner instruction EVER is "twist the wheel to turn".  All experienced riders can twist the wheel, but as a beginner it is senseless.I can't remember the last time I actively twisted the wheel, except for practicing on the spot 180's.  Simply lean the wheel (when its moving) and it will turn, and it will turn very sharply if you lean it a lot; which you can't do if your legs are snugged up tight against the shell/pads.

Go upstairs, find something to mount from and lean on,  that is in view of your television, get up on your wheel and just stand there getting comfortable, while watching one of your shows.  Protect the floor if necessary.  Make little wobbles, move forward and backward a few inches. You'll become comfortable up there in no time.

Edited by Smoother

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

@Smoother FYI, the twist tip was more for staying on the wheel longer, for beginners early on having issue staying on the wheel long enough to ride in a straight line, legs usually too locked to even think about attempting to turn.

 

@seage yup, position is waaaay better!

Edited by houseofjob

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, houseofjob said:

@Smoother FYI, the twist tip was more for staying on the wheel longer, for beginners early on having issue staying on the wheel long enough to ride in a straight line, legs usually too locked to even think about attempting to turn.

Yes I agree. I was thinking specifically of that training video (Solowheel I believe) where newbs were told swivel to steer.  Female rider oriental, possibly  american accent, possibly Solowheel inventer's daughter.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×