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Thai-lad

United Airlines and EUCs

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Presumably having a doctor's prescription for the PED would help tremendously. 

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4 hours ago, LanghamP said:

Presumably having a doctor's prescription for the PED would help tremendously. 

Not required, but could save you getting charged an excess baggage fee for a recreational use PED.

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On 11/9/2018 at 1:42 AM, LanghamP said:

Presumably having a doctor's prescription for the PED would help tremendously. 

From the Americans with Disabilities website:

Credible Assurance

drawing of a store employee having a conversation with a man using a Segway<sup>®</sup>An entity that determines it can accommodate one or more types of OPDMDs in its facility is allowed to ask the person using the device to provide credible assurance that the device is used because of a disability. If the person presents a valid, State-issued disability parking placard or card or a State-issued proof of disability, that must be accepted as credible assurance on its face. If the person does not have this documentation, but states verbally that the OPDMD is being used because of a mobility disability, that also must be accepted as credible assurance, unless the person is observed doing something that contradicts the assurance. For example, if a person is observed running and jumping, that may be evidence that contradicts the person's assertion of a mobility disability. However, it is very important for covered entities and their staff to understand that the fact that a person with a disability is able to walk for a short distance does not necessarily contradict a verbal assurance -- many people with mobility disabilities can walk, but need their mobility device for longer distances or uneven terrain. This is particularly true for people who lack stamina, have poor balance, or use mobility devices because of respiratory, cardiac, or neurological disabilities. A covered entity cannot ask people about their disabilities.

 

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As to the question, are EUCs legitimately OPDMDs, the answer is clearly yes, from the last line of the following:

 

People with mobility, circulatory, respiratory, or neurological disabilities use many kinds of devices for mobility. Some use walkers, canes, crutches, or braces. Some use manual or power wheelchairs or electric scooters. In addition, advances in technology have given rise to new devices, such as Segways®, that some people with disabilities use as mobility devices... And more advanced devices will inevitably be invented, providing more mobility options for people with disabilities.

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That's bullshit, if you have a disability then I wanna see papers, because I'm tired of all these ill-trained comfort dogs barking at me throughout the flight, or in a restaurant.

If you really want it then you gotta put some skin in the game. That means, to me, a semi-legitimate reason for mobility or comfort. And yes I would consider "too lazy to walk up San Francisco hills" or "I cannot find a dogsitter" as semi-legitimate, but jeez pay the $50 to have an official looking paper. We're Germans, damnit!

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Good Luck by bringing an EUC onto a passenger plane!

No matter if you have any disabilitiy papers or not! It just will not happen. And to be honest:

I dont want that to happen, also! There is a reason why LiIon batteries are banned! They allready brought down 1-2 planes, and reme,ber the new dreamliner taken down worldwide... So nope, you will not go ariund this that easily!

 

Also 90% of all international carriers in the meantime have a policy:

NO self balancing vehicle AT ALL on their flights...no matter if with or without battery and no matter what battery size, they are just forbidden! I allready experiences that myself when trying to bring an EMPTY Euc on board ....no chance at all.

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The FAA apparently relaxed their guidelines earlier this year in regard to flying with batteries in mobilty vehicles, probably to comply with ADA regulations.  Likewise, Li-Ion batteries can apparenty again be shipped on passenger planes in open palletized form.   The danger warnings appear to be limitted to prohibiting bulk shipments in sealed containers.  I haven't gone to the FAA website to read the rules directly, just going by the info on United's site.

 

As UAL is a major partner in the Star Alliance with codeshare agreements in place with a large percentage of the world's biggest airlines, I would expect the same rules will be adopted by all of them.  It would otherwise create chaos for disabled passengers on international flights utilizing craft being flown by different carriers after stopovers.

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1 hour ago, LanghamP said:

That's bullshit, if you have a disability then I wanna see papers, because I'm tired of all these ill-trained comfort dogs barking at me throughout the flight, or in a restaurant.

If you really want it then you gotta put some skin in the game. That means, to me, a semi-legitimate reason for mobility or comfort. And yes I would consider "too lazy to walk up San Francisco hills" or "I cannot find a dogsitter" as semi-legitimate, but jeez pay the $50 to have an official looking paper. We're Germans, damnit!

Having documentation will certainly make things go more smoothly.  But it's not a legal requirement.

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"the battery must be removed and cannot exceed 300 watt hours."
Most EUCs out then...

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21 minutes ago, Jean Dublin said:

"the battery must be removed and cannot exceed 300 watt hours."
Most EUCs out then...

Read the first post again

 On non-collapsible devices the battery does NOT need to be removed and there is NO restriction on battery size.

This is from United's own website.

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I wonder if that overrides the IATA rules about self balancing devices.

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5 minutes ago, Jean Dublin said:

I wonder if that overrides the IATA rules about self balancing devices.

No idea if it will apply to connecting flights on other carriers.  Best to enquire with United if that's your situation. 

I honestly think it could be easier to gate check a Monster or KS18s as they are rideable seated :P

I would mod mine to add an ignition key lock if it couldn't be software locked.  

It might be necessary to remove all but one battery pack from the device, to technically meet the requirements. That's the only gotcha I can see.

Edited by Thai-lad
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What the FAA says;

 

(17) A wheelchair or other mobility aid equipped with a lithium ion battery, when carried as checked baggage, provided—

(i) The lithium ion battery must be of a type that successfully passed each test in the UN Manual of Tests and Criteria (IBR; see §171.7 of this subchapter), as specified in §173.185 of this subchapter, unless approved by the Associate Administrator;

(ii) The operator must verify that:

(A) Visual inspection of the wheelchair or other mobility aid reveals no obvious defects;

(B) Battery terminals are protected from short circuits (e.g., enclosed within a battery housing);

(C) The battery must be securely attached to the mobility aid; and

(D) Electrical circuits are isolated;

(iii) The wheelchair or other mobility aid must be loaded and stowed in such a manner to prevent its unintentional activation and its battery must be protected from short circuiting;

(iv) The wheelchair or other mobility aid must be protected from damage by the movement of baggage, mail, service items, or other cargo;

(v) Where a lithium ion battery-powered wheelchair or other mobility aid is specifically designed to allow its battery to be removed by the user (e.g., collapsible):

(A) The battery must be removed from the wheelchair or other mobility aid according to instructions provided by the wheelchair or other mobility aid owner or its manufacturer;

 

So, the gotcha here is, did the batteries pass the tests listed??

The lithium ion battery must be of a type that successfully passed each test in the UN Manual of Tests and Criteria (IBR; see §171.7 of this subchapter), as specified in §173.185 of this subchapter

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A key concern of airlines is that the device doesn't accidentally turn on when jostled by other baggage in the hold.  This has caused fires in the past, and is probably why hoverboards are not generally accepted.  There's no sure way for airlines to know if they are able to be accidentally activated.  Hence modding your device with an ignition key interlock will go a long way to making it acceptable to the airline.  

From a UK notice, but highlights the airlines' point of view:

Safety Notice SN-2012/003 - Civil Aviation Authority
 

The means of inhibiting circuits to prevent the accidental activation of electric mobility aids vary. Most scooters have a key which can be switched to the off position, removed and given to the passenger for safe keeping. However, most power chairs are switched on and off with a 
push-button which could be reactivated in flight by the inadvertent movement of baggage or cargo. Accordingly, further steps are required to inhibit the circuits of such devices.

Edited by Thai-lad

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