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My V10F dismantling


Nils
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49 minutes ago, meepmeepmayer said:

:thumbup::clap3:Great post. Especially the last sentence.

I wouldn't use any Loktite. Tried it with my pedal screws, and regretted it. It's unnecessary even there, and a bitch to open. Applied to the internal screws, I'd be worried it would destroy the screw holes on the next disassembly.

Well, we'll see I guess, and it would also depend on what strength you use. For what it's worth the screws had loctite on them (or whatever similar thing they've used) when I unscrewed them,  so I chose to reapply some for those screws when reinserting them again.

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1 hour ago, Harold Farrenkopf said:

No loctite provided in kit. What loctite number did you use? Will need to get some. Thanks. 

I used the blue one, medium strength. My version doesn't have a number on it, but looking around it seems like it would be 243 (and I believe 242 was an older formula). But apply it at your own risk, perhaps @meepmeepmayer is right about it causing issues, the blue one is designed so that you should be able to loosen it with hand tools though. The purple one is weaker if you're concerned about that aspect.

Edited by Nils
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If it helps you, I used (not too much of) 243 and had to pry open my pedal screws with hammering and whatnot, it was pretty tight. It the thread was a metal insert in a piece of plastic, it would likely have broken out.

The less likely it is you will ever disassemble anything, the more you might just loktite it. But in general, I think Loktite just isn't very necessary, maybe check/tighten the screws once a year (and check the pedal ones every 2 months) and that's fine.

I guess it's a matter of personal taste. Nothing wrong with Loktite either:efee47c9c8: I would recommend using the weakest thread locker available, if you use one. That should easily do the job.

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Do not recommend loctite threadlocker on plastic. It should only be used for metal to metal parts. From http://www.loctiteproducts.com/p/t_lkr_blue/overview/Loctite-Threadlocker-Blue-242.htm 

Not Recommended For

  • Use on plastic parts, particularly thermoplastic materials where stress cracking of the plastic could result

It sounds hokey, but if it's a metal screw going into plastic, use white or wood glue instead.

Edited by Elder Meat
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14 minutes ago, Elder Meat said:

Do not recommend loctite threadlocker on plastic. It should only be used for metal to metal parts. From http://www.loctiteproducts.com/p/t_lkr_blue/overview/Loctite-Threadlocker-Blue-242.htm 

Not Recommended For

  • Use on plastic parts, particularly thermoplastic materials where stress cracking of the plastic could result

It sounds hokey, but if it's a metal screw going into plastic, use white or wood glue instead.

I would fully expect the screw holes to have metal inserts, so it would be metal-to-metal. I can't see any EUC being manufactured without using machine screws into proper metal inserts that have been molded into the case.

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8 hours ago, FreeRide said:

I would fully expect the screw holes to have metal inserts, so it would be metal-to-metal. I can't see any EUC being manufactured without using machine screws into proper metal inserts that have been molded into the case.

Right you are, there are metal inserts for at least most of these screws. If I recall correctly there were also some smaller ones that might have gone into plastic directly, but one should be able to tell, and you can also see clearly on the screws whether there were thread lock there previously. I only applied loctite to the screws where there were previously some.

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Screws that have preapplied threadlocker (easily seen as solid blue coating on the screw itself) are different than the liquid stuff. The issue isn't the threadlocking material, it's the carrier liquid that's designed to penetrate thin cracks and will attack thermoplastics. If you think you can apply a meaningful amount of liquid loctite in such a way that it only comes into contact with the screw and screw insert threads, and not any of the surrounding plastic, then more power to you.

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