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Lifespan of EUC?


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It's a question I've wondered too.

First of all, both miles and years is a poor way of measuring any vehicle.

Secondly, I suspect hours, while better, is also a poor way.

I propose, instead, cumulative watts pushed through the wheel as the best measure of wear and tear on these vehicles.

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9 minutes ago, The Fat Unicyclist said:

I've replaced the shells on my wheel three times, the batteries four times, the motor twice and the tyre five times, and it still goes like new.

I think these wheels are indestructible - they last forever!!!   ;)

Dude, you have built at least three new EUCs in replacement parts! How many miles and how long have you owned that EUC?

Oh and: 

 

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13 minutes ago, The Fat Unicyclist said:

I've replaced the shells on my wheel three times, the batteries four times, the motor twice and the tyre five times, and it still goes like new.

I think these wheels are indestructible - they last forever!!!   ;)

Is this your IPS Lhotz? Any idea on total mileage?

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As with everything it probably boils down to how well you look after it. I only own the IPS Elite Zero but it has been serving me very well so far, I´ve been commuting shorter distances almost daily for some 2-3 years, other than cosmetic issues like scratches it still runs fine. It has fallen over a few times when I was learning to ride, and I had to disembark once after an emergency break that left me sitting on the pavement and sending it flying down a slope, it was still holding up well (I landed on my butt without getting hurt in any way). I changed the inner tube recently due to a metal pin puncture and managed to also remove a lot of old dust in the case. It was a while since I checked the app but if i recall it was then above 1111 Km range. I dont really notice any reduced performance battery-wise either, it is a tiny 260Wh but I often charge it when it sits at 40-50% after "resting" for a while. 

 

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I am always wondering about this. is it bad to keep the EUC plugged in when it is not in use? I also heard that it is better to not charge the battery beyond 80% to extend life, does that really make a difference?

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54 minutes ago, Hsiang said:

I am always wondering about this. is it bad to keep the EUC plugged in when it is not in use? I also heard that it is better to not charge the battery beyond 80% to extend life, does that really make a difference?

It makes a huge difference in number of cycles, ie longevity, see http://hobby16.neowp.fr/category/batteries-en/

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8 hours ago, esaj said:
9 hours ago, The Fat Unicyclist said:

I've replaced the shells on my wheel three times, the batteries four times, the motor twice and the tyre five times, and it still goes like new.

I think these wheels are indestructible - they last forever!!!   ;)

Is this your IPS Lhotz? Any idea on total mileage?

No, sorry... This was meant as a joke - that replacing it part by part makes it last forever.

I'm not sure of the mileage of my Lhotz (must check). But I can tell you that it really could do with some new shells - I have let too many people learn with it, and the scars are getting pretty deep.

In fact, I may just be retiring it... Tomorrow (when a package or two arrive).

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Mileage? My 16S had it's first issue at 8000km, it snapped a bolt. Lighter than 95kg, don't like offroad, better luck? The 1€ bolt will last a lot longer.

Time? Performance and features of new models will get to you... You'll just want to buy a new wheel.

Choice? Most end up using the wheel for more and longer trips than intended. Cue switch to a bigger wheel and a larger battery.

Technical? Lifespan is very long. Battery is the first that goes, so it is worth learning the proper practices, like 15min rest bef/aft charge, and prefer the 40-80% range.

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22 hours ago, Torsten Daerr said:

I bought my Ninebot One in July 2015, have covered more than 2200km with it since and just replaced the tire and pipe tube. 

Replaced the tyre and tube with 22" versions...
Replaced the motor with a Gotway Monster motor...
And quadrupled the battery capacity...

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On 8/8/2018 at 10:20 AM, Circuitmage said:

Tire seems to be the thing I'm worried about. Have been riding various EUC's for just over a year now and not done a tire change. I have over 1300 miles on my 16S, and tire is starting to show some flattening.

I was compelled to change my tire on my KS16S around the 3000 mile marker. I bought the exact same replacement tire for $20 but I could not find the replacement innertube.

There's several YouTube videos; I suggest going through them several times imagining the steps as EUC tire changes are not quick nor straightforward like bicycle tires; if you were really determined and had a CO2 cartridge you can probably change a bicycle tire in under a minute, at some significant risk to damaging your rim with the tire levers.

Interestingly, with the new tire on I found it quite difficult to ride the EUC, presumably because I was used to the slower handling the flat spot gave the EUC, but I found the grip to be significantly better. I'm guessing I rode my old tire well into the danger zone.

I took the opportunity to to completely clean out the wheel. There was a lot of dog shit (can I say that on this forum?) up inside the case, and I just scooped up that shit with my bare hands, then Clorox and pine soled that area until it was completely and absolutely spotless.

Also cleaned and oiled the handle and trolley. Mine was slightly sticky at the latch mechanism, in the rear, presumably because the wheel kicks up fine dirt that gets into the back latch.

I also peeled back and replaced the grip tape.

I'm unsure how long these wheels last. Parts definitely wear out but replacement parts are quite cheap. I would guess over the long run an EUC, surprisingly, would be much cheaper than almost any bicycle if you did your own maintenance, and incomparably cheaper if you hired a bicycle mechanic. I love bicycles but they have a lot of moving parts that need to be replaced. Perhaps more importantly, crashes on EUC just seem to damage the <cheap> shell whereby bicycle are godawful expensive, especially if the wheel, fork, and head get knocked such as misstiming a curb jump.

I would guess that, hand down, a mid-range EUC is the most cost-effective form of transportation; bicycles might be cheaper with the initial cost but over a year or longer the bicycle will need replacement parts. My $1100 bicycle has so far consumed over $300 in replacement parts just to go 2000 miles and that doesn't yet include the Alfine 8 speed hub that's past due.

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