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Evaluating EUC Specs.


Jerome
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I don't believe in reinventing the wheel. I also know that taking "most" manufacturer specs. as a comparison basis is an exercise in futility. These two factors led me to eWheels comparative charts. They are an excellent starting point as they are based on Jason's personal experience and customer feedback. Even so they obviously can't take in the enumerable permutations/combinations of rider weight, riding style, riding terrain, and riding conditions. I interpret or enhance the chart as follows:

Recommended weight - This tells me how powerful the wheel is and how strong is the axle. 

Recommended Maximum Speed - This tells me how fast one can ride without significant tilt-back.

Range - if one is ~ <= 75 kg and rides on a generally flat flat route in  temperatures 55 deg F or above.

If one rides fast, figure on 15% less Range (fast is ~ 90-% or more of Recommended Maximum Speed)

If one is heavy 100Kg and up, figure 20% or less of range

If one rides in hilly terrain, figure 25% or less Range

If one rides in the cold, figure 30% or less Range

Applying the above: I am ~ 110 kg in weight, I ride fast for the E+ but but average for the larger wheels

9B E+ app says full charge range is 17 miles.       

- 15% fast, -20 weight, = -5.9 miles

~ 11 miles estimated range

Actual 10 miles

I would therefore expect to get: V8 =?? (over the weight limit), KS16S 26 miles, Tesla = 32 miles, V10F = 30 miles, MSuper S3+ = 50 miles

The above is about as scientific as an QUIJA Board, but I wonder how it measures up to the your real-world experiences?

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I agree, a lot of the info I'm waiting for before dropping money on a wheel seems to be unavailable. I'm terrified to spend 2K CAD and end up not totally loving the feel of my wheel by virtue that the distinctions between manufacturers and models may be subtle with characteristics that are hard to quantify or describe.

Comparative charts would go a long way. I really like the idea of the chart on ewheels but you're right, they are too basic.

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A crucial thing that’s missing is: where does the range end? If you want to ride to the very last drop, the last 7 miles are going to lack most things that makes riding fun, and for the last 3, even worthwhile. You’re not going to plan your trips purposefully with a snail section as a climax...

Edited by mrelwood
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4 hours ago, mrelwood said:

A crucial thing that’s missing is: where does the range end? If you want to ride to the very last drop, the last 7 miles are going to lack most things that makes riding fun, and for the last 3, even worthwhile. You’re not going to plan your trips purposefully with a snail section as a climax...

Agreed! Range to me is up to the point where I can maintain at least 80% of my riding speed and climbing ability. The actual "enjoyable" range therefore would be 80% of the last drop range. It seems most wheels are good enough up to about 20% remaining battery power.  

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