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EUC

Found 7 results

  1. Hi all, I recently bought a used Solowheel Xtreme. Rode it for about 20 minutes, then sparks came out of it and it stopped running. Took it apart to find that the metal snapped where one of the pedals (crank arm) is supposed to attach to the axle. The main thick cable (I assume to motor cable) also got cut since it goes through the crank arm. I am confident I can rewire the thick cable, but to do that it seems I have to get inside the motor. To get inside the motor, I would probably either have to remove the crank that is still attached to the axle, or possibly remove the material on the side of the wheel. Anyone know how to do this? Also, anyone know of a source for a new axle/crank assembly? It looks like the Solowheel Xtreme is not manufactured any longer. Attaching photos of what the damage looks like.
  2. Alright, after a couple years of owning the SoloWheel Xtreme, and many other electric unicycles, I gotta say, by far, that the Solowheel is the most difficult to ride, by a very large margin. There is no doubt in my mind that anyone used to riding hard settings on wheels such as GotWay models and similar would not be able to ride my Solowheel, at all. Why? Well it's simple, the MASSIVE lean. Accelerating/decelerating, my body leans 45 degrees! Compared to my Gotways which have no lean while moving. Or with King Song which has only like a 5 degree lean, no more. My Xtreme is very weak compared to my other wheels, such as the GW Mten3 and the GW Monster, but believe me, riding the Xtreme is SCARY. Oh boy... It leans like a motherfucker! Jumping down curbs with this wheel is just off the table.
  3. According to SoloWheel Xtreme printed specs on the pedal, it has a 160Wh battery. That means it is air travel worthy. What are the odds that airport security would prevent me from boarding?! (plane ticket is way cheaper than wheel, I rather miss the flight!) If you have traveled with electric unicycles, please share your experience! I took a picture of the printed data on my SoloWheel Xtreme's pedal:
  4. I bought an Xtreme several weeks ago and have noticed when I climb hills or ride hard/fast it starts to vibrate hard for a few seconds repeatedly until I turn it off. Then it works fine on restarting it until pushed again. Any thoughts?
  5. Alright, I know many are frowning at the title. Allow me explain its purpose... I feel like our little futuristic extreme sport doesn't yet have a completely established name for riders, in the way that there are "Sk8er" and "Cyclists", etc. The term EUC'ers is not common outside the forum and facebook group. What do we want to be known as? Because let's face it, these machines will never be mainstream. They are harder to learn than skateboards, and quite significantly more dangerous than bicycles. We have our own rebel culture to develop, which we are all doing everytime we go outside (knowingly or not). Discuss!
  6. Real world stats as tested by 140 lbs rider at 100 ft elevation, 55F degree weather with 12+ mph winds, and 45psi tire: Battery Range: 13 miles (21 km) in uneven road/sidewalk surfaces with constant incline changes. Non-stop riding.Max Speed: 12 mph (on leveled 180 degrees surface)Max climbing incline: ~60 degrees (tested in off-road hill)Unexpected power cutoffs: NONEMax charge time: 2 hrs(now post yours)
  7. I wanted to install my bike computer more permanently with a nicely hidden wire, so I opened up my Solowheel Xtreme partially; here is how to take it apart. (Disclaimer: this may void your warranty and/or break your wheel. Do it at your own risk!! Also, I just tried this out -- there may be a better way or order to it) 1. Unscrew the top handle and the screw in the rubber charger connector; after this you can remove the top black padding by shifting it upward (and slightly pressing in). (and ignore the bike computer ) 2. In the picture below, the red circles show where the black padding hooks went in. When putting it back, be careful not to catch any wires. Wow, very neat wire arrangement, even with markings. Most wires were also neatly attached with 'heat glue'. It may help to have a heat glue device yourself to re-attach if necessary (about $8,-). And we see the advantage of a double shell: the wires are on the outside and there are no holes exposed where dirt and water can come in (from the inside). Below, I also unscrewed the blue and red displays -- and unplugged the charger wire (part of it is in the black shell). 3. unscrew the 5 shell screws on the sides; I used a piece of tape to remember where each screw belongs. Note, only unscrew one side -- see next why. Actually, In the above photo I turned the wheel around which is not necessary. And you need to turn it again, such that the "CE" marked wheel pad is up. But first unscrew on both sides the 7 big screws on the vertical bars above the pads. Actually, if you only need access to the tire, then you should not remove the shell that contains the control wire and can leave in the 7 big screws on that side (the side that does not have CE label pad). 4. Now, carefully turn the wheel as the shell is loose now. Make sure the "CE" marked pad is up. Then carefully turn the top shell around the top of the wheel. 5. Again, note how I use tape to remember where all screws came from. Such neat design: the inside shell is completely dust/water proof -- no holes are exposed. Because we unscrewed only one side of the shell in the beginning, the square metal bars are now attached to one side of the shells: If we would have screwed off both sides, the bars would all come loose. 6. Now we are ready to remove the wheel -- but the other side has the thick wire that controls the wheel motor inside the wheel. Actually, this step should only be done if necessary since you must be very careful not to twist or bend the wire. Don't do this side if you are not comfortable with it. Anyway, we need to remove it carefully and not pull, twist or bend the control wire . The wire sits in a cutout in the shell and can be slowly extended; here is a view underneath the wheel: once you see it, you can slowly turn the wheel to its side and pull the wire out of the cutout (marked in red). and that is it. I must say I was tempted to open inner compartments and look at the battery and mainboard but in the end decided not to do it -- I enjoy my wheel too much at the moment and didn't want to break anything. This must wait for another time Putting it back is doing everything in reverse and being careful not to catch any wires. Also, when re-attaching the 7 screws on each vertical bar do this slowly and evenly such that they all go in lightly and are well-aligned. Only then tighten them up. Finally, don't forget to re-attach the charging wire when attaching the black padding again -- and make 100% sure red goes to red, and black to black!!!! Also, don't overtighten the two screws in the handle -- if you strip the screws you are without a handle... I did all of this to get the bike computer neatly tucked away; I'll show that in the next post
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