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EUC

Found 27 results

  1. With winter coming on I am curious if anyone has ever tested how much power/range is lost when the temperature is below freezing. Does anyone know of a range test that was done in warm weather and then again in cold? Is it a minor difference (like 5%) or a major difference (like 25%)?
  2. Hi all. I’d like to ask for some advice. I bought my first wheel (V8F) in July, and I LOVE it. However therein lies my problem: I found my desire to ride is often outlasting its range (24-30km). I’m now looking at the KS-16S. Generally I use it for recreation, mostly on paved trails and bike lanes. I’m a conservative rider; max speed and acceleration are not as important to me (I cruise at a relaxing 20-ish km/h). What is your opinion? Thanks in advance!
  3. KingSong 18XL Range Test. Get a chance to see some of the countryside in Denmark: https://youtu.be/FFsSbt0VM50
  4. Two Veteran Sherman riders document 200 mile (322.4 km) electric unicycle (EUC) ride from Beijing to Ulanqab. Unfortunately, the Tik Tok video does not show the start time of the trip, which begins June 13, 2020, but what is revealed is a potential new top range and a peek into the Sherman’s battery usage. (Read more)
  5. Hey y'all! I've spent a year riding EUCs and ripping through upgrades (IPS i6, InMotion V8, KS18L w/Pedal Upgrade, MSX100V 1.23kWh, and now a MSX100V 1.85kWh coming in the mail). I started off thinking "bleh, I'm not a speed demon like those crazies riding GotWays" so I started off small, but I found that I really love the speed and safety of having more power and keeping up with cars at 70km/h. The big tires also lessen my fear of potholes and other road surface aberrations. Alongside my other hobbies (skydiving and alpine climbing), EUC riding is up there on my favorites list. The EUC is also a convenient tool for short errands, last-mile transport, and walking the dog. I truly believe it's the future of urban transport. So having dropped another $2k on this hobby, I'm idly pondering the future directions that EUCs will take and how they can get better. Could we get together a wish list of near-term and long-term improvements that we'd like to see on the EUCs of the future? Here's my list. Short-term: Kuji Pads standard. Besides enabling tricks like jumping up curbs, Kuji Pads are a safety feature, helping reduce foot slip when traveling over irregular terrain. Long footpedals standard. To extract the most performance (and safety) out of your EUC, the pedals need to be as long as your foot. This allows your center of gravity to shift as far forward or backward as possible, allowing the greatest control input for rapid acceleration and deceleration. It also allows you to climb and descend steeper hills. With the upgraded pedals on the KS18L, I've climbed the steepest hills in San Francisco with no complaint. The same cannot be said for the standard short pedals on the MSX. Footpedal grind guards. Pedal scrape is no joke, especially if your pedal hits a bump in the road. Danger arises from the potential for the pedal to get "stuck," causing a sudden torque and launching you off the EUC. If the pedals had low-friction grind guards on their leading edge (made of acetal or UHMWPE, for example), this would lessen the odds of getting stuck. Of course, they would be consumables. Dihedral footpedals standard. The angled dihedral footpedals of the MSX seem weird at first, but they really secure your foot against the EUC—a huge benefit for reducing foot slip when hitting unexpected bumps, or when riding one-footed. Especially if you must make frequent stops, such as when walking the dog, this latter point is important for lessening foot fatigue. They also lessen the odds of pedal scrape on sharp turns. Long-term: Higher speed. Keeping up with cars is lots of fun, but also important for safety (drivers DGAF). I'd like to see future EUCs with a top speed of 80 or 90km/h. Bigger battery. Since drag force rises quadratically with speed, you need a bigger battery to go long distances if you're going fast. I'd like future EUCs with 3kWh or more. Shock absorbers. My knees are fine, but using them to dampen the resonant tank formed by the tire's spring force and the EUC's mass can be a challenge—as a human, my response time isn't fast enough to dampen it well; I need to anticipate and prepare for the shock. Especially on poorly maintained roads, it's difficult to keep up with the repetitive and unpredictable force impulses when traveling at speed, causing anxiety about foot slip when traveling on unknown paths at night. It would be preferred if shock absorbers (important: with dampeners) were integrated into the EUC structure, especially if the battery was kept unsprung. I imagine this would result in a supremely buttery ride. Belt-drive. This one's debatable, because it introduces another point of failure into the drivetrain, but... The power you can get out of a motor is proportional to the product of its size (namely, its volume) and how fast you spin it. With direct drive, where the motor is integrated into the wheel structure, you aren't spinning the motor very fast so its power density is remarkably low. As a result, for a given power level the motor must be really big—and neodymium and copper ain't cheap. If you added gearing or a belt drive, then the motor could spin faster than the wheel and be much smaller—like a hobby motor. This would substantially reduce the cost and weight of EUCs. Additionally, the sprung mass could be reduced and it would be easier to carry around. I take pause because it adds another point of failure if the belt breaks. While a drivetrain failure on a motorcycle might cause a fall, a drivetrain failure on an EUC will cause a fall. Maybe some belt-drive experts can chime in. Foot attachment. Having dihedral pedals and Kuji pads helps to reduce foot slip, but nothing can beat a true attachment. It needn't take much force, since it would only need to prevent your feet from slipping off while catching air, so "clip-in" pedals like bicycles or skis would be unnecessary. Preferably something that can be detached easily when you need to step or jump off. My thought at the moment is to place a magnet on the pedal or the side of the EUC, and to have a small steel plate that pins to the bottom or side your shoe that is attracted by the magnet. Articulating seats. Control of acceleration on the EUC arises from your ability to translate your center of gravity longitudinally, fore or aft of the tire's point of contact. Your ankles' articulation permits this motion. Fine control of steering is done by twisting your hips (and by extension the EUC) axially against your torso's rotational inertia, and course control by lateral translation of your center of gravity to the left or right of the tire's point of contact. The former is permitted by twisting articulation in your trunk, and the latter by articulation in your ankles and hips. On a seat that is rigidly mounted to the EUC, your ability to perform these translations and rotations is greatly diminished. In this case, you are reliant on the compliance in your butt tissue, which even for those blessed with child-bearing hips is not much. As a result, your control inputs on a seat are severely limited. This endangers you since you cannot steer or decelerate as quickly as may be needed in the event of an emergency. Articulating seats that permit a few centimeters of longitudinal and lateral translation, and several degrees of axial rotation, should greatly improve this situation. Maintenance schedules. As EUCs become faster and more powerful, and as more people ride them, it becomes more critical to keep them well-maintained. Manufacturer-recommended maintenance and inspection intervals may be wise. What's your wishlist? Cheers!
  6. Hello everybody. I want to clear my brain of some worries and listen to input about this from other riders who may have more knowledge on this than me. On a group ride in late Feb, I rode about 45km and returned home with 35% battery remaining. Pretty good for a day spent going up long hills as well as down them, in temps between 4-7C Just recently after that, I decided to get some Silicone and made a custom gasket for my sidepanels. Just as an insurance against any future water ingress. There's obviously been some water in my color LED's because on the left side they spaz out, even when not set to be turned on as I ride. But I don't really care about them, and I don't even know how to get into them in the first place. Okay, so with that metric as my background, my following issue is this. I took my wheel out for a ride of about 20km the other day, and felt like the battery had drained substantially more than I was expecting. I will link a few EUCWorld tours at the end of this for anyone to look at. I didn't think too much more about it, and went about my day. Then I had another ride, and again, I was wondering why the battery level dropped so far down after such a short drive. These rides have all been in temps around 3-8C on a tire that measures around 1.6-7 bars pressure. Secondly, and this might be completely unrelated: Looking at EUCWorld, the battery indicator in the app does not update nearly as smoothly as it did before. It used to be that it would respond completely linearly with the load you put on the wheel, so that you could know if pushing it a certain amount with how much battery was remaining, to 0% (In the app, anyway) However, this is no longer the case. Now it updates very, very rarely. If that is related to my wheel or not, I don't know, but I thought it was worth noting, in case anyone else has seen this too. 20km ride from earlier today. 13Km ride from earlier today
  7. Hey all, nabbed a Z10 back in October and have been happily shortcutting urban transportation since. I recently checked the app and realized I've put 1000 miles on the wheel! I thought I'd ask if there is anything I should think about tuning up or checking out after this much mileage. The wheel is working great, and I'd love to make sure it stays that way. Any tips or advice?
  8. KS18L Range Test of my brand new Kingsong KS18L taking it to work and back. Did I make the trip? This is a real-life range test, with a 200 lbs rider, windy conditions in 20C.
  9. I am planning a 100 mile Dawn-to-Dusk ride this summer with a KS18L (not XL sob..sob). I will spend 6 hours charging. That means I must execute the right ratio of speed to time, or I won't make it. It will be very hard, early in the ride, with adrenaline flowing, to ride at an even, conservative pace. We shall see. I am sure there are others interested in doing extreme long distance rides. To be called a Extreme Long Distance ride (ELDR) for purposes of this thread, the ride has to be a minimum of 80 km continuous. You can stop to charge, eat, relax, but you must complete the ride as part of one riding session. If one is doing a multiple day ride, one can slip below 80 km on a given day, but the average for the whole ride must equal 80 km/day. The challenges for my ride is my riding weight of 109 kg, and that there are NO places to get partial/quick charges except at designated locations at the end of each leg and those will be full charges from 10% or so to 100%., taking a minimum of 3 hours with 5 amp charger. I am considering using a 5 amp charger and the regular 1.5 amp charger for a total of 6.5 amp charging. I think that would still be safe .. ? Anyone can ride fast .. who can ride long?
  10. I did a bit of prodding in the official Discord channel before deciding to post my issue here and such... Yesterday, I decided to see how far I could push my new V10F on a single charge. Unfortunately, I was quite disappointed when my answer ended up being ~24 miles. I'm at a bit of a loss for the solution, as the only thing I could come up with was that the li-ion pack may have gotten swapped out accidentally, when they were fiddling with the waterproofing issue. The ride was smooth, level, and paved for at least 90% of the trip... with the only exceptions being road crossings and a couple of bridges. I only weigh 160lb, so weight shouldn't be an issue. I keep tire pressure at roughly 36PSi, as well. Most, if not all acceleration and deceleration cycles were smooth and gradual, too. To me, 24 miles seems abnormally short, considering InMotion claims at least 50 under ideal conditions. Even derating that value by 10-20% is acceptable. Something seems quite off, when one is only able to achieve 40-50% of the stated range. Thoughts?
  11. I just keep getting impressed with the range of the Kingsong vehicles. Today I went for a 73.5 km ride. Thats over 45.6 miles. Still had 12% power and was only admonished twice about being too low on power and in need of a recharge. Speed was limited for the last 4-5 miles. From 28mph (my limit so far) to 24mph and 20 mph and finally 17 mph at the end. I weigh 150 lbs and the terrain was climing a Mountain, descending, racing along the river, traversing Elysian Park and Dodgers Stadium. Found it to be a much nicer warning system than the original 18S, which took me 62 miles on a 1680wh battery. So what is your record so far on a Kingsong? Good or Bad results are all welcome. Lets try to stay away from equivocators like someone is too scrawney or someone is too large carriaged. Just the recorded distance and the set up of the ride and the riders. 73.5 kms / 45.6 miles on a KS18L 1036wh battery. whats yours?
  12. Does anyone know the range the Inmotion V3 Pro gets? thanks
  13. Following up on @Marty Backe and his disappointment in the KS-18s range I decided to do another 100-0% test on my KS-16s which I haven't done for a pretty long time, just in case I remembered wrong. I know I have been somewhat disappointed in the range of my 16s for quite some time. I start to get noticeable performance throttling as high as 40-50% battery. If you are using a charge doctor to start at 80% this doesn't give you very much "fun" range to play with. Below 35% the performance drops to just barely faster than a ninebot, around 15 mph. Below 15% you are limited to 12 mph. So from 100-0% today I got 23.5 miles, approximately 2.5 hrs of riding. To be fair this is on the hills of San Francisco both up and down some fairly steep inclines over the course of the test. I generally only feel good about riding my KS-16s for about 10-15 miles most days. Once it starts to throttle your top speed it also starts to struggle to climb hills and does not take well to hitting bumps at speed. Since I live in an urban area full of steep hills I always feel these effects if I ride more than 5 miles one way since my home is on top of a giant hill. So if I had double the battery (840 in my 16s to the 1680 of the 18s) I would have made 47 miles. This is almost exactly what Marty got I believe so I feel like those who have speculated one of the three battery packs may be disconnected are likely wrong. It really probably only goes ~45 miles if it is roughly double the endurance of my 16s. Since I use my 16s primarily to commute 7 miles per day roughly the range does not stop it from fulfilling that primary function. However, it really is not enough to go on longer group rides or extended hill climbing as the battery starts to limit your performance to the point where you could not keep up with the group within a fairly short amount of time. That being said the wheel has been great for traveling around the city and I still have fun riding it - but it just turns out the practical usable range for me is so far below what is commonly described on this forum that I feel like people should be informed. If I'd known the range was that limited I might have chosen a different wheel instead. What do you guys think? Are the riding conditions here (cold and hilly) making this more of an issue for me than for the average 16s owner? Or have others noticed this as well?
  14. Hello guys, I've spent quite a bit of time perusing the forum (and others), but I haven't found much information about the new miniPRO 260 model, which I own two of. I bought my first miniPRO 260 from Amazon during the last sale. I was hesitant because of the smaller battery, but I figured that 1.5mi deficit was not a huge dealbreaker. When the unit arrived, however, I was surprised to see the app estimating an 11mi range with 100% battery. I know that range is dependent on riding style, temperature, weight, etc, but I at least expected the app to estimate the full 12.5mi range when fully charged. Furthermore, I have only ever achieved about 7 miles of actual range on the miniPRO, with normal riding over flat terrain, and tires at 45psi (I weight 175lbs). Based on my research, I figured that this was way too low, so I exchanged the unit. The new miniPRO 260 now advertises 14mi on a full charge, but that instantly drops to 11mi the second any weight is placed on the foot sensors! Does this happen to anybody else? The drop is universal at 3mi, meaning it will, for instance, go from 9 to 6 mi when at that level. I guess I'm curious what other miniPRO 260 owners report their app saying, and if the range is actually that much different than mine. I just got the replacement unit this evening, and I haven't had a chance to ride it to empty yet, but so far it seems about in-line with my previous miniPRO.
  15. I’ve been given the opportunity to get a good deal on a practically new 18s . It’s the 840wh version though. I’ve heard that the 1680wh version doesn’t really have all that great of a range so wondering what people have gotten out of the 840. My main consideration here is price . Is 25-35mi feasible ?
  16. I have a KS14D so 420wh battery . The range on it is decent for the type of riding I have been doing lately but I do seem to be charging it almost every night. My main question here is whether or not that is bad for it ? Today for instance I checked my battery level and it’s at 84%. Given that I run into the power restrictions and warning beeps somewhere around 40% I decided to top it off before I head out . Will doing this decrease the life of my battery ? I’ve heard 20-80% is the “sweet spot “ but due to the low wh rating I really need to be at 95-100% if I’m planning on going out for long rides .
  17. How far can you travel at top speed or close to it on your device in freezing weather and warm weather? provide: battery size, Wh average speed Range at top speed in below freezing/Range at top speed above 10 degrees Celsius Given comfortable tyre pressure.
  18. Please post your Gotway average range on a charge, and your battery size. For me I have a 680wh (MCM4), but haven't been able to get it low yet (my lowest was 60% after a few hours of riding). That thing just keeps going! I'll update when I manage to actually get it low.
  19. I wondered: is there a simple calculation that can predict my range from the next properties: My weight (wheel included), battery size, and the hilliness of the route I am about to go. Roughly said, your hilly range is your normal flat range minus 75 meter for every meter up and down. Since most of you know your flat range, this will do. But I also came up with a formula for your flat range (from real world experience myself and other people on this forum): 10 km per 150 Wh (weight 75 kg) 10 km per 175 Wh (weight 125 kg) In a formula, with B = battery size in Wh and W = weight in kg, flat range is: 10.000 * (B / (150 + (W-75)/2) ) Example: you weight 87.5 kg and your Ninebot One E+ has 340Wh battery. So W=100 B=340. You go on a 15 km ride with 400 m up and down worth of hills. Will you make it all the way? flat range= 10000 * (340 / (150 + 12.5) ) = 10000 * 2.092 = 20920 m hilly range in this case is 3 km shorter (75 * 400), so you will make it.
  20. I’m going give a head to head comparison between the IPS Lhotz 340 and the T680+(a.k.a. “Tank” or 151/152, or T500 which is mentioned on the box; the fine art of marketing cleary has not trickled down to IPS yet ). I’ll split the review up in several parts, as this will make it easier to comment and/or ask questions. After combing through most threads on brands, BMS, motor, battery, FP or not to FP, etc., I count myself lucky to have bought a Lhotz340Wh (older version with torque biased motor, limited to 20KmH) august last year. So why did I buy the IPS 680+? Lhotz Design: The broader (2,5inch) and larger tyre which actually makes the wheel around >1inch bigger than the one of th IPS680+ results in good traction and stability. It has relatively long pedals (22cm, you can scrape the corner of the pedals on the ground in tight turns) so you can place your feet exactly where you want them depending on what you want to do, which improves control over the wheel. The pedals are made of solid painted aluminum, they are not that thick and I tend to feel some flex (real flex or the hinges, fixtures?). Because of the paint the pedals are quite slippery when wet, this is nothing a patch of skate board tape cannot cure. The body (15cm wide) tapers off towards the edges and there’s no protruding battery housing at the top, so there’s room for the inner side of your calfs (no pressure) and you can put your feet close to the center which is great for stability and control. As a consequence the biggest pressure is on the inside of the ankles instead of the calfs. There’s here and there in strategic places soft rubber-like bright red padding (the brownread stuff on the pictures is my doing), with a high friction surface which is great for improving control over the wheel. The case has broad cut-outs front and back, so negotiation small obstacles like branches on the road poses no problem at all. The Lhotz is very sturdy by design, no rattles or creaks if you pressure it, and the handle is stainless steel so it doesn’t break even if you wheel bounces downhill without you. This all comes at a weight penalty of course: 14 kg. The round stainless tube of which the handle is made doesn’t improve the weight perception when carrying it, it’s slippery and cold in winter (I’m now using a samsonite belt to carry it). I don’t understand why IPS put a plastic slide-on charging port cover on it, which doesn’t stick for more than a minute. To save weight perhaps, really??? (I replaced it by an aftermarket metal screw cap)The battery charger is a very light box with an active cooling system (which doesn’t inspire a lot of trust, what happens if the ventilator dies?), and a US style wall plug (an EU adapter was sold separately) Verdict: Excellent Lhotz Safety: The Lhotz has enough torque to cope with my 100Kg adequately but it’s not perfect, I’ve had 2 FP, 1 overtorqueing when acceleration too fast from standstill, and 1 on a slight downward slope riding in a pit when at it’s cruising speed. When I push the weel, I can feel it (the motor?) struggling and (I believe) the BMS sometimes cuts in fractions of a second when the battery is drained too fast. I’ve experienced no BMS cut-outs though; when the batt level decreases the pedals start tilting at lower speeds and the weel starts beeping if you try to push it, even at very low speeds the tiltback is quite strong so there seems to be plenty of reserve programmed into the BMS. Therefor I would consider the Lhotz by design a relatively safe wheel, the flipside is that below 50% batt level the wheel is no fun to ride at all, and it’s game over below 30%. Verdict: Very good Lhotz Range/speed: Even with the torque biased motor, limited to 20KmH, it doesn’t feel that stable at the 17KmH cruising speed (see safety topic above). At 17KmH cruising speed, it drains 50% of the battery in about 12km. I live in a small village, and for shopping, the library, public administration, etc. I have to commute to the main village of the region which is at 5km one way. 12Km max range is not enough, driving around a bit for the shopping, windy conditions, low temp, and I barely can get home. There’s no fun in carrying a 14kg wheel, believe me, this causes me quite a bit of range anxiety. My wife already had to come and ‘save’ me by car, because I forgot the evening before that I rode just a very short distance and didn’t charge it to a full 100% (I try to avoid this because it’s not good for the battery). So if a guy of my size needs a cruising range of >15Km at a cruising speed of 20-25KmH, 340Wh is nearly not enough. Adequate. Which brings me to my choice of the T680+: Looking around, I saw no 16” alternatives from a reputed brand with such a big battery and a proven design (the KS16 is brand new). With the T680+ I hope to find (almost) the same build quality, high torque motor, and decent safety features, all this for a price of 1,129.- USD (delivery and taxes included) delivered to my door in Belgium straight from the IamIPS factory in just 12 days.
  21. I realize there is only a hundred versions and user weights but what are your real life experiences on the distances with the battery/model you are getting??? I believe the companies are overstating what units can do for real! I (72 kg) bought a AirWheel Q3 (800 w motor) w/340 wh battery... They claim it should get 25-40 km (that's 15-25 miles for you sad Americans) but..... I only get 10 mi (sorry, not 8 km, stupid two measurement system country!), on flat land.... Big Disappointment. State your mass, model, battery, claim distance, Real Distance. Needless to say, it should be based on mainly flat terrain for better comparison. Holy Crap update--- I talked to sellers, they say the only way, beside tear apart, is by weight, to know what battery I have. Q3 comes in 4 different batteries, mine should weigh (340wh) 31.5 lb, (170wh) 30 lb, mine actually weighed in at 26.5 Pounds!!!! BS update--- now seller claims my unit was 'early' unit made up of 'lighter' material, but will refund the extra $200 if kept... The bs just gets higher and higher.... And they said the upper limit of 40 miles is only theoretical. Really??? Why state something that will never happen? And I should go 5 mph.... How? There is no gauge to see how fast I am doing....and why buy an e-unicycle if I can walk that fast... Wonder if the 'lighter material' was a freakn battery!!! Update I took the money and rode off! And still have a sad little eu... Lesson learned... Not airwheelunicycle.com sellers fault, totally, I blame scrupulous Chinese business practices, sadly seller is repeating blasphemous rhetoric...
  22. Real world stats as tested by 140 lbs rider at 100 ft elevation, 55F degree weather with 12+ mph winds, and 45psi tire: Battery Range: 13 miles (21 km) in uneven road/sidewalk surfaces with constant incline changes. Non-stop riding.Max Speed: 12 mph (on leveled 180 degrees surface)Max climbing incline: ~60 degrees (tested in off-road hill)Unexpected power cutoffs: NONEMax charge time: 2 hrs(now post yours)
  23. I recently did a range test of my genetic euc that i purchased from Amazon a month ago. I am very satisfied in all areas (durability, speed, maneuverability, price) but the range is terrible (3.7 miles on last run on flat road °55 temperature). I would like to increase the range. I will consider purchasing a much better unit once this failes. I bought a cheap one to learn on and determine if i would be interested in them. Although instead of shelling out $500-$1000 that I don't have I'm interested in investing $75-$150 in a new battery to get the most out of this one. Thoughts or help on an external battery? I opened the shell but there is no extra room inside.
  24. Is there a reason why it seems just Gotway and King Song sell electric unicycles with big battery packs in them? (granting the euc a long travel distance range) Why are the other manufacturers (Solowheel, Ninebot, IPS, Airwheel, etc.) not installing batteries bigger than the 300's Wh? For me range is top priority, top speed is secondary. I'm sure I'm not the only one. The other manufacturers need to step it up!
  25. To those of you with, specifically, the 680Wh battery King Song unicycles... what distance/range does it last you until the low battery warning starts? I wanna read real world stats by genuine owners. Thanks!
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