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EUC

Found 8 results

  1. Hi all, I wanted to share with you the mods I've done to the two electric unicycles I've had for the moment by adding padding to avoid the leg pain we all experienced at the beginning, mainly when learning. Some may have got used to it, however I never did as after a while not being able to keep learning due to the pain, I found the solution, adding good padding (not the one that comes by default, not enough). So on my first electric unicycle, a generic one, I added 2x "bike seat gel protection" (3 Eur each, cutting the part that attaches to the seat), using mounting tape (double sided tape would have been cleaner), here the result: I think it may be the most comfortable I've tried. However, the pedals could not close completely and one got soft after some time and would not stay up. My next padding mod was when I got my IPS Lhotz, again it was painful as it only has a bit of padding on the top of the side and it is not very soft. This time I used the EPE Foam that came on the shipping box of the unicycle, some red plastic from a bag/folder for documents and double sided tape. The result, also comfortable, but not as much as the gel seats. From the video I've on YouTube: Here the state of it after a year, dirty and falling apart: Both the mounting tape and the double sided tape I used were hard to remove, so you better try it a bit before carefully putting it together Now I was looking for a new padding, I found two new options: work knee pads and knee-elbow soft guards/pads. The work knee pads are not flat, so could not really use them and also were not comfortable enough. I decided it was time to try the knee-elbow soft guards/pads as the were comfortable. The result is pretty good and they are comfortable! Let's see once I use them to go to work or for a long MeetUp ride how do they feel. Let us see your padding mods!
  2. A few weeks ago, I was fortunate to discover the world of electric unicycles. I stumbled upon it as I was researching different e-scooters options that could relevant as a practical commuting device in Manhattan. My research led me to the following conclusion: no e-scooter, or e-skate comes close to the performance, range, compact size as an EUC. The problem was, I didn't know anyone who's even tried an electric unicycle and maybe saw once a rider quickly zipping through Broadway street, standing magically tall on a fast spinning wheel. Fortunately, I stumbled upon this forum and after combing through the invaluable info, I finally purchased my first wheel from the outstanding Jason at eWheels who had it at my house the next day: A King Song K14S. As I've learned a lot from this forum, I wanted to share some tips in the hope that something will find them useful. Getting on the wheel - Learning to be stable on a wheel doesn't take more than a few days but in my short experience, requires two important things: excellent video tutorials (my favorite are from the French "tuto de la semaines" - Hirsute) and a friend with a wheel who can take your hand for an hour. The latter I still couldn't find but I was fortunate to find myself in Paris for a few days and subscribed to a lesson (electric wheels are much more popular in France than in the US). Padding the wheel - The first few days, I would, of course, fall a lot. I've read some tips about padding but actually found what I think worked best for me: - Foam strips with adhesive, high density isolation: Available in different sizes and thickness - Hyper-reflective RIM tape by CustomTaylor33: I've rarely on Amazon seen such a highly rated product from a small business. I actually reached out to Taylor who sent me the custom pieces the next day. As you can see, these are indeed very reflective. - I also added a vinyl film but I'm actually not sure it's necessary. Padding ourselves - One item that I would recommend for winter riders is a pair of gloves with integrated (and removable) wrist guards. I've only found a product from DaKine Upgrading the wheel - As many of you already found out, the XL Pedals that Jason masterfully commissioned are a game changer for using the wheel. It used to feel like standing on a stool with the smaller pedals. Now it reminds me of seating the large leather seat of an SUV. Thank you for all your help and support. Raphael
  3. My InMotion V8 just got delivered yesterday, and I've been able to get two practice sessions in so far! I'm slowly getting the hang of it and am trying to catch the wheel when I lose my balance, but I've managed to scratch up the bottom of the pedals and pedal hinge. What are you guys using to pad your wheels, and where are you placing them? Photos would be great!
  4. Hey, all. Just wondering if anyone has any pictures of their mSupers's padding? I have the baby carriage padding and both tape and velcro strips, I'm just looking for advice and ideas. Thanks!
  5. Hello everyone! So, just got a shipping update, I am to expect my Ninebot E+ next monday! Must say I am super excited....I got to thinking after reading and watching some EUC training videos, a majority of the time in the beginning stages the EUC takes quite a beating! I saw one video where the battery ejected out of the EUC! after a small tumble in the parking lot. I was wondering what people here do to "protect" their investment while they are learning, and by protect meaning try to prevent it from getting beat up in the first few weeks of training. I do understand a tumble here, a dent there and scuffs and scratches but I would like to minimize that during my first few weeks until I get somewhat of a hold on what im doing! lol I was thinking maybe duct tape? draping an old sweater/jacket over the thing? cutting out an insulated shopping bag and taping it over the wheel....any thoughts??
  6. Just thought I'd share the link with everyone. I'm not the seller, but I have one, and it's pretty comfortable: http://lindydesignlab.com/product/padded-sleeve-blue-king-song-14/ Basically these serve two functions: protecting the unicycle from scratches, and protecting your inner legs from getting damaged during your rides. ps. Not sure if this is the right place to post it, but thought I'd share it since I have not seen this type of product anywhere else yet.
  7. There's been lots of discussion on injuries and wearing protection, especially as of late. Maybe it's BMS failure, maybe the wheel caught a rock, but it seems that faceplants are inevitable. Please add to the vote! Perhaps this could people decide on a riding speed they're comfortable with, and how much protection to wear. There's no right or wrong answer -- except the honest truth! (Your answers are anonymous.) Thanks for your help! Speaking of bailing off EUCs at high speed, on this thread, @csmyers caught his highly-skilled high speed bailout roll on video, @Gimlet suggests riding with your knees bent to run off at high speeds, @Jurgen and @lizardmech give nice pointers on martial arts rolls to bail at high speeds. It's an interesting read even if you're not skilled enough to attempt rolls at high speeds, I'd recommend it.
  8. I strongly agree with wearing protective clothing. Maybe falling off is unavoidable at times however reducing the chances of injury are easy. I have put together a range of protective clothing in cooperation with some Australian partners that I will ship from Australia. Australia has been a leader in crash protection for a long time, haha we needed it. For road/concrete surfaces you will completely kit yourself out for about USD 600.00 (dirt protective clothing is a little cheaper) (Helmet, gloves, boots, Kevlar pants, Kevlar jacket (even have a hoody that looks normal even though it has hidden padding and elbow, back protectors) There are heaps of styles and choices. Sizing is world standards or I have a size chart if required. your current footwear will have the size written on it. You can go all out with full leather and high quality full face helmet and pay around USD1500.00 Here is an example of what you can purchase
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