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EUC

Found 19 results

  1. Hi, my name is Mauricio, i am from Bogota, Colombia, in my country there are not much EUCs, so I have had the luck to met someone here who taught me some basics. at this time, i am able to ride, make turns, (not to tight), mount without help, brake, etc, however, I have a slight fear, if i will have to stop, mount, and go forward in the middle of a hill, (up or down) is there any consideration to take, any variation of my body inclination, for mount and start to go forward? Sorry i have had to use a little help of deepl, for write here Thanks in Advance
  2. So I’ve been riding about 2 months now . I’ve learned how to ride with one leg , so one leg spins , ride slow , carve back and forth ect...but riding backwards is still seemingly impossible for me . As soon as I get going I can’t help but turn sharply to one side or the other . Just wondering how others learned and if there were any tips or tricks . Thanks !
  3. I'm not sure when I first saw an EUC, but it was on youtube and I just kept watching more and more videos. Then I found this site and finally after a few weeks of watching and earning some side cash to appease the Mrs I bought my starter wheel!! It'll be arriving tomorrow, and I am so pumped to start learning! I must have watched a dozen beginner videos and read others' experiences on the forums. today I got my helmet and guards, so I hopefully won't hurt myself. https://imgur.com/gallery/4qT9oGB
  4. Hello all, My name is Pat, I just ordered my first EUC. I am hoping there is an enthusiast near by that might be willing to help me get started, and meet some people to get out with after I am competent 🙃. I would greatly appreciate the time and advice, as it's easier to learn it correctly now than fix bad habits later. Thank you to all and I hope to meet some great people around the forum. Happy wheeling Pat
  5. Hi Guys. I started riding EUC purely because we started selling them in the UK. I purely use mine for fun and tricks rarely do i use it as a tool to commute. Ive clocked up about 1000km mainly in my town and have got to point of wanting to practice more advanced skills, at present i am learning to ride backwards which is coming along nicely. The reason for this post is i noticed when wanting to learn to ride backwards most videos just show people performing the tricks very rarely did i find good content showing you how to learn the tricks. So today I ask you all if you have links to good tutorials on how to perform advanced riding tricks As always thank you very much in advance to all who contribute to this topic it will benefit me and many others and revive this thread on the forumn. Thanks Andrew
  6. Hi all. Today i got my Gotway Teala V2 I am new to riding electric unicycle so today i just watched u-stride beginner videos. I am a electric scooter retailer but always been intrigued learning how to ride an EUC lockdown has just given me the time to focus on learning. My plan of attack is to practice drills for 1 hour a day for a week and then attempt going for a ride is this fron your experience a practical approach? I created this post to say shout out to all the fellow euc riders liking what i see of the community so far. I am from Sittingbourne Kent and wanted to know if theres any other riders from Kent near me. Once I can actually ride it would be great to ride with locals. Hope all are well today. Hecticc
  7. Almost a year ago I was bitten by the EUC bug and my life changed... for better! Not only I returned to my twenties, but my interests gradually increased towards embedded systems, DIY and hardware. Afterwards I found myself comfortable in this excellent community full of positiveness seemingly also induced by the EUC bug I'm going to disclose that I've been living around hardware without much care more than 20 years as a professional computer scientist/engineer. Also I want to admit I've changed (sub-)industries a lot because I've never been truly happy with my job, I've always had the feeling that something was missing. Now I believe that this has always been the hardware-itch which I never dared to scratch because of how complex it looked like, but it never went away. After reading many times here that EUCs are "simple machines" I finally plucked up the courage to humbly ask all the pros/gurus/hackers/DIYers of this forum for recommendations that teach basic electronics for dummies ultimately to understand, in the long term, how EUCs work. Note that I'm not asking for all-in-one dense books that require having a masters to read more than 10 pages Bonus points if you go the Open Source/Hardware route Thank you!
  8. For me there has been a long development process in my progression of learning to ride an ECU. I’m presently about to pass the 300km mark on my first wheel (9BotE+), and I find myself still acquiring new skills with every ride. My personal experience of learning has been very different from that of many of the boasts I’ve read in forums (1 hour and I was bored of my slow wheel). Granted, I did take those with a grain of salt, armored up and put in the time to learn the wheels. Developing the skills necessary to ride an EUC has been truly rewarding, and now I can’t imagine life without one; I would be a bird without wings. For those learning, I thought I’d put together a list of keystones in my progress. For the old hands among us I curious how your progression differed. First 2.5 hours – Clinging to handrails/walls, holy smokes, is this even possible! Next 1.5 hours – A small window of hope – I started to ride 5 to 10m without a handrail. By 3km – I was able to ride around a soccer pitch, reacting but with little control. By 6m – I was riding a dirt running track, staying in lanes. By 10km – I was able to complete wide purposefully turns (right was easier than left) By 15km – I was riding the quieter streets of the neighborhood. By 20km – I was started doing longer rides – 10km+ on trails/bike paths. By 40km – I started riding busier 40kph streets. Steeper slopes, rough terrain less intimidating. By 90km – Started commuting to work, negotiating cross walks, bike lanes and heavier traffic. By 120km – Traffic awareness greatly increased. Queuing in on sound, looking back and over shoulder. Foot fatigue becomes less of an issue. By 200km – More confident in traffic. Tight turns, stops and takeoffs are becoming second nature. By 300km – Riding has become mostly effortless. It’s now easy to zone out and become too comfortable, perhaps this is the most dangerous phase of the learning curve. Still working on: Good foot placement each time on takeoff, reverse still difficult, balancing on one leg, still not a confident nighttime road rider, takeoff in difficult surface conditions, balancing at a full stop (for stop signs). I felt I had initially outgrown my 9BotE+ at around 80km, though now I’m glad I didn’t upgrade. 220km latter and I’m still learning a lot on my original wheel, largely control and awareness. After many spills and being dropkicked by a dog @ 15 kph the poor little wheel has taken a beating but still runs great! I’ve worn ankle, wrist, knee, elbow guards and full-face helmet from the beginning and have come out relatively unscathed. So much of riding an EUC is building strength and muscle memory. It’s a true satori experience, with dramatic realizations of growth. I find these moments exhilarating. What’s your experience?
  9. I've been really digging down into the details and trying to make a nice dense video with everything you need to know how to get rolling for the first time. Its a complete beginners tutorial covering the gear, tips, the basics, where and how to practice riding so you can stay on. Successfully taught someone how to ride in just 1.5 hours!
  10. Yeesh... First off, i hope this is in the right area. I apologize if not! So i just got my KS-16s the other day. I tried it for the first time yesterday and was able to ride a good 20 metres without falling. I was pretty proud of myself, even though the tire pressure was super low. I posted a video of me riding on social media, and my younger brother, who is like a wizz, saw it and was like "I'm coming over!". I'm like, "oh no...." Fast forward... we're in the school playground..area thing..its all slanted and sloped and terrible and he hops on. I can already tell hes found his center of balance within 30 seconds. "Oh no.....". I try to quicken my pace to keep up with him... I fall off the wheel a few times an it smashes into the inside of my legs....welp, there goes my stamina. (This actually did kill me though because by the end, i couldn't even ride a foot without stepping off when it rubbed against the bruise. My legs are gonna need to get used to this/conditioning. Fast forward again. The wheels tilting a little bit much and i cant climb at all, my brother suggests we put air in the wheel. At this point, he can ride smoothly, by the way. At the 20 minute mark. I'm still weight shifting like crazy and losing my mind. So we head back home and connect the pump. Tell me why the pressure is 7 psi, lol... How? LOL. Anyways, we pump it up to 40 psi and head back out. My brother is now riding at max speed and looping the school getting "Please reduce your speed, you absolute Muppet" messages from the wheel. (I may have added the Muppet part). I cant even stand on the wheel, as the newfound firmness makes me fly all over the place, and my legs are sore so its hard to even get on it. My mind is all over the place, i'm overthinking and feeling intimidated by the wheel. Also this gloom falls over me. "What if i never learn this thing? How is this ever going to feel normal? I just don't get it...". This is where we've left off. I'm tired, bruised both my legs and my ego. I'm honestly feeling pretty defeated, but then, its only day 2. I guess just having someone show up, and outdo you in seconds makes you feel like you're behind the curve, and that small voice in your mind that tells you "This is impossible" becomes a shout. So i'm curious. Did any of you guys feel like this right at the beginning? And if so, how did you get past that feeling? And were you a quick learner or slower? I'd love to hear some other experiences to maybe cheer up LOL Thanks for reading~
  11. A few weeks ago, I was fortunate to discover the world of electric unicycles. I stumbled upon it as I was researching different e-scooters options that could relevant as a practical commuting device in Manhattan. My research led me to the following conclusion: no e-scooter, or e-skate comes close to the performance, range, compact size as an EUC. The problem was, I didn't know anyone who's even tried an electric unicycle and maybe saw once a rider quickly zipping through Broadway street, standing magically tall on a fast spinning wheel. Fortunately, I stumbled upon this forum and after combing through the invaluable info, I finally purchased my first wheel from the outstanding Jason at eWheels who had it at my house the next day: A King Song K14S. As I've learned a lot from this forum, I wanted to share some tips in the hope that something will find them useful. Getting on the wheel - Learning to be stable on a wheel doesn't take more than a few days but in my short experience, requires two important things: excellent video tutorials (my favorite are from the French "tuto de la semaines" - Hirsute) and a friend with a wheel who can take your hand for an hour. The latter I still couldn't find but I was fortunate to find myself in Paris for a few days and subscribed to a lesson (electric wheels are much more popular in France than in the US). Padding the wheel - The first few days, I would, of course, fall a lot. I've read some tips about padding but actually found what I think worked best for me: - Foam strips with adhesive, high density isolation: Available in different sizes and thickness - Hyper-reflective RIM tape by CustomTaylor33: I've rarely on Amazon seen such a highly rated product from a small business. I actually reached out to Taylor who sent me the custom pieces the next day. As you can see, these are indeed very reflective. - I also added a vinyl film but I'm actually not sure it's necessary. Padding ourselves - One item that I would recommend for winter riders is a pair of gloves with integrated (and removable) wrist guards. I've only found a product from DaKine Upgrading the wheel - As many of you already found out, the XL Pedals that Jason masterfully commissioned are a game changer for using the wheel. It used to feel like standing on a stool with the smaller pedals. Now it reminds me of seating the large leather seat of an SUV. Thank you for all your help and support. Raphael
  12. Be gentle... Please forgive the following.. Lack of suitable protection, i have now bought some Flexmeters and a meter roll of bandages. The potato quality video, my phone is boss as at video, but the free online editor i used spits out crap. The constant shots of my ass (you love it though). The peeing dog. I have nothing else to say here. The lack of any talent what-so-ever. I promise the following going forward.. Nothing. (Whoops, this isn't my wedding vows..) I will try again, and again. and then take a break if i still don't get it. Then i will try some more. More really bad jokes and awkward talking to the camera. Cheers yall.
  13. This is a general guide for beginners. It is pier to pier advice from a fellow enthusiast. Not responsible for results. Post is likely to be edited. Can I learn ? If you have normal movement of your legs and feet. If you can walk a miles (1.6km) in gusts of 20 mph ( 32km/h) winds without assistance. If you are strong enough to withstand falling to the ground and don't mind bumps and bruises then yes you can learn to ride an electric unicycle. Riding an electric unicycle combines the skills of walking and riding a bicycle. When you walk forward you lean forward first then move your feet to catch yourself. It is the same motion on an electric unicycle except you can't just step to the side. Like a bicycle you have to steer the wheel to catch yourself side to side. This takes time and patience to learn. Note: We have several forum members that experience pain when walking more than 100 yards ( 91 meters). In stead of employing a wheel chair or sitting on the couch they have found freedom using EUC's . While this might not be recommended, it seems you will not change there mind on the subject any time soon. I myself respect their decision. Learning to ride is a challenge. Determination in most cases is more important than skill. Don't expect to be able to ride efficiently in a few days or even weeks. Should I learn? Risk is involved. It is like learning to ride a bicycle or skate board. Unlike a bicycle you are depending on an electrical device to keep you from falling. Some people see an electric unicycle and have to have one. If you are not one of those people the electric unicycles may not be for you. How long does it take to learn to ride? While some people can learn to ride around in a few hours or days most of those same people would not be able to ride comfortably with bike and pedestrian traffic. In most cases it takes 15 minutes a day for a month to be able to ride peacefully down a bike path. Unlike learning to ride a bicycle most people learn gradually. In the beginning any wrong movement can upset your balance. As you get better you can move more freely. Example: As a beginner I had to use both hands to adjust my glasses while riding because if I used one it would throw off my balance. I could not turn my head to see behind me and any small bump would almost send me to the ground. Three months later and I could turn my body around and video record my wife as she follows behind me while I blindly hit speed bumps. ( NOT recommended , result may very ) The point is you learn slowly over time. One additional reason that it may take time to improve your skills is that you may need to build up your leg and core muscles. Don't worry, all you have to do is continue riding the unicycle. As a beginner It is a one wheeled leg and core workout center. Once you have learned to ride properly it becomes more of a calf builder. Wich Electric Unicycle should I buy? This topic starts wars that rival the US Ford Vs Chevy war. Several factors come into play: Weight and Aggression. The power of the unicycle is important. The unicycle has to be able to over power your moments. If you are heavy or aggressive you can over power the unicycle and fall on your face. Knowing this helps but having the proper unicycle is better. The unicycle uses beeps and tilt back to warn you that you are getting close to the limits. If you gradually become more aggressive you should hit a beep before you hit a limit. When choosing a unicycle you should pay close attention to the weight limits. Keep in mind that the weight given is for maximum weight of a non aggressive rider on flat ground. Quick maneuvers, rapid changes in speed , bumps at high speed and dropping off curbs with an under powered unicycle can over power the unicycle. Wheel size. The bigger wheels give a smoother ride and tend to be more stable at high speeds. The down side is that they are less maneuverable at low speeds and more difficult for beginners and non weekly riders when riding up hills. The geometry requires more force on your toes to lean the wheel enough to go up a hill. Once you build up the calf muscles the hills disappear but if you go months without riding your calf muscles disappear. Smaller wheels tend to give a rougher ride. They are more maneuverable at slow speeds and less stable at high speeds. They are also easy hill climbers. See hill climbing physics here Battery Size. The bigger the battery the further you can go. Keep in mind that the bigger motors can deplete the battery faster and that it makes the unicycle heavier. Also batteries that are too small for a rider are over worked and do not last as long. Motor Size, A larger motor gives you a larger safety margin. Remember the unicycle has to be able to control your moments without being over powered. A larger motor is also faster and more powerful. Now the bad news. Bigger and more powerful means more expensive. Plus the added weight means that when you crash you are more likely to damage the unicycle. This is why some people choose to get a beginner unicycle. A beginner unicycle is a unicycle that you don't mind damaging and takes damage well. Some of the unicycles that are known for speed do not take damage well. After you have learned to ride you can trade up and sell your beginner Unicycle to the next beginner or keep it as a backup. When people come along and say, " That looks fun! Can I try!?" I tell them, "Sure !" and pull out my beginner unicycle. While learning to ride you can party protect your unicycle from low speed damage with padding and automotive door protector. You can wrap your unicycle with padding or an old towel or blanket and lots of packing tape. Just make sure nothing can get in the wheel. After the padding is removed you can continue to protect the edges of the unicycle from getting scratched with a roll of automotive door protector. Note: 2018 We are still in the beginning days of the electric unicycle. Changes and improvement are happening every day. It is best to research the product you are buying. You might want the " I got one first" people to test the wheels before you get one. There has been surprises, good and bad with all brands. Where do I get one? Beware of old stock. The most expensive part of the unicycle is the battery. The batteries only last so long even if not used. When unused batteries sit on a shelf too long they can loose their charge and fail to ever take a charge again. Older model unicycles tend to lack improvements and updates. Even when you think you are getting a new unicycle you might be getting one that is a year old. Getting an older unicycle is not always a bad thing. Just make sure you are not paying new price for an older model. Places like eWheels.com and Speedyfeet.co.uk are there for you during and after the sale. If you have a problem chances are they can and will help. You can buy from other good electric unicycle shops but you need to research their reputation first. I have always enjoyed buying things on E bay but it is not likely the best bet for an electric unicycle at this time. 2018 Buying from a friend or fellow enthusiast is also a good place to get a deal. Your Protection You should always wear protection. The very minimum protection should include wrist guards and helmet. The most likely part of your body to get hurt is your hands and wrist. Your wrist guards do an amazing job of preventing that. The most important part of your body to protect is you head. That is where we keep our brains and we need those. When looking for a helmet it is best to chose one with extra coverage. The common bicycle helmet leaves a lot to be desired. Better helmets include, Skate board helmets, Snow board helmets, White water helmets, and for full face protection, BMX helmets, and paragliding helmets. Other protection strongly recommended, Knee pads, elbow pads, shin guards, dirt bike body armor, motorcycle jacket. Tips Foot position Most people start out with thier feet too far forward. This will wear out your calf muscles quick. Every unicycle and person is differant. Positions may very. A good starting point is to have the back of your shoe even with the back edge of the pedal or the front of your shin on the center line or the unicycle. For more control on bigger unicycles while going up and down hills you can move one foot forward and one back. What to expect when learning to ride My feet hurt after just five minutes. - This is common in the beginning phase of learning. I am exhausted after 15 minutes. - When you are learning you tend to use every muscle in your body to balance. It gets much easier with time. I can't figure this thing out. - You are over thinking. It is easier when you don't think about it. The longer I practice the worse I get. - Shorter more frequent sessions are better. I forgot everything I learned yesterday. - It takes a few minutes to get back to where you last left off. I would do better in a wide open parking lot. - Not true. After learning basic skills big open spaces can be scary and lack purpose. They make you think about what you are doing instead of naturally responding to surroundings. The Wobbles - Wobble is tricky and never really goes away but we learn to control it. A bump or over correction usually starts the wobble and a repeated over correction keeps it going. Proper foot position can reduce the affect. A change in momentum can stop the wobble. When a wobble accrues you can stop it by: Turning, slow down, shift your weight, favoring one foot, take a deep breath, or even stop trying to stop the wobble. The worse thing you can do is freak out. I like to call it the force feedback loop error. I can't turn right. - No one can. It is a heavily concealed secrete among unicycle riders. Just kidding. Most people are right foot dominate. Turning right requires you to trust the left foot more than you are used to. It will come with time. Doing figure eights around fixed object helps get over the problem. I freak out when I get near people. - And you thought you were above psychology. It is easy to lose confidence when you are not really sure how you are doing what you are doing. While you should always be safe and leave proper space between you and others your comfort zone will likely shrink smaller than the people you are around. People keep staring at me - They have never seen anything so cool before. At college, a student on a nice electric scooter stopped and said under his breath as I passed by " I feel pretty lame right now." Mistakes to avoid Tire pressure - When you receive your unicycle the tire pressure is usually too low. Riding with low tire pressure can damage the expensive hard to find tube and reduce the life of your tire. Filling the tube to the proper pressure can be difficult. The valve is often difficult to access. Once the proper pressure is achieved air that is lost while disconnecting the pump makes a huge difference in your final pressure. Pitfalls - Always watch the ground in front of you for pot holes, bumps, roots, uneven pavement, curbs, slippery surfaces and anything else to trip you up. kids, dogs, angry spouse .. Over confidence - After learning the basics people become too confident and push themselves past their abilities resulting in injury. You might think you have learned everything but you will be surprised how much better you get each month. Lifting the unicycle while turned on. - The unicycle will spin the tire to maximum speed in an attempt to level it'self. If this happens continue holding the unicycle up off the ground while it pitches a fit and eventually turns it'self off. Putting the unicycle back down before it has turned off could result in damage to the floor and tire. Leaving the unicycle turned on while on public transport - Sudden unexpected movements can send the unicycle on a dangerous mission of it's own. Transporting upright without a case. When the electric unicycle is on it’s side I will not turn on. When transporting upright, if something hits the power button it will turn on. If the tire is touching something it will either burn rubber or move forward. Putting your unicycle in a bind - stopping against a curb then trying to climb the curb over amps the power system. Avoid such power binds. EUCGUY damages MSX pushing car. Water - As of today's date electric unicycles are not water proof enough. While some brands are better than others water can still be an issue. Although most models can handle lite rain, wet roads and shallow puddles it is best to keep them dry. The buttons and connections on top have been a problem. Check your model for warnings. Storage - Electric unicycles store an abundance of energy. If punctured the batteries can become a fire hazard. In the case of a home fire the batteries can add fuel to the flame. Charging - Batteries should be charged at least once every six months. It is best to unplug the charger from the power source and the unicycle once the unicycle is charged. Reduces possible hazards and damage. Links to my posts Thoughts as a beginner My progression starting out. This is why it is harder to get a larger wheel up a hill Expiation of how wheel size can affect force needed to climb hills This is my wheelhouse. Stand or storage I made for my unicycle in my work van 2007 E350 Ford van vs. MSuper cost per mile Cost of an EUC versus a one ton van cost per mile Cool Stuff Stands Hansolo and Tbx Nicolas Eugene Sazhin FoamieNinja
  14. Challenge accepted! In my original thread, I had realized I wanted to wait for the new wheels to come out before picking out my first wheel. But in my impatience, rather than buying a “starter” wheel I would quickly outgrow, I thought maybe I could get started on my “second” wheel, which was likely to be an MTen3. Sober voices advised me to reconsider, but I figured I could take a careful and patient approach since I was going to have to wait regardless. Worst case, I figured I would put the rocket back in my proverbial pocket and learn on my “main” once I knew what that would be. This is an MTen3 512Wh purchased from @Jason McNeil at eWheels (Thanks Jason!). For your advice and amusement, here is my learning log so far (2 days): Day 1: I inflated the wheel to 40 psi, and attached some clumsy ad-hoc bumpers made of pool noodles. The wheel arrived with the calibration obviously way forward of level, so I calibrated the wheel to what I thought was level (used a level on the pedals). 45 min in the garage: Damn, this thing is scary. How am I supposed to balance on it when it feels like it wants any excuse to bludgeon my ankles? (I wore some old steel-toed high-top sneaker/hiking boot hybrids I had on hand) I used two chairs to get mounted, getting a feel for the pendulum back and forth and how wheel decides which way to push. I tried to use a belt as a strap, but I wasn’t coordinated enough to hold the strap while using the chairs, and the this belt had some elasticity that made it feel dangerous to use, so I put it aside. I did a couple of supported turns around one of the chairs, but not without some minor mishaps. In trying to free ride about five feet to a third chair, the wheel took a couple of minor spills and one just strong enough to knock off some of the noodle bumpers but otherwise scratch little more than the pedals. I stopped out of exhaustion and heat — it’s already in the 90’s here — and although I was up for another go that night, other plans got in the way. No falls or injuries to myself. Some minor cosmetic injuries to wheel. Day 2: My butt and back are sore. The back I blame more on manhandling the wheel than on riding it. Not sure about the butt. Legs are fine, probably on account of a career that has me standing most of the day, and a habit of regular walking. I reduced tire inflation to 30 psi after reading more on forums. Wheel calibration still looked off, so I redid that. I improvised a better strap out of a luggage strap. My wife helped me secure my noodle bumpers better. 30 min on a stretch of sidewalk: I feel like such a tool. My wife offered to take my hand on a stretch of sidewalk back and forth a number of times, as I tried not to use more support than necessary. Alas, I needed a lot of support. Good thing she is, um, supportive. Nevermind that it looked to the neighbors like she was walking a still-dripping newborn calf. I stopped after my legs were feeling wobbly enough that it was getting harder rather than easier. The new strap worked out a lot better: No falls or injuries to myself (or my wife). No significant spills for the wheel. A few hours later... 30 min in the garage (shade!): Yeah, I don’t know about this triangle method. I went out mostly to try to practice walking the wheel under one leg and then lifting my off leg towards an eventual mounting maneuver. I experimented a lot with foot positioning and knee angles to try to feel what people are talking about with this. I got to where I could kind of pivot around on my off foot, but nowhere near being able to hold my off leg airborne for even a moment, except in an awkward hop. The height at which I have to bite the MTen3 into my leg feels way too low for that maneuver, like I would crack my leg in half trying to support my full weight. No successful mounts, until I resorted to using a wall for a bit. The improved sense of mass centering from the triangle training did at least make mounting from the wall feel easier. I had enough room to try and make a wide arc around the garage unsupported, but never made it more than half way, and never felt very stable on these attempts. I wonder if my second attempt at calibration did more harm than good. I stopped out of a combination of drenching sweat in the heat+jeans+gear and aerobic exhaustion from all of the stepping and bending over to walk the wheel back to the wall. The strap is still working well to prevent damage. My right inside calf is a bit tender, but no falls and no other injuries to myself. No new spills for the wheel. A couple hours later… Put 2 oz. slime in the wheel (exactly, as measured by kitchen scale) and reinflated to 32 psi — with @Marty Backe's video giving me the confidence needed. I then precisely re-calibrated on my most level surface with a level (looks good now) and did another 5 minutes of my garage antics to distribute the slime. Seemed stable enough. Two hours later... 15 min on a stretch of sidewalk: Who’s a good wife? She is! She’s a good wife! We repeated our morning walk, but by the end of this one we were going a little quicker, I was standing taller, feeling a lot more stable, and it probably looked to outsiders more like I was walking my wife than the other way around. If nothing else, I think I have the psi and calibration dialed in. I let go a few times, but only made it as far as about 5 meters before making a controlled step-off and tugging on the strap. I started to get glimpses of the “it” I’m trying to get, and stopped the session when I felt previously-unactivated leg muscles start to wobble out of energy. No injuries to myself. No new spills for the wheel. Looking forward to tomorrow evening, when I’ll have my next riding opportunity. Questions: Being the only one I know of around here with a wheel, it’s hard to know what’s normal for me, my wheel, or wheels in general. Here’s what’s on my mind tonight: From the first power up, the wheel has always had a kind of purring vibration and faint sound that fluctuates, like there’s an honest-to-god spinny thing in there... but I was under the impression that the only gyro is on a chip — that all balancing is handled by motor torque adjustment. Is this vibration just the feeling of the motor elements taking turns doing the microadjustments that keep the wheel stable, or is something wrong with my wheel? Unlike yesterday and this morning, as of this afternoon, when powering on the wheel, I got a double chirp, sometimes right away, sometimes a few seconds after. I thought maybe this was a battery indication, as I hadn’t charged since yesterday. But having charged up to full before my final session today (as indicated by green charger light on OEM charger), it was still doing it (the first time, but not on two subsequent times). What does this mean? I’d kill for a manual. Fully charged (per charger) and idle, WheelLog reports a 100% charge but a voltage only in the mid 60s. Isn’t this an 84v wheel? How does that work? Are the sport/soft modes worth playing with at my stage? Are they even staying at whatever I set them to? I thought I had read somewhere that the Gotway app defaults it to something every time it is loaded. Thanks for all your advice and support! I’ll keep the log going until you or I are sick of it. [I thought about putting this in the dedicated MTen3 area (feel free to move it?), but since my first wheel choice is unusual enough that I thought it might be of more general interest.]
  15. Hi all, I am new to this forum and this strange fascination, so I thought I might provide some background. A couple of years ago, on my way to a boat show, I stopped in disbelief at the roped-off part of the parking lot. I couldn't believe my eyes: here were people (or maybe robots or remote-control show-room dummies ?) gliding around without any apparent body movement ! As I watched closer, I saw they were standing on some kind of car battery sized box mounted on a single tyre, very strange. It turned out they were real people, demoing and selling a novel transportation method, allegedly easy to store on boats and fun to use in and around marinas. After I waited and watched, this guy asked me if I wanted to try. Yes, for sure, and I felt both elated and a bit ashamed of being walked like a dog, astraddle a one-wheeled car battery with encouragement of skimpily clad members of the opposite sex. The magic evaporated when we got to the little matter of price, no way I could spend more than 1500 € on something I wasn't sure I could either master physically or justify as a worthwhile investment. Fast-forward to last Saturday, the local supermarket has this parking-lot clearance sales with lots of stuff to look thru. I guess the boat show test ride somehow rewired my reptilian brain as I can not remember anything except coming back home with a unexpected piece of alien technology. Alien ? Star Trek for sure. When I try to get on top of the box, I really need to Klingon. It also gives a new insight to the standard Klingon greeting of "Today is a nice day to die." I have tried voice control, thought control, nothing works except the exquisite, detailed and (mostly) learned advice on this wonderful forum. Thanks, I will experiment and report back when I have something worthy of mention... Here are the specs and a picture, please don't laugh... Battery 132Wh Charger 67.2V 2 A Motor 300W Tyre 14x2.125 Range 15-18 km Max Speed 10 or 12 km/h Weight 10 Kg
  16. New Inmotion V8 arrived from SpeedyFeet (thank you Speedy Feet) yesterday (Friday 5th January), to great excitement. Unfortunately, the weeather here in Northern UK was terrible so couldn't get out. So day 1 of practice consisted of around 1 hour of standing on it and some wobbly transations across my office (around 3 metres wide). It felt like I was learning a little just getting the feel for balance. Wasn't long before right calve and right ankle in a bit of discomfort(!) Today (Saturday 6th January), better weather and a trip to a stiff fenced basketball area, identified as ideal for EUC practice. It has paths around the outer area of the basketball enclosed area so scope for doing circuits over an area 'around the outside' of the basketball pitch. Practiced for around an hour, but that was enough as fatigue set in. Really pleased with progress, and was able to ride multiple circuits around the exterior of the basketball court. Please note this was not by any means in a very controlled manner. Two particular areas I want some help/feedback with: 1. Foot position - after a while I placed my feet further back on the foot plates and I thought (but I'm not sure) that this seemd to give me better control and 'feel' for acceleration and braking. Is this issue of foot position important. Quite often, I'm so unsteady mounting that I don't get my feet in the same position on each side!! 2. The wobbles - as I felt I was improving and ventured to try going faster, I found that the wheel seemd to develop the wobbles. Any tips? 3. Ride in a straight line - Often I struggled to go in an entirely straight line, could this simply be a combination of me being a learner and not having enough speed makes me unstable and more prone to deviate off the straight line? Finally, one other thing I would say is that this thing makes you new friends! Virtually every passer by was stopping to watch or to chat, mostly in awe of this machine noone seemed to have ever seen. Little do they know how bad my riding is compared to you more experienced guys on this forum! Looking forward to tomorrow and going again
  17. Hello everyone! So, just got a shipping update, I am to expect my Ninebot E+ next monday! Must say I am super excited....I got to thinking after reading and watching some EUC training videos, a majority of the time in the beginning stages the EUC takes quite a beating! I saw one video where the battery ejected out of the EUC! after a small tumble in the parking lot. I was wondering what people here do to "protect" their investment while they are learning, and by protect meaning try to prevent it from getting beat up in the first few weeks of training. I do understand a tumble here, a dent there and scuffs and scratches but I would like to minimize that during my first few weeks until I get somewhat of a hold on what im doing! lol I was thinking maybe duct tape? draping an old sweater/jacket over the thing? cutting out an insulated shopping bag and taping it over the wheel....any thoughts??
  18. Hey All! One stop shop here!! Just as the title says, let me know what you have & need/want done to improve your EUC experience! Also providing maintinence plans & services! Talk to you soon!
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