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EUC

Found 4 results

  1. Hey y'all! I've spent a year riding EUCs and ripping through upgrades (IPS i6, InMotion V8, KS18L w/Pedal Upgrade, MSX100V 1.23kWh, and now a MSX100V 1.85kWh coming in the mail). I started off thinking "bleh, I'm not a speed demon like those crazies riding GotWays" so I started off small, but I found that I really love the speed and safety of having more power and keeping up with cars at 70km/h. The big tires also lessen my fear of potholes and other road surface aberrations. Alongside my other hobbies (skydiving and alpine climbing), EUC riding is up there on my favorites list. The EUC is also a convenient tool for short errands, last-mile transport, and walking the dog. I truly believe it's the future of urban transport. So having dropped another $2k on this hobby, I'm idly pondering the future directions that EUCs will take and how they can get better. Could we get together a wish list of near-term and long-term improvements that we'd like to see on the EUCs of the future? Here's my list. Short-term: Kuji Pads standard. Besides enabling tricks like jumping up curbs, Kuji Pads are a safety feature, helping reduce foot slip when traveling over irregular terrain. Long footpedals standard. To extract the most performance (and safety) out of your EUC, the pedals need to be as long as your foot. This allows your center of gravity to shift as far forward or backward as possible, allowing the greatest control input for rapid acceleration and deceleration. It also allows you to climb and descend steeper hills. With the upgraded pedals on the KS18L, I've climbed the steepest hills in San Francisco with no complaint. The same cannot be said for the standard short pedals on the MSX. Footpedal grind guards. Pedal scrape is no joke, especially if your pedal hits a bump in the road. Danger arises from the potential for the pedal to get "stuck," causing a sudden torque and launching you off the EUC. If the pedals had low-friction grind guards on their leading edge (made of acetal or UHMWPE, for example), this would lessen the odds of getting stuck. Of course, they would be consumables. Dihedral footpedals standard. The angled dihedral footpedals of the MSX seem weird at first, but they really secure your foot against the EUC—a huge benefit for reducing foot slip when hitting unexpected bumps, or when riding one-footed. Especially if you must make frequent stops, such as when walking the dog, this latter point is important for lessening foot fatigue. They also lessen the odds of pedal scrape on sharp turns. Long-term: Higher speed. Keeping up with cars is lots of fun, but also important for safety (drivers DGAF). I'd like to see future EUCs with a top speed of 80 or 90km/h. Bigger battery. Since drag force rises quadratically with speed, you need a bigger battery to go long distances if you're going fast. I'd like future EUCs with 3kWh or more. Shock absorbers. My knees are fine, but using them to dampen the resonant tank formed by the tire's spring force and the EUC's mass can be a challenge—as a human, my response time isn't fast enough to dampen it well; I need to anticipate and prepare for the shock. Especially on poorly maintained roads, it's difficult to keep up with the repetitive and unpredictable force impulses when traveling at speed, causing anxiety about foot slip when traveling on unknown paths at night. It would be preferred if shock absorbers (important: with dampeners) were integrated into the EUC structure, especially if the battery was kept unsprung. I imagine this would result in a supremely buttery ride. Belt-drive. This one's debatable, because it introduces another point of failure into the drivetrain, but... The power you can get out of a motor is proportional to the product of its size (namely, its volume) and how fast you spin it. With direct drive, where the motor is integrated into the wheel structure, you aren't spinning the motor very fast so its power density is remarkably low. As a result, for a given power level the motor must be really big—and neodymium and copper ain't cheap. If you added gearing or a belt drive, then the motor could spin faster than the wheel and be much smaller—like a hobby motor. This would substantially reduce the cost and weight of EUCs. Additionally, the sprung mass could be reduced and it would be easier to carry around. I take pause because it adds another point of failure if the belt breaks. While a drivetrain failure on a motorcycle might cause a fall, a drivetrain failure on an EUC will cause a fall. Maybe some belt-drive experts can chime in. Foot attachment. Having dihedral pedals and Kuji pads helps to reduce foot slip, but nothing can beat a true attachment. It needn't take much force, since it would only need to prevent your feet from slipping off while catching air, so "clip-in" pedals like bicycles or skis would be unnecessary. Preferably something that can be detached easily when you need to step or jump off. My thought at the moment is to place a magnet on the pedal or the side of the EUC, and to have a small steel plate that pins to the bottom or side your shoe that is attracted by the magnet. Articulating seats. Control of acceleration on the EUC arises from your ability to translate your center of gravity longitudinally, fore or aft of the tire's point of contact. Your ankles' articulation permits this motion. Fine control of steering is done by twisting your hips (and by extension the EUC) axially against your torso's rotational inertia, and course control by lateral translation of your center of gravity to the left or right of the tire's point of contact. The former is permitted by twisting articulation in your trunk, and the latter by articulation in your ankles and hips. On a seat that is rigidly mounted to the EUC, your ability to perform these translations and rotations is greatly diminished. In this case, you are reliant on the compliance in your butt tissue, which even for those blessed with child-bearing hips is not much. As a result, your control inputs on a seat are severely limited. This endangers you since you cannot steer or decelerate as quickly as may be needed in the event of an emergency. Articulating seats that permit a few centimeters of longitudinal and lateral translation, and several degrees of axial rotation, should greatly improve this situation. Maintenance schedules. As EUCs become faster and more powerful, and as more people ride them, it becomes more critical to keep them well-maintained. Manufacturer-recommended maintenance and inspection intervals may be wise. What's your wishlist? Cheers!
  2. If this isn’t okay tell me and I’ll take it down. Just curious as to what the average age is of an EUC rider . I’m 29 but it seems like I’m the minority . Everyone I’ve spoken to seems to be mid 40’s or above . So just curious what everyone’s thoughts are. Why isn’t EUC more prevalent among younger people ? What age did you start riding EUC?
  3. The van numbers are documented numbers and the EUC numbers are predicted. I know that you can get into some additional high fees for parking and storage for a car in the big cities. Cost of 2007 E350 1 ton van USA 100,000 miles Van $18,000 plus tax $1440 pus tag four years $128 plus Emissions four years $40 = $19,608 insurance $89 per month at 48 months $4,272 gas mileage 13 mpg $2.50 per gallon = $19,230 3 sets of tires at $580 $1,740 19 oil changes at $58 $1,102 air filters wiper blades signal light $242 only repair shiftier linkage $320 total cost $46,514 Then sold van for $3,500 End cost $43,014 that is $0.43 per mile Cost of 2011 ford Transit Connect mini van USA 96,000 miles Note: This vehicle was absolute junk. Could not go 5,000 mile without changing a battery or tire or repair. In the end it through a rod at 96,000 miles and was picked up for scrap metal. I am in a 2015 Ford Transit connect now and it is so much better all around. 86,000 miles so far. No repair yet but it is going to need CV joints soon. Van $23,000 plus tax $1,840 plus tag four years $128 plus emissions four years $40 = $25,008 insurance $89 per month at 48 months $4,272 gas mileage 19 mpg $2,50 per gallon $12,631 17 special tires ( front right every 19,000 miles ) nightmare $2,720 19 oil changes $58 $1,102 air filter, belts, wiper blades, head lights , signal lights $432 brake pads and rotors 4 times $970 $3,880 Battery every 11 months $120 $480 Repairs: coil pack $480 wheel bearing $1,264 wiper motor $357 $2,101 total cost $52,626 trough a rod at 96,000 miles, scrap picked up for free, End cost 52,626 = $0.55 per mile Estimated cost of MSuper 5,000 miles MSuper $1,880 1 tires and 2 tubes $120 ??? board ??? this is guessing future repair $220 Total $2220 sell for $300 end cost $1,920 ($0.38) plus charging at $0.01 per mile = $0.39 per mile Summery E350 1Ton work van $.043 per mile MSuper $0.39 per mile MSuper has yet to prove it's numbers and the vans are real documented numbers. I think you could do better with a KS16s but I know you could do better with a Honda Civic ( $23,000 at 28mpg and better resale at 100.000 miles) MPGe of EUC’s - Related post on electric miles per gallon equivalent.
  4. Good afternoon everyone, so glad to know about this community. I am so glad I picked the right forum! So, I started off with simple question asking which (2) wheel EUC I should pick up? With the help of all you wonderful members I have now shifted to an actual EUC. As I research, watch videos, read opinion posts and reviews it seems like I am going deeper and deeper down this rabbits hole. With all that said I understand now the importance of buying a EUC I will grow INTO, problem is I dont know which one!!?? I am leaning toward a 14" Kingsong, I stand about 5ft9 and hover around 140lbs....I would like something with a bit of range, dependable and tough! I have seen some great sales posted member to member, looks I will be saving a few hundered if not more buying second-hand, however the question is this......is buying second hand worth it? not knowing the actual condition of the EUC, how many miles one will last, problems the individual encountered or even worse, problems I will encounter!!, lastly the warranty and service piece of mind when buying it brand spanking new. Any thoughts?
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