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EUC

Found 15 results

  1. Hello, I am a 38 year old Army veteran, new to riding EUC and have a solowheel that I have been trying to learn. I've been trying to ride it for about a week now. I usually go to Patterson Park, and try to find an area with less people to notice me crashing. I have tried the tennis courts, but am not able to keep turning for very long in that caged in area. I have tried a basketball court, which is better. I have tried going down a hill and into the grass by the baseball field, which usually gets me a pretty good distance (probably 100 feet) before I crash it. I think the grass is bumpy though and it does make things more difficult. I wear lots of protective gear and have crashed countless times. Usually, I find a post or something to help me stand on it and then can go for a little while. There have been a couple times when I have been able to get going without holding onto anything, just pushing off of one foot. This often results in an even faster crash, though. I am able to travel sometimes 50 feet, sometimes 100 feet, and often much less. Sometimes I can go farther if I can find a straight area. I don't really feel safe or in control, but am continuously working to keep it going as long as I can. I know how to slow down, but am not very good at it, especially when my wheel starts to tilt and I am unable to recover. When the wheel starts tilting, I wish I could just slow down and step off, but usually this ends with me jumping off and the wheel slamming and scratching against the pavement. I have even had times where the wheel slammed into the pavement, hopped up into the air and did a few flips, and then slammed a second time while rolling over itself repeatedly. I have watched many videos and understand that sometimes you need to twist, sometimes you can bend a leg to turn, sometimes can just point your body in a direction. I am just not good at it. My wheel is pretty scratched up from all the crashes, even with the protective cover (which I have now duct-taped together because it is ripping at the seams from all the abuse). I am pretty sore from trying to ride this thing, but I do try to give it 30 minutes to an hour when I can. I am pretty sure that if I keep going like this, my wheel is no longer going to be functional. I am looking for anyone in the Baltimore area who would be willing to meet me in person to give me a few pointers before I destroy this wheel.
  2. Since the beginning I have been pondering on how to weight balance my EUC to minimize the wobble created by an unbalanced wheel. "Beginner legs" or tense legs do ofcourse cause wobble, but I don't want the wheel to add to it. This has also been asked a few times here, and today I've finally found a decent, reproducible way to do this! You need a kitchen scale with a precision of 1 gram, and ofcourse the weights. I bought the weights from a local store that sells parts and accessories to cars and motorcycles, among everything else. First determine which side to use for the weights: 1. Put a strip of masking tape to the tyre, from the air valve across to the other side. 2. Set up a (phone) camera to record video, as in the pic above. Slow motion video works best. 3. Sit on a chair and start the EUC. 4. Use both hands on the handle to rise the EUC from the ground. Find the balance so that you can keep the tire still. 5. Very slowly start to accelerate forward. When you feel the wobble at it's strongest, hold on to that speed for 5 seconds or so. 6. Stop and watch the video. You should see the wobble, usually both up-down and sideways. If the EUC turns right when at it's low position, attach the weights to the right side. If left, attach to the left. Now locate the spots for the weights. A kitchen scale rarely measures past 5 kg or so, so you need to distribute the weight of the wheel. Most rigid half a meter long things will do. I used a leftover piece of an in house floor board. Make sure none of the parts of the system touches anything soft, as this will mess the measurements. 1. Place the EUC on it's side on the very end of the board. Face the handle to the free end of the board. 2. Place the kitchen scale under the other end of the board. Place a small rigid box (or any suitable thing) between the scale and the board. 3. If the weight on the scale is out of range, move the EUC even further to the end of the board. 4. Turn the wheel by hand to locate the masking tape, and write down the number on the scale. 5. Very carefully rotate the wheel forward to the next motor bolt. This is usually 1/12th of a full cycle. Write down the number on the scale, and repeat until you are back at the masking tape. 6. Locate the position where the weight on the scale is at it's high point, and place the weight to the wheel. Repeat part 5 until the weight difference is under 5 grams or so. Now turn on and lift up the EUC again. If there is still a notable a side-to-side wobble, shoot another video. Locate the spot that is facing forward when the wheel turns to the side the weights are on. Move the closest weight to the other side, and check if the wobble went away. With the above process I was able to minimize the wobble to a tiny shake at full speed.
  3. So, its been about day (3) of some training (about 1 to 1.5 hours at a time); reading the Learning the Dynamics thread and some videos from @Marty Backe on how to mount and the "triangle method" . Currently I can barely roll/stop, roll/stop. I have been training on some thin grass at a local park and an adjacent strip of level concrete, I am starting to do much better on concrete! With all this said as I mount the wheel and try to get going forward as soon as possible, I notice almost immediately that my wheel will turn either one direction or the next and I get the wheel wobbling, I know this is part of the overall learning process but was wondering if there are any tips? Maybe foot position? Pinching the wheel with my ankles? maybe NOT pinching the wheel with my ankles? So far I am loving the experience of learning!
  4. After having used an electric skateboard around town (mainly for transportation) for the past couple of months I realized that enough of the roads around here are a hair too crappy for said skateboard — the board can take it, but I find the ride too rough. Now I'm thinking about switching from the skateboard to a KS16S (or a onewheel+, but that's another story), but having watched a crapton of EUC youtube videos and having browsed thru that "If you fell off EUC and got injured in the last few years, how are you all doing now?" thread, I had a few questions about cutouts: 1. How common are cutouts? As in are cutouts one of those things that aren't so much a "if you have one" thing as a "when you have one" thing? 2. From what I've seen and read I get that the beefier the EUC, the lower the risk of cutouts, and the closer you hang out at the max speed of your EUC, the higher the risk of cutouts, but what are some other things that raise or lower the risk of cutouts? 3. If I'm around 175lbs (80kg) and I don't plan to go much faster than, say, a bicycle that's cruising around (that's about as fast as I care to go on the electric skateboard), are cutouts something I should worry about if I'm looking at a KS16S? And unrelated to cutouts, I have two other noob EUC questions: 1. If I'm buying in the US, is ewheels.com the way to go? Or are there other sites I should also be looking at? 2. Is carrying grocery bags in your hands while riding an EUC a bad idea, balance-wise?. What about shifting the bags around like you might do if you were walking around with heavy bags and your hands were getting tired? 3. The inmotion V8 was the EUC I was actually interested in (because in addition to the 16" wheel and extendable handle in the KS16S, the V8 also had a kill switch for lifting it) but it sounds like ewheels.com is not going to carry it anymore, and I also got the impression that ewheels was the only official distributor of the V8 in the US. Are there other legit outlets that will now carry the V8 in the US?
  5. Rider's log (test ride #2): Slow going... Learning to ride a unicycle is hard (and tiring). Balance takes a lot of practice. No injuries to report... On my first test ride I was very timid and extremely afraid of falling at any speed. I barely got to the point where I could travel a few meters without losing balance when my inner tube's valve snagged the housing and tore. (Deflated tire caused valve to stick out at a precarious angle.) Bonehead rookie mistake to avoid -- Don't forgot to check if there's sufficient air pressure before a ride. This is me putting on protective gear to ride my KS14C... This is the park where I go to practice riding my wheel. (Note: it's a hot 90 degree Florida afternoon and learning to balance is exhausting.) This is 'the slalom' where I practice low speed maneuvers (6-12kph). (Note for beginners: These posts are the perfect height to reach out and regain balance...)
  6. Hi All, Just signed up on the forum. I started riding an airwheel a few months ago and am on an ips121 now. I have some video riding with some locals in Miami Beach..
  7. Anyone know why my KS-14C won't balance? When the wheel turns on it is not balancing. I try to enter into pedal calibration but it seems to have no effect on the wheel, just a beep. When I turn the wheel off it seems to require me holding down the on/off button to get it to even start up but then it just holds a long beep, until I turn it off. This wheel is frustrating...thanks in advance for any help.
  8. What I’ve learned/Tips on how to learn to ride from my own experience. Gotway ACMs+ Here’s where I’m at in my learning curve. I can now ride for blocks on city streets and sidewalks. I can get on the unicycle freestanding without the use of a pole or wall for balance. I’ve only ridden 26 total miles. 1. First, know that you’re going to fall and then fall some more and a lot after that. At least I did until I figured out a few things. Yeah I know, kinda obvious. 2. Your legs are going to get bruised on the inside near your calf muscles. Also expect abrasions on your legs as well. I just ordered a pair of ProForce Shin Guards from Amazon. I haven’t tried them yet and may not need them now, but I’m going to wear them at least till my bruises are healed. 3. Don’t learn to ride on concrete or pavement. Your unicycle is going to get really, really banged up. Also, because … No. 1. 4. Riding modes in the app. I have the ios app. There is soft, comfort and power mode. I don’t know what these actually do, but perhaps they’re self-explanatory. 5. The settings you enter in the app seem to be lost when you log out. So keep in mind that you may have to re-enter them after reconnecting your unicycle via Bluetooth. Also, if the app isn’t on (as in you pushed the power button to put your device in sleep mode) it will disconnect from the cycle and although the riding settings seem to remain, the app will no longer track your progress (time, avg. speed & distance). When you reconnect, the stats are reset to zero. Except total mileage of course. 6. Tilt Up Rocker Speed: I didn’t understand exactly how this worked and it caused me to fall 10 times more than I should have. Speed and balance are obviously interconnected, right? I thought that as a beginner, I should set the speed to the lowest. But THAT speed is barely enough for you to keep your balance. The Tilt Up Rocker Speed is also known as the tilt back. It serves as a warning that you are reaching the maximum speed you set. It isn’t a speed limit for the unicycle and won’t keep you from going faster than the set tilt back speed. What it does when you reach your maximum speed is tilt back the pedals. If you disregard this, and don’t slow down by leaning back, the tilt back will get so bad, that it is impossible to keep your balance and you’ll crash (so in a way it does limit your speed…by force). If you have a tilt back speed set, be aware of the feeling of the pedals. If your feet seem to be tilting up, slow down immediately and the tilt will go back to normal. You can turn the rocker/tilt off and go as fast as you want. 7. Pedal tilt: My unicycle came with about a 5 degree upward tilt (toes higher than heel). I’ve read that some riders prefer it this way and others say the pedals should be calibrated to as near level as you can get. I use the iHandy Level app on my iphone. I’ve tried it with the pedals inclined, level and declined. I didn’t notice much of a difference, so I’m sticking with level for now. One last thing about tilt. Setting the pedals at a decline will not keep the pedals from tilting back once your reached speed. The unicycle will continue to tilt back to the point you can’t keep your balance regardless of how much of a decline you calibrate your pedals. 8. Calibrating the pedals: Make sure your unicycle is on and connected to the app. a. Press the cog wheel (settings) in the upper right corner of the app. b. Select Calibration setting. c. You will get a warning pop-up, just press okay. d. You’ll hear 3 beeps and the gyro in the wheel that keeps it stable will disengage and the wheel will move freely back and forth as it does when it’s off. e. Place a level on a pedal or eye it and hold the wheel steady, tilting backward or forward to where you want the angle of the pedals set. f. Hold the wheel at that angle and press the on button to turn the unicycle off. g. Keep holding the unicycle at the angle you want and press the on button again. h. You’ll hear a succession of quick beeps and then a long steady beep. i. Turn the unicycle off again. j. Now the angle is set. k. Turn the wheel back on and the gyro will settle at the new angle. I think I’ve found the best way to learn to ride. It only took me a couple of hours over two or three days to advance to where I’m at today. Which is still novice. But I’m riding it. Yay! 1. I took my GotWay Unicycle to the local park. 2. I found a nice thick grassy area that had a nice straight path. Learning to ride in the grass has several benefits. a. I could crash at 20 Kpm/hour and not get hurt. Grass stained yes and bruising of my inner calf muscles from gripping the wheel and abrasions when making contact with the wheel while falling. Hence the shin pads. b. The unicycle won’t get beat to hell from bouncing on pavement in a spectacular Indy-500 like crash. c. The uneven terrain, bumps and the unexpected hole is great for learning to keep balanced. Once I learned to keep my balance in the grass, the street was cake. 3. I balanced myself on the pedals using a post or fence. 4. I set the power setting to Power Mode and I turned off the Rocker/Tilt back speed. 5. I leaned forward and allowed the speed I acquired to help my balance. 6. I rode from one pole, tree or fence to another and back and forth. 7. After I was good at this and could ride around the entire park in the grass, I worked on getting on the unicycle free-standing. It came surprisingly easy. The first time I tried it, I got about two feet before falling over. 8. I’m right footed, so I kept my right foot on the pedal and leaned the cycle over until the other pedal was an inch or so off the ground. You’ll feel the balance point. 9. I kept my left foot as close as possible to the left pedal, either directly next to it or a little behind. 10. I then quickly lifted my foot onto the pedal and leaned forward for speed and balance. I had a tendency at first to go left instead of straight, but after practice I got better. I just repeated this process over and over. The third phase was learning to ride on the sidewalks that twisted and turned through the park. To slow down for making corners, I found that rocking myself backward (slow) and forward (speed) to nail a good balanceable turning speed worked for me. It’s sort of like pumping the brakes on a truck while driving down a steep decline. I also learned how to bend my knees to accomplish sharp turns at slow speed. These are some of the things that I wished I’d known at first. For new riders, hopefully, this will help overcome some aspects of the learning curve that I went through. For the experienced rider, please comment, correct or add as necessary.
  9. So, as I wait for my GT16 to arrive (ETA next week), ..... Dug up an interesting tidbit from a Korean NAVER Blog GT16 Review [source] [google-translated] about the GT16 having app-less balancing / leveling capability: Turn off GT16 Turn on and hold GT16 until the last prolonged beep, then let go (sequence will be 4 short, consecutive beeps, then 1 long prolonged beep) Level the wheel Press the power button. Wheel will now be balanced. Apparently the previous Rockwheel TB14 had the same function.
  10. Soon, we won't even have to "learn" to ride our EUCs. Just hop on and glide as you wish.
  11. I am wondering how important 'natural' balance plays in riding skills; especially riding backwards and other tricks! Since fainting once about one year ago I find standing on one leg with my eyes closed very much more difficult. Before I could do a minute and stopped because I became bored. Now I am doing well to make 15 seconds!! I wonder what people like those doing tricks can do on one leg?
  12. Even when you're not thinking about it, your body is balancing—in everyday life, when you exercise, and during your active pastimes. Riding an Electric Unicycle (EUC) is no different. I just requires additional proprioception (body awareness in space) and semotosensory fine tuning. Good balance and a strong core go hand in hand when riding an EUC. Plus, the better you balance the less likely you are to fall or injure yourself. If you haven't thought much about maintaining—or enhancing—your balance, now is as good a time as any to start, especially if you are beginning to ride a EUC. I practice these techniques when I began riding my Ninebot One E+ and continue today. 1. Change Your Base of Support. Balance is your ability to maintain your center of gravity over your base of support. When you're standing up, your legs are your base of support. The wider your legs are, the wider your base is and the easier it is to balance. The closer your legs are together, the narrower your base of support is and the harder it is to remain balanced. One of the easiest ways you can challenge (and therefore help improve) your balance during any standing exercise is to gradually narrow your base of support until your feet and legs are together while you perform your exercise. Bring your legs closer together while you do standing bicep curls, shoulder raises, or any other upper body movements. Be sure to keep your abs pulled in tight and make sure you're not leaning backward as you perform your exercises. 2.Try It on One Leg. Once you've mastered doing an exercise with a narrow base of support, you're ready for the next challenge: balancing on a single leg. Instead of standing on both legs during some of the same moves above, try it on a single leg. Start by just lifting one heel (keeping your toes on the floor) while doing your upper body moves or working up to a single leg squat. As you get better, lift that foot off the ground completely. From there, you can play around with the position of your lifted leg—holding it behind you, in front of you, to the side or, for a greater challenge, moving that leg while you balance on the other leg and perform upper body movements. Just be sure to alternate legs to keep your strength and muscle tone balanced (no pun intended) between both sides of your body. Tip: You can also experiment with momentary one-leg balances. For example, on a forward lunge, lift your front or back leg for a moment each time your push up out of your lunge. 3. Close your eyes. Your sense of vision is a big part of the balance equation. It works hand in hand with the vestibular (inner ear) and proproceptive systems to maintain balance and prevent falls. By staring at a single focal point (minimizing your head and eye movement), you'll balance more easily. If you move your gaze or take vision out of the equation altogether, it's harder to balance. This option is definitely a challenge—not something for beginners and not something you can do in any given situation. You'll want to make sure you're in a controlled environment and that your body is planted (don't attempt this while walking or hiking or moving through space). You can start by just standing up tall and closing your eyes without moving. Over time, combine the narrow base of support with some one-leg balances while closing your eyes. You might be surprised how challenging it is to simply stand with your eyes closed, let alone stand on one foot or while doing a biceps curl. Just be sure to use your best judgment and listen to your body when trying this technique. By using these techniques and really paying attention to your body as you exercise, you should notice improvements in your balance, coordination, posture, core strength and agility when riding your ECU. This should help you to avoid spills during the learning curve and hopefully build your confidence when trying new and exciting riding techniques. Ride Safe! Daniel Cole –Rehab Specialist
  13. Even when you're not thinking about it, your body is balancing—in everyday life, when you exercise, and during your active pastimes. Riding an Electric Unicycle (EUC) is no different. I just requires additional proprioception (body awareness in space) and semotosensory fine tuning. Good balance and a strong core go hand in hand when riding an EUC. Plus, the better you balance the less likely you are to fall or injure yourself. If you haven't thought much about maintaining—or enhancing—your balance, now is as good a time as any to start, especially if you are beginning to ride a EUC. 1. Change Your Base of Support. Balance is your ability to maintain your center of gravity over your base of support. When you're standing up, your legs are your base of support. The wider your legs are, the wider your base is and the easier it is to balance. The closer your legs are together, the narrower your base of support is and the harder it is to remain balanced. One of the easiest ways you can challenge (and therefore help improve) your balance during any standing exercise is to gradually narrow your base of support until your feet and legs are together while you perform your exercise. Bring your legs closer together while you do standing bicep curls, shoulder raises, or any other upper body movements. Be sure to keep your abs pulled in tight and make sure you're not leaning backward as you perform your exercises. 2.Try It on One Leg. Once you've mastered doing an exercise with a narrow base of support, you're ready for the next challenge: balancing on a single leg. Instead of standing on both legs during some of the same moves above, try it on a single leg. Start by just lifting one heel (keeping your toes on the floor) while doing your upper body moves or working up to a single leg squat. As you get better, lift that foot off the ground completely. From there, you can play around with the position of your lifted leg—holding it behind you, in front of you, to the side or, for a greater challenge, moving that leg while you balance on the other leg and perform upper body movements. Just be sure to alternate legs to keep your strength and muscle tone balanced (no pun intended) between both sides of your body. Tip: You can also experiment with momentary one-leg balances. For example, on a forward lunge, lift your front or back leg for a moment each time your push up out of your lunge. 3. Close your eyes. Your sense of vision is a big part of the balance equation. It works hand in hand with the vestibular (inner ear) and proproceptive systems to maintain balance and prevent falls. By staring at a single focal point (minimizing your head and eye movement), you'll balance more easily. If you move your gaze or take vision out of the equation altogether, it's harder to balance. This option is definitely a challenge—not something for beginners and not something you can do in any given situation. You'll want to make sure you're in a controlled environment and that your body is planted (don't attempt this while walking or hiking or moving through space). You can start by just standing up tall and closing your eyes without moving. Over time, combine the narrow base of support with some one-leg balances while closing your eyes. You might be surprised how challenging it is to simply stand with your eyes closed, let alone stand on one foot or while doing a biceps curl. Just be sure to use your best judgment and listen to your body when trying this technique. By using these techniques and really paying attention to your body as you exercise, you should notice improvements in your balance, coordination, posture, core strength and agility when riding your ECU. This should help you to avoid spills during the learning curve and hopefully build your confidence when trying new and exciting riding techniques. Stay Safe! Daniel Cole –Rehab Specialist
  14. Has anyone used the balance adjustment function on the IPS zero? i did use it and I feel that now my pedals are a little bit tilted back constantly ! what would be the proper/best way to adjust the balance ?
  15. Hi, i own a smart balancing scooter and want to change and upgrade my battery. now i know everyone is saying the best battery pack is the samsung pack but when i try to find where to buy it online im running into deadends and different tech i didnt ask for. Can someone please help me.
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