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Papa Schultz

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About Papa Schultz

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  • Birthday July 6

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    Eure - Normandy - France

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  1. Papa Schultz

    Upper body armour

    Saw this on the speedy feet site, might be something? https://www.speedyfeet.co.uk/collections/featured-collection/products/flex-force-pro-top-full-armour
  2. Papa Schultz

    Your Proudest EUC Moments!

    Best moment was when I managed to go in circles for over 5 minutes, followed by figure 8s after endless 5 meter only (more or less) straight lines that lasted 5 seconds each. Another great moment is youngsters on their hoverboards watching you pass by crying something like « way stylish, sir!!! » (« trop, stylé m’sieur » in French...). Makes me grin over and over again...
  3. Papa Schultz

    Choosing a new EUC for commuting in Shanghai

    I actually learned on a ninebot One s2 and still own it together with my Inmotion V10F. Keeping the Ninebot for training and city commutes, whilst the inmotion is the overland tourer. Still like it a whole lot! The One s2 checks all your boxes except trolley handle, but I saw that some guys managed to install the Inmotion V5 trolley easily. The One S2 is small, maneuverable and should make your commute using 35-45% of the battery, depending on your weight and chosen trajectory. The form factor needs a short time getting used to, as it is curved and you don’t touch it at all with the upper part of your legs. You just stand on it balancing, but that becomes second nature quickly. It cuts down max speed gradually from 24 km/h at 100% charge to around 18 km/h at 20% charge, that’s at least what it did on my last ride. Never hit complete limp mode yet. One thing though: even though being relatively lightweigt, you wouldn’t want to carry it around over too long distances. Made some 700m close to a main road recently, I didn’t dare to ride on at 20km/h knowing vehicles fly in from behind at 90, so carried it through the farmland next to the road. Was a good workout, but wouldn’t want to have to do it for commuting...
  4. Papa Schultz

    Simple headlight anti-glare mod

    Ok, well noted, thank you. As soon as I get hold of it, I’ll definitely give it a try.
  5. Papa Schultz

    Simple headlight anti-glare mod

    I used black color for the contrast in the images, I think white will do as well. concerning heat buildup, I think the heat will build up mainly between the dies and the already existing cover glass of the EUC, due to the sealing for watertightness and lack of air exchange. The tape won’t add much to that as it is not thick and the light is not reflected back inside. Agree on the diffusion laminate giving a even nicer field of view, that’s definitely worth giving some thoughts, thank you for the hint. Any suggestions for use of a particular product?
  6. As a long time reader but not so long time contributor to this forum, please let me introduce myself: the name's Jens, I'm German native, but living (and riding my EUCs) in France, Normandy region. I have been learning on a Ninebot 1s2 and currently upgraded to an Inmotion V10F. Engineering background and studies, currently working in the automotive industry. OK, so when upgrading to the V10F, there were some additional features, the Ninebot did't have, for example the head- and taillights. Not the most important, but the ones this post is about. This of course brings a first night ride on the plan, thing I avoided on the 1s2, I didn't feel secure enough. I might need to add that I'm not riding in the city but countryside, smaller roads which are well shared between cars, bikes and pedestrians but at night completely dark. The headlight on the V10F is bright, and at first sight quite well oriented, you see the road and what's around you. Nevertheless the upcoming traffic let me know quite quickly that the light is blinding them. It is true for my wheel, as well as for most if not all others, the headlight is a more or less bright LED chip with either a reflector or a lens. These lenses/reflectors haven't been given a second thought obviously, as they are projecting a circular light beam which opens equally in all directions including the upper direction just like a handheld flashlight would. The part of the beam directed upside is blinding upcoming traffic, it is like driving your car or motorbike with the high beam permanently on. We could argue that this way at least we are seen which brings security but personally I don't agree. A blinded upcoming driver is disoriented and could steer towards you as he will by instinct fix the light source and automatically go that direction. Only few of us (manly motor bikers) are trained to do the opposite. I was thinking about the solutions that are known to me. How is it done for motor vehicles? Well for the older ones, a combination of reflector and diffuser was used to form the light beam to a certain shape. In modern cars the same is achieved either through ingeniously formed reflectors or lenses, which can even be oriented in some higher-end vehicles. In all cases, the beam is shaped in a way that the upper part is cut off or redirected downwards, the same for the outermost left part for left-hand drive vehicles (right part for right-hand drive). I wanted a simple solution which can be applied by everyone with the least modification to the EUC, especially if you still have warranty on the device. So what do we need? The EUC (obviously), it's software or phone app, some electrician's tape, a wall perpendicular to the ground (ideally a bright color, but not necessarily) and 6-10 meters distance to this wall. Preparation: power up your EUC and your app and make sure that the inclination of the pedals is set to your liking. Step 1: switch on the headlight and move your EUC the closest possible to the wall so that you see the light spot on the wall and have just enough room to tape a chunk (20-30 cm) of electrician's tape to the wall. The tape should form a horizontal line. The lower edge of the tape should be aligned with the upper limit of the light spot. Step 2: reverse from the wall, put a maximum of distance between your EUC and the wall in a way that you can still clearly see the limits of the projected light circle (6-10m should do) as well as the previously installed tape. Step 3 (base version): tape a piece of electrician's tape of 3-4 cm length horizontally over your EUC's headlight in a way that the upper limit of the projected light circle is cut and the limit corresponds to the lower limit of the tape strip on the wall. Step 3 (improved version): tape a piece of electrician's tape of 3-4 cm length over your EUC's headlight inclined to the side where opposing traffic usually comes up, i.e. inclined to the left for countries with LHD cars, right lane traffic and inclined to the right for countries with RHD cars, left lane traffic (in the UK and Commonwealth). Taking the example of the LHD version, the lower cut of the light beam (on the left) corresponds with the lower edge of the tape strip on the wall. I attached a small PDF file to put some images to these steps for your convenience. The improved version has the advantage that you still can see further in front of you, better anticipating your surroundings at night (pedestrians who want to cross the street, ...) as opposed to the base version where you only see what's on the road. I have tested both, I am more at ease with the improved version on our dark countryside roads. No more complaints from upcoming traffic so far. An even further improved version would need to cut the tape to shape, more or less a 'H' shape without the upper left and lower right dash for countries using LHD vehicles, right-lane traffic (without the lower left and upper right dash for countries using RHD vehicles, left lane traffic). I haven't pictured this as the idea came later on. Well, I hope that this first technical post of mine was understandable and will be of use for you. If any questions, comments or further improvement ideas don't hesitate. EUC headlight antiglare mod.pdf
  7. Papa Schultz

    V10F wheel need balancing?

    Had the same with my V10, same as Kristof said, decreasing the tyre pressure did a great part of the trick. Due to it having a high center of gravity by design (battery pack mounted on top), I am still not completely at ease, which still leads to some wobble from time to time in my case. It’s getting better, though.
  8. Papa Schultz

    My Wife Wants To Learn!

    And maybe keep the batterys low in the shell, not like INMOTION does. The high center of gravity of their products takes some time to get used to, at least for me...
  9. Papa Schultz

    My EUC Makeover! [FastWheel Eva Pro] #PimpMyEUC

    Yeah, after some more additional layers, especially in the center you‘re going to be riding a ball still absolutely like it!
  10. Papa Schultz

    DarknessBot - iOS App

    Thank you for the info, Ilya, much appreciated. Great app by the way, thank you for that, as well !
  11. Papa Schultz

    DarknessBot - iOS App

    Hello Ilya, could you please briefly explain what “premium” is?
  12. And completely geared up in protective gear, a good example for us all, Sir! from time to time I get the feeling that riding an EUC is like being on a Power-plate, you’re trying to keep your balance during the entire ride whilst definitely having more fun. I’m convinced that riding an EUC can help building up muscles and strengthening ligaments through permanent, but not excessive (most of the time) movement. Just my thoughts, might be wrong, but that would explain why most beginners get exhausted physically quite quickly and feel parts of their body/muscles aching they didn’t even know existed.
  13. Papa Schultz

    The future and the past

    Nice photos! Like the idea!
  14. Papa Schultz

    Tesla cut off crasch

    Ouch, looks bad, but glad to see you smiling on the photo. Get well soon. Maybe ask te doc if he could make the same blue “wristguard” for the other hand and one for the head, they look sturdy OkOk, easy one, apologies. Thank you for sharing. Personally it alwasy surprises me to see how hard it is for most of us to react at 35 km/h, no matter if you’re heavy, light, tall, small, beginner, experienced, young or not so young anymore. Makes me rethink my top speed and willingness to go faster and faster, especially when riding overland where a long, straight road makes you want to do so. Don’t have this issue in town, though...
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