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John Chew

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John Chew last won the day on February 5 2015

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  1. I hope you have a great time with it Spacejack. I was entirely "self taught" myself - or, at least, until very late in the process when I got a few pointers. If you're like me you'll find you fall off a bit during the early stages - I'd use a strap through the handle that you hold in your hand, not to "hold you on" but to allow you to stop the wheel falling over and crashing into things when you fall off. It'll save a few scratches and bangs. That said, once you "get it" you'll wonder why you ever had difficulty. It will become almost "instinctive". Have fun!
  2. Elsewhere arbee had been talking about "lever effect" or "torque reaction" problems and how they were or were not affected by the "hardness" or "softness" of the wheel. He mentioned that I stated there was no affect on the "torque reaction" limitation due to wheel hardness and invited me to explain my reasoning. Here is my reply to that invitation - re-posted here as a topic in itself. *GRIN* You're quite right, arbee ... I DO say the "stiffness" of the wheel is irrelevant regarding the "lever effect" or "torque reaction problem" of large diameter wheels. Please allow me to explain why. When you lean forward, you "ask the wheel for more power". That power comes in the form of "torque" (twisting force) applied to the wheel in a FORWARD DIRECTION. Action and reaction are, however, equal and opposite - Newton's third law. There is therefore an "equal and opposite" BACKWARDS torque applied to the casing of the wheel, and this RESISTS YOUR LEAN. It is literally "lifting your toes back up, and tilting you back again". The problem with LARGE diameter wheels is that they require more torque to drive - and more torque applied to the wheel means there's more "equal and opposite" torque applied to the casing. If you happen to be in a situation where the torque reaction happens to match the "maximum amount of lean" you are capable of - then you simply cannot "ask the wheel for more power". Even if the motor is technically capable of giving you a lot more, you simply cannot ask for it. YOUR ABILITY TO LEAN limits the power of the wheel, not actual limitations of the motor/battery/etc in the wheel. Now why does "hardness" or "softness" of the wheel not affect this? Well, it's because if you "lean forwards" with a certain effort you are applying a certain "forward torque" to the peddles of the wheel. Whether that wheel is "hard" or "soft" doesn't change how much force you are applying by a particular "lean" - all it changes is how much the peddles move UNDER that force. The "hardness" or "softness" of the wheel does nothing but change how far the peddles move as you lean - the actual TORQUE FORCES are the same. And because the TORQUE FORCES remain the same, it's still the same amount of "equal and opposite" TORQUE REACTION that will cancel it out. So if you're suffering from "lever effect" or "torque reaction" problems, you will suffer from them WHATEVER the "hardness" or "softness" of your wheel. It just might be that with a soft wheel you reach that limit with your toes pointing 10 degrees downwards, but on a hard wheel you reach EXACTLY THE SAME limit with your toes pointing 5 degrees down. The only difference, regarding "lever effect" or "torque reaction" problems, will be a few degrees difference in the angle of your feet at the time. Of course "soft" and "hard" wheels feel very different (and handle very different) in OTHER ways - but as far as the "torque reaction" problem limiting ultimate power ... no. No difference at all.
  3. I was interested to hear that young Austin Marhold was disappointed that he was able to "out lean" the GotWay MSuper - despite the fact that the MSuper has a 1500w (continuous), 3000w (peak) motor. I was also interested to hear that he found it far more difficult to "out lean" one of the Rockwheel models that had significantly less power. I started thinking about this, and I think I understand the "problem". For a long time I've been regularly talking about the problem of large diameter wheels and hill climbing ... and I believe that what Austin has come across is ANOTHER EXAMPLE OF THIS SAME PROBLEM. With large wheels what limits the power the motor can deliver is NOT the actual power of the motor - it's the ability of the rider to lean forwards hard enough to "demand" that power from the motor.This I describe as the "torque reaction" problem, and other people have described as the "leverage effect". It doesn't matter what you call it - it's very real, and very fundamental. Basically, as you lean forwards the motor's OWN TORQUE REACTION resists your lean - and when that torque reaction has risen enough to COMPLETELY resist the lean, that's ALL THE POWER YOU GET. Big diameter wheels give rise to a bigger torque reaction than small diameter wheels. I strongly suspect that NO 18 INCH EU EXISTS that Austin will not be able to "out lean". In fact no such 18 inch EU CAN exist - if it's designed the same basic way as our current wheels. Even if Austin found himself on an 18 inch wheel with a 10kW motor and LIGHTNING FAST response he would STILL be able to "out lean" it - because the "problem" is not the motor, or the response times, or the electronics, or the battery. It's the fact that it HAS AN 18 INCH WHEEL. This is why Austin finds the MUCH lowered powered Rockwheel less easy to "out lean". The small wheel allows him to USE the power it has - while the "torque reaction" problem means that he simply CANNOT USE the 1500/3000W that the motor of the MSuper has to offer. I suspect it doesn't matter WHAT the motor is. WHAT the electronics are. WHAT the response and settings are. Austin will ALWAYS be able to "out lean" an 18 incher.
  4. OK - I have RIDDEN my GotWay MSuper (YAY!). And I'm just going to stick down some initial thoughts in a relatively haphazard and confused manner. It's BIG. It really is. My first wheel was an Airwheel X3 (14 inch). Then I bought the Rockwheel 16 (16 inch) and that was a bigger beast. My IPS 111 (also 16 inch) was similar to the Rockwheel. I had thought "another 2 inches in wheel size, it's going to be about the same step up again as the Airwheel to the Rockwheel". Not a bit of it. It would, perhaps, be a little excessive to describe it as a one-wheeled M1A1 Abrams battle-tank, but there might be a TINY element of comparison ... *cough cough* Soviet T-34 *cough cough*. I found that the size meant I had to be more "deliberate" in mounting it. It just felt a bigger, heavier thing to get moving - and was less "fllickable into motion" than my IPS. That said, once I was on it, it felt ASTONISHINGLY stable. Utterly "rock solid" under the feet in a way that my IPS isn't. As it happens I tried both "comfort" mode and "madden" mode ... and I'll be honest with you, I really could hardly tell the difference. I haven't tried "soft" mode - maybe I should and will some time - but I found I rather liked what it was doing anyway, and just "settled" on the "middle of the range" comfort mode. It handles potholes and rough surfaces REALLY well. There's a place on my "standard 2.6 mile circuit" (my "first ride" was twice round that old, favourite route) where the path runs beside a load of trees, and the tree roots have caused the path to "buckle and crack" - which has then been rather crudely repaired. The result is about 50 yards where the path is REALLY quite appalling. When I rode my Airwheel around this circuit, this was a section that I felt genuinely concerned about. It was scary, and I have come off the Airwheel a couple of times there. On my IPS it's less scary, but I still find myself consciously thinking "Hmm - that rough bit ahead! Care needed!" On the MSuper I approached it with "IPS type" thoughts in my head the first time around - and found the MSuper just wafted over the roughness with surprising ease. The second circuit I just "rode along that bit of path". OK, I obviously avoided the BIGGEST bumps - but that rough bit of path really isn't an issue on the GotWay. Fabulous. Speed. Ladies and gentlemen - my name is NOT Austin Marhold. I am not a "fast rider" at heart. That said, part of my 2.6 mile circuit is along a cycle lane - and when I've ridden that part of the circuit on my IPS I've been very conscious that I was not really at what I felt was "proper cycle lane speed". I would ride that cycle lane section and keep glancing behind, concerned that I might be holding up someone dressed in lycra. On the MSuper I leant forwards, took the beast up to "double bleep" speed (whatever that is) or even, briefly, "triple bleep" ... and felt I was using the cycle lane at a speed it SHOULD be used, rather than a speed at which I would be a hindrance to cyclists. This is the CLASSIC situation where I argue for a decent speed range with EUs, and I feel the MSuper has emphasised that point. I can (and did) ride it at "ambling child" speed on pavements - keeping constant distance behind a woman walking with her little girl of, oh, about 8 or 9. BUT, come the cycle lane, it can be flicked up to a PROPER CYCLE LANE SPEED, and properly use THAT resource too. EXACTLY what I believe a "good" wheel should be able to do. Noise. It IS noisier than my IPS - and that's a shame. I like "whisper quiet" EUs, and the GotWay isn't whisper quiet. Don't get me wrong - it's nothing LIKE "Rockwheel noisy". It's just not "IPS quiet" either. BIT of a shame - but heck, I'll cope. Comfort. I suspect it was the unfamiliarity, but I found myself "gripping" the GotWay harder between the legs than I would with my IPS. This resulted in a little bit of a "feeling" (I won't say discomfort, but a definite "sense of firm contact") in the inner calves. I suspect that will disappear once it's not a "novelty" and I relax a bit more on it. The width does seem, though, to make it a little more prone to "feeling side slopes" than my IPS. There's a place on my 2.6 mile circuit where I ride along a pavement with a ... oh ... about fifteen degree slope to the left. I was left with the definite feeling of the MSuper "leaning left with the slope", and me having to "hold it upright" with pressure of the left, inner calf. Yes, the same happens with the IPS, but noticeably less - to me at any rate. Overall, yes. I like it. I think I need to ride it more and really get used to it - but it seems like a "good piece of kit". In fact I would have ridden it further today, except that the light was fading rapidly (and I haven't fitted lights to it yet), and it was RUDDY cold (so my hands were freezing, even in woolly gloves). I shall keep you informed of future feelings!
  5. *GRIN* You're quite right, arbee ... I DO say the "stiffness" of the wheel is irrelevant regarding the "lever effect" or "torque reaction problem" of large diameter wheels. Please allow me to explain why. When you lean forward, you "ask the wheel for more power". That power comes in the form of "torque" (twisting force) applied to the wheel in a FORWARD DIRECTION. Action and reaction are, however, equal and opposite - Newton's third law. There is therefore an "equal and opposite" BACKWARDS torque applied to the casing of the wheel, and this RESISTS YOUR LEAN. It is literally "lifting your toes back up, and tilting you back again". The problem with LARGE diameter wheels is that they require more torque to drive - and more torque applied to the wheel means there's more "equal and opposite" torque applied to the casing. If you happen to be in a situation where the torque reaction happens to match the "maximum amount of lean" you are capable of - then you simply cannot "ask the wheel for more power". Even if the motor is technically capable of giving you a lot more, you simply cannot ask for it. YOUR ABILITY TO LEAN limits the power of the wheel, not actual limitations of the motor/battery/etc in the wheel. Now why does "hardness" or "softness" of the wheel not affect this? Well, it's because if you "lean forwards" with a certain effort you are applying a certain "forward torque" to the peddles of the wheel. Whether that wheel is "hard" or "soft" doesn't change how much force you are applying by a particular "lean" - all it changes is how much the peddles move UNDER that force. The "hardness" or "softness" of the wheel does nothing but change how far the peddles move as you lean - the actual TORQUE FORCES are the same. And because the TORQUE FORCES remain the same, it's still the same amount of "equal and opposite" TORQUE REACTION that will cancel it out. So if you're suffering from "lever effect" or "torque reaction" problems, you will suffer from them WHATEVER the "hardness" or "softness" of your wheel. It just might be that with a soft wheel you reach that limit with your toes pointing 10 degrees downwards, but on a hard wheel you reach EXACTLY THE SAME limit with your toes pointing 5 degrees down. The only difference, regarding "lever effect" or "torque reaction" problems, will be a few degrees difference in the angle of your feet at the time. Of course "soft" and "hard" wheels feel very different (and handle very different) in OTHER ways - but as far as the "torque reaction" problem limiting ultimate power ... no. No difference at all.
  6. In which case I hope the Orbit turns out to be everything you hope it is - and I will be most interested to hear your views when you get it. However I STILL feel that the salesman you dealt with was feeding you a delivery date that he KNEW was "pie in the sky" ... so even if you don't accept a refund, Inventist still owes you an apology!
  7. To be blunt, not good customer service AT ALL from whatever salesman you dealt with. If Inventist were serious about their customer service they would be contacting you, apologising and offering you the option of a full refund. So, Inventist ... are you going to do that?
  8. I can't speak for the TG-T3, but my first EU was an Airwheel X3 which has basically very similar "figures" for power and battery capacity. If the TG-T3 is like my Airwheel it's a relatively cheap, somewhat underpowered, but perfectly "functional" wheel. Yes, you might find it a bit gutless, but it should be able to climb most "reasonable" hills and have a range of about 6 miles (10Km). Ride it within its capabilities and it should serve you well.
  9. Chinese new year? That's less than a month away, isn't it? From the way Inventist was speaking it didn't sound like it was going to be out that fast - after all, they're "focusing on the Solowheel Xtreme", and my understanding is that even THAT isn't out yet.
  10. Hello. This is my first MAJOR posting on this forum (there was an earlier, small one about the IPS 111/132, but that was largely insignificant!). However, as people who are also on the Electric Unicycles group on Facebook will know, I'm CONTINUOUSLY sticking my oar in and giving opinions ... However, back to the subject in hand. Those on the Facebook group will know there was a recent incident where one of our fellow EU riders was crossing a road and got hit by a police car, being driven the wrong way down that piece of road at high speed. I won't go into details (it's not really my place to do so) but THANKFULLY our fellow EU rider "got away" with it - only minor injuries and a smashed EU. It could have been SO much worse! FIRSTLY I WOULD LIKE TO MAKE AN IMPORTANT POINT. Yes, sometimes police cars are called to emergencies and have to be driven fast and not "in accordance with the rules of the road". We all accept that. Yet when this happens it puts a great EXTRA RESPONSIBILITY on the police driver. He's doing things people DO NOT EXPECT HIM TO DO (like driving the wrong way down the road!) and it is HIS responsibility to ensure nobody gets hurt because he's doing it. If he's driving the wrong way down a road it IS possible that people will not realise what's happening, look for traffic approaching the "right" way - and when they see none step into the road. The police driver has to UNDERSTAND AND ANTICIPATE this risk - and DRIVE APPROPRIATELY, so that no-one gets hurt. In this particular case, the EU rider DIDN'T realise what was happenning, and got both hit and hurt by the police car. This was something the police driver should have anticipated and not allowed to happen. This incident is, I believe, the POLICE DRIVER'S FAULT - if fault is to be allocated. Yet now let's get away from finger pointing and fault allocation, and to another point this incident raised. THE EU RIDER WAS WEARING HEADPHONES, LISTENING TO MUSIC, AND DIDN'T HEAR THE POLICE CAR'S SIREN. Does this make this incident the EU rider's "fault"? No, it doesn't. Not even slightly. You have EVERY RIGHT to listen to music as you ride your EU (or walk, or run, or skateboard for that matter). HOWEVER ... IF he had not been listening to his music and heard the siren, then he would have been aware of what was happening. He would not have moved off the pavement and he would not have been hit by the police car. PEOPLE MAKE MISTAKES. They say "to err is human", and it is. Sometimes, indeed MOST of the time, we get away with those mistakes and no-one gets hurt. Occasionally people DO get hurt, or even killed - as could have happened in this case, the EU rider in question should consider himself a very lucky man. However there are things we can do to MINIMISE the risks we face. Not only the risk of making mistakes OURSELVES, but also the risk of suffering the UNFORTUNATE CONSEQUENSES OF THE MISTAKES OF OTHERS. When riding our EUs our EYES may tell us what is happening in front of us, but it's our EARS that give us information about what is happening EVERYWHERE ELSE. If we render ourselves "deliberately and artificially deaf" by means of headphones and music, then we are inevitably limiting what we are aware of - and by doing so we increase the risks we face. Your EARS are as much "protective equipment" as any helmet, elbow pads or knee pands you might wear. Now everyone must make their own choices, of course - but for me, I DO NOT WEAR HEADPHONES AND LISTEN TO MUSIC while riding my EU.
  11. As a rider of the IPS 111 Generation 2 (which is, I understand, the same thing under a different name). I agree that this is a nice wheel. It is quiet, smooth, and I have also done 10 miles without the battery indicator showing the battery to be near the end (it began "slow flashing" at about 8 miles - and was still only "slow flashing" at 10) - so a range "to flat" of 12+ miles seems likely. My only critisism is that it would be good to have just a TINY touch more speed - even for pavement work. You seem to be getting "toe lift" not much over 8 or 9 mph. Even for a "pavement only machine" being able to hit 10 without it beginning to "complain" would be nice.
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