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Obee

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About Obee

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  • Location
    Keene NH, USA
  • EUC
    KS 18XL

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  1. Might be an American attitude but none of those categories really fit when you believe you are allowed to do something as long as it's not prohibited by law, rather than believing you can do nothing the law doesn't specifically allow. The best chance for staying under the radar is remaining niche and people who use them don't hurt themselves or others. (For places that already have laws that apply to EUCs it's too late of course. My experience is based on New Hampshire USA where there doesn't seem to be any laws that apply to EUCs currently)
  2. No, maybe 3 strikes and you are out works for many things. But when your first strike is a human death, that's all three strikes at once. Especially a hobby which is supposed to be fun. How fun is it when every time you hop on it reminds you of that time you killed a lady?
  3. Part of freedom is responsibility. If you want the freedom to take chances then you need to be prepared to take responsibility if it goes bad. I am with you on keeping freedom. I do not agree that you can do that while claiming no responsibility for things that happen.
  4. This notion that if it was a bicycle, you wouldn't blame the cyclist... Couldn't be more wrong. The idea that an accident like this is a blameless act of God type thing just isn't so. If the op story is largely true, and who knows if it is, it is likely not completely true concerning details of speed and who leaped where and when. The details largely don't matter. The unicyclist was at fault and is responsible for a death. If there aren't any legal repercussions then at a minimum this person should never touch an EUC again. He had his chance to try it. It didn't work out.
  5. Is this the incident? https://www.devonlive.com/news/devon-news/elderly-woman-seriously-injured-after-2880229 Wasn't able to find more information. Some elements differ from OP story, many similarities.
  6. I have been riding mountain bike trails in Franklin NH and Ascutney VT this week on KS 18XL. That's what got the brain working on ideas. (ideas which started with improving my pad placement which obviously is where my energy should go!) In the cold light of day after riding some trails my idea doesn't seem as brilliant as it did in the shower.
  7. I should have been more clear with the use case as I was really thinking about off-road riding and jumping. I will concede that the main problem is being able to instantly disengage... That would be the challenge and it would be crucial. As for contact point... Your entire pedal is still the contact patch for your foot. It just happens to be physically attached at one point.
  8. This thought struck out of the blue while taking shower: For next level unicycle control we need to have our feet attached to the pedal. The initial thought is bindings like you have with skis and snowboards. These will detach when a strong enough force is applied so you don't break bones in a fall. The problem with bindings is that they aren't quick enough to release when you just need to quickly bring a foot out, but that's exactly what clipless bicycle pedals do! Picture a regular unicycle pedal, only there is a little recessed pocket in the forward middle of the p
  9. Maybe someone has access to one of these?
  10. I will admit, I still want to test it. I believe these machines are capable of distinguishing a side lean force relative to the horizon vs a side force relative to the machine. But imagining I am the designer; I want the machine to turn off when it crashes. So a side lean angle shutoff is for that purpose. But that purpose is served by measuring the angle relative to the machine rather than the horizon. Now as I noob I have no idea what has been tested before my arrival on the scene. Maybe it's been tested already. But I will try to test anyway.
  11. Obee

    THE VIDEO THREAD!

    New rider. Keene, New Hampshire, USA. Ran out of vodka so took the scenic route to the liquor store. Day 14 with first wheel. KS 18XL
  12. Watching this vid Specifically starting at 2:14, got me thinking. Say you are riding an EUC with a 45 degree side lean angle cut off around a banked turn... Say you have a good steep berm of 45 degrees and your speed is such that the EUC follows the bank angle with centrifugal force vector more or less straight up and down RELATIVE TO the EUC while the EUC is actually 45 degrees tilted relative to "artificial horizon"... At this point are you on the verge of cut off, or does the EUC think it's more or less "straight up"? Or asked more simply: can you lean these
  13. Here's a picture of these "door bumpers". It's not pretty but could be better for someone taking a bit of time with a razor. http://imgur.com/a/1k0Cam4
  14. Just a theory, but I believe "clamping on" to a wobble wheel is exactly wrong. Many people have expressed some variation of "be relaxed", and my guess is that this is indeed key. The wheel needs to be able to float a bit on its own. (I am relatively new rider so willing to revisit thoughts on this ongoing) In the motorcycle world there have been examples of wobbles so extreme that the rider gets thrown off, at which point the motorcycle sometimes manages to calm on it's own a ride for awhile sans rider. Suggesting that rider input was the culprit all along rather than the mac
  15. Was looking at making forward and backward leaning pads for my KS 18XL. Saw those pads on Amazon. Also saw Kuji vid about making your own with neoprene. Ended up trying this off of Amazon, about $15 https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07PQR7FG4?ref=ppx_pop_mob_ap_share They are door bumpers for a car parking in a tight garage. Cut them in half lengthwise and you have approx 6 inch by 4 inch by 1 inch thick soft pads that stick where you want them. It's a set of 4 so if you cut them in half that's 2 full sets of Kuji pads. They adhere well to plastic, but you can peel them off
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