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Zopper

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About Zopper

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  • Location
    Czechia
  • EUC
    Inmotion V11: 0+ km, V10(F): 3000+ km, V5F: 500 km

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  1. But they don’t lie… It’s just a pure coincidence that these two marks are so similar.
  2. Integrated circuits are cheap. It might be actually easier to slap a 1wire or I2C compatible chip on it and do some some two-way communication over a single wire with standard tools and libraries.
  3. As other said - it’s because you are standing still. When I’m doing longer rides, I do various “exercises” to support blood flow into the feet. Mix it according to your abilities and situation. - Carve, accelerate and brake sharply - Clench and relax feet muscles - Lift part of the feet (i.e. stand on the heel or toes) and then switch the part to the other - Strong asymmetric stance with half of one feet off the pedal (a variation on the previous point) - Lift the entire feet, ride one-legged and clench and relax the muscles in the airborne feet - Get off and walk a bit - especiall
  4. If you want to lift the wheel into the air, some jump pads are a good idea. But that might not be necessary for going over curbs, at least under a certain height. With just a bit of training and experience, you can learn how to let the wheel climb up on its own some 2-3 inches while you do a half-jump - so the wheel does not have to lift up your weight, but you still keep some control over it, your feet are still on the pedals.
  5. It doesn’t. The center of gravity (of EUC+rider!) is still above/in front of the contact patch. The moment COG moves behind the point of contact, you either brake (if you turn the wheel with you) or you fall on your bum (if you bend your knee and keep pressing on the toes). That’s the basic mechanics of controlling EUC. It is a balancing device, nothing more. It tries to balance the COG above the contact patch. You simply can’t have COG behind the contact patch and keep accelerating without an immediate fall.
  6. I’ve seen a little girl with a decent control of a V10. The EUC might be about two thirds of her own weight and yet she is able to ride it even in a light offroad. It’s physically exhausting for her, though, because she has to move all around a lot.
  7. Well… you can. But you are exceeding the limits it was made for and you risk that something will die. There is no fuse that would stop you after getting over 5A. According to Samsung 50g cell datasheet, standard charging current is 0.3C - 1.6A. And V11 is a 20s4p pack, meaning 4 cells in parallel and 20 in series. For current, it’s only the 4p that intrigues us. Because the current splits equally, so each parallel cell means another 1.6A faster charging. That gives us that the battery cells can easily handle about 6.4A charging. So the 5A charging is almost as high as the recommended val
  8. You might be lucky, in a way. You have no idea how hard it is to resist, how hard it is to not buy all new eucs, when every time you look at another euc a soft female voice whispers into your ear: “We need this thing, my precious, we need it. Buy it for us.”
  9. I’m letting an app to do it for me. Euc.world, DarknessBot, etc… Just log your rides and you can see what was the battery at any moment.
  10. @John A Peters You are getting it the other way around, I think. Braking (or accelerating) doesn’t move CoG (of you + the wheel) away from the contact patch. By moving CoG away, you induce it. And the moment the wheel starts applying a torque in either direction, the forces begin to equalize until the CoG is effectively above the contact patch again, after accounting for the change of “down” vector caused by acceleration. And this happens many times per second. The problem of wobbles is in your body and mind, in getting into a resonance when your muscles try to compensate and end up overcom
  11. @UniVehje I mostly agree, except that experienced riders don’t get them. They can get them too, it’s just much rarer and usually accompanied/caused by factors like cold weather, tiredness and so on - stuff that limits the control of muscles, stuff that makes you ride more stiffly. And of course, these riders are much more likely to stop wobbles in the beginning by a changing something in the ride without even thinking about it, so they disappear quickly.
  12. As an attachment (Add Files), once your account allows it. Or you can upload it somewhere else (https://ctrlv.link) and paste the link from there.
  13. As a no-kids-yet-but-maybe-one-day, remembering my own childhood, I think that a kid without bruises and scratches everywhere didn’t live through the summer, just existed through it. In a state of perpetual boredom. And I say this as someone who spent half of the summer in a library with my nose deep in books.
  14. Even a V5F can be an offroad wheel. You just have to go slow with really springy knees and do a good job picking the trail. It’s better than no riding at all, but every bigger wheel is better. And @RockyTop wrote it perfectly. Unsuspended wheels… It’s kinda like changing your soft bed for a thin layer of foam on the forest floor. You can sleep on it, get used to it, but…
  15. @evans036 You can make your own sounds using the official app. Just make sure to not override speed/power warnings with silence. But if just you delete those sounds, it will beep instead of speaking, which some people (like me) prefer.
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