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erk1024

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About erk1024

  • Rank
    Advanced Member
  • Birthday 06/19/1967

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  • Location
    Boca Raton, FL
  • EUC
    MonsterV3, Nikola+

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  1. I think it's also good to consider that after-market modifications can fail. Several of the battery fires have happened to battery modified wheels. The problem is that when you modify it, you're invalidating a lot of testing that the factory and other riders have done on the wheel.
  2. It could be a good option for people who want that motor, but not such a large wheel. My Monster V3 is my favorite, but it's not what you'd call nimble. It's hard to tilt the body enough to make a tight U-turn for example.
  3. How is the acceleration with the 3500w motor? Does it require a lot of "input" to get it going?
  4. At 18:24 he says he liked the wheel much better than the Veteran Sherman. That's high praise. Still, in general, the reviews for this wheel haven't been very enthusiastic. They didn't seem to mention a lack of responsiveness, but it's hard to tell from Google's automatically generated subtitles.
  5. Weirdly, these just go away with experience. A good way to reduce wobbles is to stand a bit straighter. You knees should always be bent so you can soak up bumps, but how much they are bent makes a difference. This also helps with acceleration and braking wobbles. You might also experiment with foot position. If you're too far back, then you have to put extra pressure on the front of your feet, and that extra pressure can lead to wobbles. As you gain experience, wobbles just tend to go away. Not sure if that's just more leg strength, or your brain figures out how to dampen them out.
  6. This is a big problem actually: people buy an EUC and try to ride it without checking the tire pressure. Often the tires are close to being flat.
  7. It's not up to us, of course. I think the manufacturers want to make their wheels sound bigger, so they are using outer diameter. Seems reasonable.
  8. We seem to be transitioning from a measurement that doesn't have a direct correlation to outer diameter, which is a good thing. At least it's true for the Sherman and Monster Pro.
  9. Just keep in mind the the current monster's tire is actually 23.2" outer diameter and the new Monster Pro is 24" inches in outer diameter. So only 0.8 inches bigger in terms of the wheel. Also the shell seems to be a bit wider.
  10. You have to factor in the rider's weight. The total weight of a 200 pound person on a 86 pound wheel is not 50% heaver than the total weight of a 200 pound person on a 50 pound wheel. So a heavier, more powerful motor should be a win. Of course, you have to also consider the rotational inertia of the larger motor. It seems like if the motor is actually as powerful as it's claimed to be (a big 'IF'), then adjustments to software / control-board could possibly fix what @houseofjob is feeling. Hard to say. And the V11 seems to do fine with a hollow core motor. Whenever you make a big change, ther
  11. I wonder what the fluid was that came out when Vee tried to pump up the shocks. Anyway, her second video review had a lot more information. I gave it thumbs up.
  12. Being able to test ride a wheel before purchase would be AWESOME!!! Not sure how I could arrange it though.
  13. I have two great wheels already, so I'm fine waiting for some more people to try it out. Vee's pre-review was more a list of issues she had with it, so really incomplete. Nothing about the power of the new motor. Torque vs speed. etc. Vee's issues: Lack of instructions Didn't like the lift button placement / size Didn't like the speaker placement Doesn't have the suspension tuned yet Super heavy at 85 pounds Hard to get an overall impression. And suspension is not supposed to eliminate all bumps. It's mean't to take the sharp edge of that initial impact
  14. Kuji also has a good video. The thing that these videos don't seem to tell you is that if you are falling to the right, then tilt the wheel to the right! You are literally tilting the wheel left/right between your legs by putting unequal pressure on the pedals--to get the wheel to turn in the direction you want. The reason you're turning is you want to get the wheel back under you. So if you're falling to the right, tilt the wheel to the right. And if you're falling to the left tilt the wheel to the left. Now in order for this to work, you have to be rolling forward at a reasonable speed. If y
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