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Showing content with the highest reputation on 06/23/2019 in all areas

  1. 17 points
    Apologies for the late attendance to the party. Since receiving a 2nd board failure (this case was different, it was powered on from a stand still & didn't respond), including Marty's, within two weeks of shipping out the first batch of Nikolas, I've reached out to Linnea on Thursday to try to come up with an action plan to see what options are available to greatly reduce/eliminate the risk of these MOSFET thermal overload events. The evidence from both of these failures has marked similarity in outcome (see below), where this glue may be acting as a thermal barrier, not helped by the absence of thermal paste on the underside of the metal heat transfer surface. One option being explored, is to recall the boards. remove this glue, & apply the thermal paste. To date Gotway have shipped 600 units; they say they have not received reports from other regions of this failure—it's likely more will trickle in in time. Putting out an official recall is not something to be taken lightly; in their defense, they're probably looking for a few other reports, before taking this step. Gotway have a lot of experience with building high power motor vehicles; they had gone through several rough patches, particularly with reliability of earlier generation boards, with the weaker MOSFETS, but at least then they were pretty consistent with applying liberal quantities of thermal paste to this underside. It was baffling to me why they would go back to an inferior TO22x FET package AND now we learn about the lack of thermal paste. From my experience, such oversights are usually not the result of penny-pinching, but execution on the production line, where the factory needs a ruthless eagle-eyed floor manager, to see that every step of assembly is done by the book. The silver-lining to all this, is that an early finding in the production cycle is a necessary facet to a small-scale non-ISO production facility, where the manufacturer's financial pain of having to deal with a crisis, means that they will be imbued with a sense that this situation must never occur again. For all current Nikola owners, please hang in there, we should have an action plan in the next few days. EDIT: To anticipate questions on the 100V Nikolas, they are using the TO247 MOSFET package. The first production of these special edition 1845Wh variants is still underway, so there is assurance that in light of this episode, they will getting the thermal paste treatment!
  2. 12 points
    Apologies for the late attendance to the party. Since receiving a 2nd board failure (this case was different, it was powered on from a stand still & didn't respond), including Marty's, within two weeks of shipping out the first batch of Nikolas, I've reached out to Linnea on Thursday to try to come up with an action plan to see what options are available to greatly reduce/eliminate the risk of these MOSFET thermal overload events. The evidence from both of these failures has marked similarity in outcome (see below), where this glue may be acting as a thermal barrier, not helped by the absence of thermal paste on the underside of the metal heat transfer surface. One option being explored, is to recall the boards. remove this glue, & apply the thermal paste. To date Gotway have shipped 600 units; they say they have not received reports from other regions of this failure—it's likely more will trickle in in time. Putting out an official recall is not something to be taken lightly; in their defense, they're probably looking for a few other reports, before taking this step. Gotway have a lot of experience with building high power motor vehicles; they had gone through several rough patches, particularly with reliability of earlier generation boards, with the weaker MOSFETS, but at least then they were pretty consistent with applying liberal quantities of thermal paste to this underside. It was baffling to me why they would go back to an inferior TO22x FET package AND now we learn about the lack of thermal paste. From my experience, such oversights are usually not the result of penny-pinching, but execution on the production line, where the factory needs a ruthless eagle-eyed floor manager, to see that every step of assembly is done by the book. The silver-lining to all this, is that an early finding in the production cycle is a necessary facet to a small-scale non-ISO production facility, where the manufacturer's financial pain of having to deal with a crisis, means that they will be imbued with a sense that this situation must never occur again. For all current Nikola owners, please hang in there, we should have an action plan in the next few days. EDIT: To anticipate questions on the 100V Nikolas, they are using the TO247 MOSFET package, the first production of these special edition 1845Wh variants is still underway, there is assurance that in light of this episode, they will getting the thermal paste treatment! 
  3. 11 points
    I'm not too worried about a delay. Rather they take their time to get it right. I'd take quality control over production speed anytime.
  4. 11 points
    Gotway: "LOL we put glue on our mosfets!" Kingsong: "LOL see you in 2020!"
  5. 9 points
    And this is why i chose to buy from @Jason McNeil. It might be my last Gotway but not my last purchase from Ewheels with this level of customer service. Thanks to @Marty Backe for such a thorough analysis of the problem.
  6. 8 points
    Gotway is adhering to their stereotype (iffy design and/or manufacture) and KingSong theirs (late deliveries).
  7. 7 points
    I had the wheel longer than Chris and was able to get some solid riding time in; may be 50 miles? so I'll try to do a quick summary: Problems- the high speed lumps, at top speed, around 28mph or above, the wheel has a slight shake, it feels like you are running across a series of painted lines on the road. This was an improvement from before bust still noticeable. The firmware still feels beta, the battery level stick at 100% so I have no idea how much power I have left. haven't dug in to see if there are any other weirdness. The wheel- This is the most fun wheel I have ridden so far. There I said it, I love the Z10 more, however it is a wild ride and you need to constantly be on top of it. The 16x have the same sense of weight and stability in turns but is completely predictable. Acceleration and braking both feels smoother than the Z10, more subdue which is both a good and bad thing. The wheel is dead quiet, in a quiet room I can actually hear the hum when I turn on its head light. no one will know when you come up behind them. You can ride at the top end (31mph), but I feel slightly iffy doing it. However I feel more confident doing so than when I am riding the Z10. It is very very maneuverable, carving feels great on this wheel. the body feels very comfortable between your legs, I like to keep my right leg bend with my right knee right up against the body, works very well with this wheel. They weren't kidding about the trolley handle, compare to the handle on this, the one on a z10 is like a random tree branch you picked up on the road and duct taped to the wheel. Head lights works very well, I don't like lights in general but the angle and spread works fine. The placement of the LED strip is not ideal; its right on the corner and unprotected, if the wheel takes a tumble there's a good chance the lens will get scratched, cracked or what have you. Not sure about real range, since I can't see the battery level, but I rode the wheel hard today 30 miles including up and down the tall Queens borough bridge twice and no throttling at all. Have to say this again, this is a fun FUN wheel to ride. Will try to answer any question anyone have; wheel is going to Tishawn next.
  8. 7 points
    Don't give too much value to the theoretical maximums of the datasheet. They're kinda like the range-values of wheels, you can use them to compare one mosfet (wheel) to another, but in real-life, other factors limit you to much lower numbers (at least in continuous current / power dissipation). TO-247 can take more abuse thanks to a much larger contact area for heat dissipation (at least when properly connected to a heatsink or whatever for dissipating the heat). The more important numbers are the Rds(on) (internal resistance when fully conducting) and the thermal resistances (which are usually the same for the same casing), but you'd need to know the average current / power dissipation and heatsink thermal resistance to ambient to calculate anything more meaningful.
  9. 7 points
    Hsiang now has his review up.
  10. 7 points
    Excellent point! Yes, we do not know whether all of the Nikola assemblers are using the glue trick to help attach the heatsink. I just wanted to add that we now have photographic evidence of THREE boards that have contamination that we believe is hot glue on the MOSFET tabs. The pictures shared by @Marty Backe and @Jason McNeil were examples of blown boards with this anomaly. My Nikola board had not failed. I chose to strip it down for inspection/rebuild as a precaution after seeing the pictures of Marty's board and having the feeling that this "glue" problem was not isolated to his Nikola. My board that showed clear evidence of contamination but no visible damage to the MOSFETs demonstrates that boards assembled this way are not guaranteed to fail within 100 miles or so of ordinary use. This does not necessarily mean that they will be safe or reliable in the long term if this assembly technique was used. Personally I chose not to ride this wheel until I corrected the heat transfer situation but I fully respect that others may judge the risk differently. I truly hope that I was overly cautious and my teardown/rebuild will turn out to have been unnecessary.
  11. 7 points
    @Jason McNeil, no thermal paste when using the thermal conductive pad. When the thermal paste is used where no electrical isolation is required, only the minimal amount is required to fill any air gaps in the irregular surfaces even though they look flat and smooth. One simple way of placing the pad in place with the spacers for the screws is to use a made tool for the task that looks like a 6 pronged comb that goes through the holes of the pc board and the mosfet holes and the pad slid on it and then the comb put into the heatsink holes and then slid down to the board. Then place the screws in place with no need for any glue or paste to hole the pad aligned. And if they really want a easy and fast precision assembly, use an assembly that has 2 rows of 6 to assemble all mosfets at once.
  12. 7 points
    @Jason McNeil thank you for sharing inputs and explaining the situation. I think that is one of the best posts I read in a long time. Yes it doesn't give an answer, but explaining the situation to buy a little time before an action plan is in place is a smart move. Why people buy from AliExpress with the issue popping up in byound me. Having a dealer like Jason to breach the culture differences and taking discussions with manufacturers like he does is simply but nothing less than priceless. Now I am not directly impacted by this issue with the Nikola, but as a community it hurts to see QC, design choices and bugs, coming up again and again. Thank you for the status report.
  13. 7 points
    Tina advised yesterday it's just a couple days delay, we'll see...
  14. 6 points
    This is what I warned about. Component changes need to be validated. Making late charges for perceived minor benefits is risky. In disciplined product development we go through proto, EVT, DVT, and PVT (mini production run) phases, with testing and review at the end of each phase before we can move to the next. Here's a site that explains the methodology: https://blog.bolt.io/the-illustrated-guide-to-product-development-part-4-validation-1b5ab3aeaf35
  15. 5 points
    Hi all, I'm not really sure why I'm making this posting - it's not a wheel review and not a riding lesson either but nevertheless I thought I'd type a few lines of what I think of EUC riding from a beginners perspective. I wasn't really sure why I wanted my first EUC, but somehow after seeing videos on youtube I thought I want one and will attempt to justify the expense later. It just seemed to me they offered a bit of fun, a practical means of getting around, a bit of a challenge learning a new skill, a little bit of risk that's adds to the fun and the challenge without risking my life and a bit of an excuse to socialise with other local riders. At nearly 60yrs old I'm not a youngster and did wonder if I'd be too old to learn to ride, I'm not yet ready for the knackers yard yet but I'm also not going to win a 100m sprint. I'd already by now talked myself into buying one but wasn't sure what I needed so registering with this forum and asking a few questions seemed to be the way forward, thankfully I got plenty of useful advice so it was time to get the wallet out and treat myself. As an old git a rider of maturing years I couldn't really justify spending £1500 on a hobby I might not even enjoy so I settled on the Inmotion V5F. So, 2 months later and nearly 250 miles what do I think? It's turned out to be a fantastic purchase As I said this isn't a wheel review and people can decide for themselves what they think of the V5F but from personal experience I can say it's been great fun. Neighbours looked at first..... 'look at that 60yr old idiot trying to ride that kids toy' was what I thought they were saying internally. Sure the first few days involved an awful lot of falls (60 yr olds don't learn as easily as 20yr olds) but nothing to get to concerned about. Perseverance says you can do pretty much anything with enough time and enough determination and riding an EUC is no different. What started as a 5ft long ride holding on to a railing soon became a 5yd one without support, that became a 50yd ride in a day or two. After a few days I could reasonably confidently stay on but the wheel decided the destination and steering was something yet to be learned. I opted for a day of hard core training doing nothing but figure 8 turns in a carpark - it was boring but well worth the effort. Suddenly I could control this damn thing - I decided where we are going, not the wheel. I'd say I'd ridden about 100 miles before I could really start to turn tight curves and feel confident that I had control. It's only now in the last few days at 200+ miles that I can reliably get on and off without support but the freedom it gives is incredible If you are new to this game and contemplating buying your first wheel - just do it. I honestly think any able bodied person can learn to ride with a bit of practice. Just like having a magic carpet once you get used to it
  16. 5 points
  17. 5 points
    Has this already been posted? EcoDrift: "Pre-series Kingsong KS-16X. First impressions" (Russian Original) EcoDrift: "Kingsong KS-16X. Disassembling. English version." (Russian Original)
  18. 5 points
    +1. Thermal grease is just used to fill the small irregularities, as the contained air is a great thermal isolator. But still thermal grease, pads, etc are much worse thermal conductors than the metal of the heatsink and the mosfet - so as less as possible should be used. Just enough to fill the air gap. In the case of the EUC heatsinks with all MOSFETs mounted electrical isolation is needed, too. This could be achieved with thin mica or other ceramic plates and a thermal grease layer and _both_ sides. Most probably an assembly "nightmare"! They used thermal pad (should) fullfill both tasks - fill up the air gaps, electricly insulate and still provide sufficient thermal conductivity. Additional application of thermal grease should worsen thermal conductivity?! To optimize the quality one could do a market research for different thermal pads - there is quite a range of different qualities available. (as is true for thermal grease) A second point/thought to improve/ensure thermal conductivity could be using clips instead of screws to mount the mosfets on the heatsink plate: the silicium die, where the heat is generated is more or less in the middle of the mosfet body, assembled on the back metal plate of the mosfet. This point needs the pressure for good contact to the heatsink. (Afaik thermal pads need to be "correctly" compressed to perform as specified in the datasheet). As the screwhole is "far" away from the die there could be a leverage effect bending the body with the die a bit away from the heatsink, especially if too much torque is applied.
  19. 5 points
    @Jason McNeil let me honestly tell you something.. when I started to get curious about euc (6 months ago.. I'm from Italy) your name was like a form of insurance in all sort of post/feedback/web search I made, whenever I've read "Jason" I felt like I was on the right path to know more about euc! then I found this forum and I knew why your name was a sign of guarantee! sorry for this ot but you have to know how important is what you do in the way you do it!
  20. 5 points
    All I've read the past year was how Gotway "used to" have worse build quality and quality control issues leading to higher risk riding them, but how they're supposedly getting better now. Even if you can point to a couple examples of Gotway doing somewhat better on one or two recent wheels like the MSX, overall it looks like the old stereotype still remains true of Gotway as a company as a whole. Meaning every new wheel of theirs should be assumed to fall under the old stereotype unless/until after a couple years if that particular wheel proves to be one to add to the small list of exceptions. If you like analogies: InMotion = Apple = behind on specs but good production values/lots of polish (alternatively: shiny and scratches easy ;-) ), clear (if simple) product lines, (at least North American branch of IM) more accountable than most (like Apple, not immune to hardware fsck-ups, but relatively rarer and they have actually done recalls occasionally when necessary) King Song = Samsung = higher specs, overall solid/rugged hardware construction, some weird quirks people put up with for the higher specs and ruggedness (the King Song whine and poor companion app are sort of the equivalent of some of the janky stuff Samsung has done with their UI skin over the years), sprawling product lines but with at least some order behind it, more accountable than most other Asian hardware manufacturers but not quite all the way/still dealing with an Asian business mentality which can bite you on occasion Gotway = no-name Asian Android OEM's = rush to cram in the highest specs without concern for much else, often shoddy construction, no cohesive product lines or naming conventions, no accountability -- at the end of the day, yes you can get a no-name Asian Android handset with the most cpu cores and/or the highest clock speeds, but you have to be willing to live with a lot of cut corners for it (although at least if such a phone overheats/fails it won't throw you to faceplant on the pavement) Of course in all cases, the two universal truths remain: While we are all relatively early adopters, you at least don't want to be an "earliest" adopter (what I am hereby declaring the "let Marty Backe fall down first" principle ;-p ) Everyone worships ewheels.com and Jason for very good reason, as the only surefire 'insurance'/protection against EUC manufacturer shenanigans. __ (For reference, here is an excellent write-up on the history of wheel issues by the various manufacturers: )
  21. 5 points
    Guess who's about to get a lot more riding time
  22. 4 points
    @Jason McNeil a review of your Kingsong 14D I did with Ben Fox. Hope you like it. Just found out you are also a fellow Brit? 😁🙌🏾
  23. 4 points
    And so the journey continues.
  24. 4 points
    Probably not, but I will still dismantle mine and check as soon as I get to it. The larger TO-247 package has the screw hole in the middle of the Mosfet, which makes the thermal connection a lot more solid against pulling/twisting the Mosfet legs, and overtightening. If glue is found in the MSX as well, this could explain why there haven’t been issues.
  25. 4 points
    I JUST HAD MY AHA MOMENT! Greetings folks, update, it's official I'm a unicyclist....kinda. I've been awful lately trying to learn this thing and nearby at my local running track I had my moment! Made it all the way around and was ecstatic! Long way to go but I'm thrilled, thanks for the videos and the encouragement.....great forum.
  26. 4 points
    Well that wouldn't be a good sign either. In manufacturing it's vital that each operator is trained on, and follows, the Standard Operating Procedure (SOP). This should be a document that provides precise, step by step instructions on how to perform the build. There is no room for interpretation. It's the job of QC to make sure that the SOP is followed. If there's an operator who is deviating from it, they should be taken off the line and retrained. If the QC doesn't catch these things, that a huge red flag too. What else are they missing?
  27. 4 points
    Another point I forgot to mention last night: when the first tear-down photos were posted by EcoDrift, I wrote a list of questions about the Nikola, where the selection of these MOSFETs was at the top of this list. MOSFETs: What type of MOSFETs are used in the Nikola, are they HY brand, what model? Why are they not the TO-247 type found in the MSX? Is there now max current regulation in the firmware? If so, what is this value, 100A max? What sets Gotway apart from other Manufacturers, is that their firmware (as of a year ago) does not perform current regulation—this is why their controllers do not contain fuses. I lobbied pretty hard for the TO247 on the Nikola, but the answer I got was that the Wheel had been extensively tested, that fears of going back to bad old days of controller blowouts were unwarranted... You give me too much credit here. Gotway Engineers are no fools, when contrasted to an organization like Ninebot with their vast resources, Gotway have usually been open to reason, & back up their products. This may be true, we need to commission a test rig for stressing the controllers under various loads in test these principles experimentally. I could be wrong, but I suspect that with a drop of efficient thermal compound on the conductive metal surface, will make an dramatic effect on shuttling away heat. In most applications these components are probably not stressed to anywhere to the same degree with as on a Wheel charging up a hill on a hot day, where the standard insulating pad is adequate. Also a special thanks to @Marty Backe & @Phil McLaughlin for their efforts with this investigation.
  28. 4 points
    A tiny tiny pump track. Scary stuff for me but good practice. I will go back and practice more. Can't ask for a better track to practice on.
  29. 4 points
    I think this is good thread for anyone considering, waiting, or being disappointed at the Z10. If I would’ve bought the Z10 (without trying), my feelings would likely be somewhat similiar. Seeing that others have the same issue, and that it requires learning a new riding style would definitely help. That said, as most top wheels at the market currently, the Z10 does seem to have it’s share of manufacuring issues. Perhaps even more than average.
  30. 4 points
    i bought the nikola lol i couldn't wait.... And I've already had to send mine in and get the board replaced.. I love it tho despite all the issues.. It has the best flow I've felt yet and I've ridden all the new wheels except the v10f.... so i guess i am satisfied with my wheel right now and i suppose it would be different if i was in need of a new one. I have the 16s and the v8 as backups to the nikola. ... but my nikola rides like a dream.. i go up some pretty long steep inclines on my ride home from work and she goes up them with absolutely no problem.. it feels like she's begging for more .. I'm constantly trying to get done with what I'm doing so i can go ride my nikola so i guess i can't really comment on the whole early adopter thing i just don't think id do it again .. Like your videos btw stephen i wish i could get over to the uk to ride with ya . keep on gliding
  31. 4 points
    As of today (Saturday), Gotway has not responded to Jason's queries, to the best of my knowledge. They appear to be playing Deaf, Dumb, and Blind. Jason can elaborate further if he wants, but there has been at least one additional catastrophic board failure that looks like my board (same exploded MOSFETs and glue). Presumably this user was not riding up Overheat-Hill. So this is a real concern folks. Somehow Gotway needs to feel the pressure. I think it's probably safe to ride mellow-like, but if you have one I wouldn't push it. But that's me.
  32. 3 points
    Edit:  there are now "official" statements from Gotway (on Facebook) that acknowledge the problem and that new control boards will be available for all owners of the original Nikola. Owners are supposed to contact the dealer where they bought the wheel. ______________________ Unfortionately GW used something like hot glue inbetween the mosfet and the thermal pad as ?assembly help? for the nikola. Until now two cases are known: If one is interested in the "whole story", it starts here with @Marty Backe's report after disassembly of his nikola after the mosfets burned at the beginning ("baby hill") of overheat hill So if you are one of the happy owners of this, otherwise great wheel - PLEASE DRIVE CAREFUL AND DON'T TAKE IT TO THE MAX, DO NOT OVERLY BURDEN THE NIKOLA (for now). Hopefully there will be soon some official statements from GW with a solution to this problem offered! A "small" point, which also came out in this discussion after the fryed mosfets happened on overheat hill is that the reported current is very often very high (much more 90A current warnings than @Marty Backe normaly gets with his GWs) and a very low reported temperature! So it seems one should not wait for a overtemp alarm to be raised - watch the current (spikes?). Or even better - TAKE TIME TO RELAX AND DRIVE COMFORTABLY UNTIL THIS IS SOLVED! Edit: A great teardown and some thermal distribution test Second Part
  33. 3 points
    EcoDrift: "Pre-series Kingsong KS-16X. First impressions" (Russian Original) EcoDrift: "Kingsong KS-16X. Disassembling. English version." (Russian Original) Posted separately so it doesn't get lost in some long thread
  34. 3 points
    That was a fun ride! Sorry I couldn’t stay with everyone for the whole time, but thank you for putting it together.
  35. 3 points
    Tähän siis vielä aloittelijoille tarkennuksena, että valmistajien ilmoittamat lukemat toteutuvat vain 60kg kuskilla, tasamaalla juoksuvauhtia ajaen, pysähtelemättä, ja ilman ilmanvastusta. Todellinen käyttöetäisyys on karkeasti puolet ilmoitetusta, ja riippuu ajajan painosta ja ajotyylistä. Joten akun Wh kertoo etäisyydestä enemmän kuin tuo valmistajan noppaluku. Mä pääsen MSX:n 1600Wh akulla tavallisesti vain n. 55km, koska painan yli 90kg ja ajan kovaa. Joskus ekat akkupiippaukset (<15%) tulee jo ylämäessä 40km kohdalla.
  36. 3 points
    I'm getting the impression that " The Great ________ Screw-Up of 20__! " will be something that we still have in 2030, from all manufacturers
  37. 3 points
    Be careful, there's the 84V MCM5 everyone loves and there is a 67.2V MCM5 which nothing much is known about here. It surely isn't bad, but it's not the 84V. From earlier wheels, we know the 67.2V will feel ~20% weaker than the 84V. Not at catastrophe, but a notable difference. 170Wh matches the 67.2V. 16s1p 2900mAh. But that battery is uselessly small either way. That's just unsafe, easily overleaned. Buy a real MCM5 for like $900 or something else My opinion. It's tempting, but I wouldn't do it. In the end, you just spent money on something you won't be very happy with. For the money, you might find a nice used 14D e.g. Or you just spend more.
  38. 3 points
    Once my MSX arrives (hopefully working) we’re now day-trip ready! She’s fully confident on the V5F now - and surprisingly the dog loves the new backpack!
  39. 3 points
    At this stage I don't believe there have been any reports of this issue with the latest Tesla board. The board used for the Tesla V2, was already an upgraded board that actually began getting installed in the Tesla V1 quite some time ago and was distinguished by a change to the "ringlight" pattern options (sadly losing the brake light option) so it has been around for a decent period of time now. However, as mentioned elsewhere and possibly of some concern, the construction method is the same as the Nikola having one row of hidden mosfets along the centre of the board (so who knows whether the hot glue assembly method may be a factor here too!)
  40. 3 points
    The scene here reminds me of Liberty Island , NY, or Washington Square in DC.
  41. 3 points
    oh my god wtf is with these euc manufacturers... rip summer 2019 lol, why the hell couldnt they have just gone with the tried and true 2000 watt motor as if thats not enough power for anyone especially on a 16" wheel just had to go and change it last minute lol
  42. 3 points
    Tomorrow (6-23-2019) ... 50,000 expected https://www.google.com/amp/s/boston.cbslocal.com/2019/06/19/encore-boston-harbor-everett-casino-opening/amp/
  43. 3 points
    Wow! That would be a big blow for Kingsong given that Gotway basically gave them a ton of potential sales with the Nikola debacle.
  44. 3 points
    Ecodrift seems to have confirmed that the KS16x production may have been suspended as a result of motor problems.. bad news for Kingsong.. if it is true.. can someone confirm? i believe ecodrift should be releasing a video on their YouTube channel. Subscribe if you haven’t already.
  45. 3 points
    Again I ask (rhetorically) why does every step forward include a step backward, from these EUC manufacturers? Suddenly their workers can't assemble control boards!!?? This is beyond ridiculous? There is absolutely no consistent manufacturing methodology in these factories. I blame the management. I hear Gotway is owned by an engineer. Some engineer!
  46. 3 points
    I Just bought a 2000$ nikola from @Jason McNeil at Ewheels.com and only got 60 miles on it before the board died... i emailed him while on the side of the road and called an uber.. he called me within two minutes. thats customer service like i've never heard of. He had my wheel 100% repaired and back to me in 9 days!!!!!!! If that security and convenience isn't worth a cpl hundred dollars(not to mention you get your wheel in 2-4 days instead of 4-6 weeks) then I don't know what could be better!!!! Thank you so much Jason you went above and beyond, and i will never buy a wheel from anywhere but from jason at Ewheels !!
  47. 2 points
    Ok ok now I have to see this... 🙄 So I took a look at it. I think this guy sadly one of those I refer to as me-culture. I doubt anyone would be able to talk some sense into him. Yes fair enough he is unhappy with the wheel, but like others already what do you expect and how did you get those expectations? That he bought a heavy wheel should not come as a surprise really. This is specified. That he is directed back to point of safe should not come as a surprise either. To my knowledge this is how law say the legal obligation is in most countries. Complains about headlight, well like most other wheels it eacy to have an extra light with you. A building light will only be able to do so much. Anyone riding evening or night time knows this. Especially if you do it in poor street light that interfer with your eyes adjusting to night vision. As for language goes, I would not post a review where only thing that makes sense are swear words. I would make it in native language and the write translation instead. It didn't take long before I had to mute him. Like others pointed out, he calling himself a professional is nothing short of hilarious. Ahh well let's move on.
  48. 2 points
    Isn't it exciting @Lucas Alexander Oliver that your wheel was pivotal in understand the Great Hot-Glue Screw-up of 2019? Something you can tell your grand kids
  49. 2 points
    If you were more familiar with electronics, you would understand that this is not a ”whoopsey, missed that because we rushed a bit”. This is someone who’s unaware of how Mosfet cooling works, deciding how the GW electronics are built. Being rushed, or any other excuse in the world, doesn’t begin to explain what GW has done. Car companies don’t leave out seatbelts to get the product out faster. Air That is incorrect. Properly designed and properly built, the smaller Mosfets would’ve been fine. They should be able to handle the currents being used. But if they are not attached to a cooling plate, even bigger Mosfets than on the MSX would not survive. You are jumping to conclusions. The size of the Mosfets used in the Nikola are not a known problem. There have been many high performance wheels on the market with smaller Mosfets without issues. There are ZERO wheels (or any other product) with hot-glued Mosfets of any size in the market without issues.
  50. 2 points
    As the guy who placed the first order for an 84V Nikola from @Jason McNeil and was riding one from the first batch, I was concerned when @Marty Backe reported the burnout of his control board. After seeing the pictures I parked the wheel until I could find the time to tear it down and inspect the control board (good to have other wheels to ride ). A long career in electronics design and manufacturing made me suspect that this was an assembly "innovation" not a one-off quality slip. Before disassembly my Nikola was riding flawlessly showing no signs of a problem. (By the way this wheel is WONDERFUL!) I had only put about 90 miles on the wheel before parking it. My rides were local rides on paved roads with rolling hills and max speeds of about 26 mph (42 kph). So... not much stress on this wheel. I have attached a picture of my control board that shows glue residue on the MOSFETs but no apparent thermal damage to the board or MOSFETs. As previously commented in this thread the presence of a substance that is a very efficient thermal INSULATOR on the MOSFET heat transfer surface is a big problem. I will be rebuilding the wheel on Monday after correcting the defect and bringing the thermal management up to what I consider an acceptable level. I will post a video of the rebuild for anyone interested in a DIY solution. So far when anyone has looked they found glue. Just another data point...
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