Jump to content
Evils

Plantar Fasciitis common amongst EUC riders?

Recommended Posts

For the one and a half years I have been riding my EUCs on a daily basis, varying distances but almost always at least 25-30 minutes per day.

6 Months ago I started to get some pain in my right foot that was exemplary for plantar fasciitis (inflamed tissue in the back heel). I tried lots of things to get rid of the issue but not much seemed to help, until I was forced to stop riding my EUCs for a longer period (about 4 weeks now) and suddenly the plantar fasciitis got better, a lot better. 

One of these days though, I would like to get back on to my EUC again, but I'm scared that the plantar fasciitis will come back as I'm assuming this was a result of riding my EUC in first place.

Therefore I'm wondering, is this a common issue long term riders get when riding the EUC too much? Is this maybe a result of me having my feet weirdly on the pedals? 

Just FYI, I'm riding a InMotion V8 and a Ninebot One - although I don't believe this to be very relevant.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Rider's know that as the "V8 feet Syndrome".... ;-)

 

Ok, joke's byside....i have never heard of something like that. Perhaps your feet are quite sensible?

I would guess on some Jobs  you Need to stand much longer than 25-30 minutes still a day, and then These workers would all have this illness.

Hope you'll get better soon!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You can do heel drops occasionally and often while on the EUC. Basically just drop your heels onto the pedals so your full weight is born entirely by your heels. These are the Gold Standard for eliminating Achilles Tendenosis which you should also check if you have.

Plantar Fasciitis and AT are closely related.

I've heard of a few EUC riders that had FP and/or AT, and said that riding an EUC eliminated such diseases. I'm guessing they do a whole lot of hard braking and hence heel drops, and so thereby eliminated their FP and AT.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would truly concentrate on your riding shoes before continuing riding. I use low height, quite rigid motorcycle boots that can fit three comfortable insoles per boot, the middle one having a strong contour that I've found to work well for my feet. Before I found a good combination, the pain in my feet was sometimes overwhelming enough to stop my trips after just 10 minutes. It wasn't Plantar Fasciitis though, the pain was at the outer side of the foot halfway front to back.

I also have built extensions to the original pedals, which also helps to spread the pressure and to ride more relaxed.

Another thing is the foot position. Before guidance I suspect most people put their feet too far back forcing the weight to be mostly at the ball of foot. A good starting point is to match the rear end of your shoe to the rear edge of the pedals.

  • Upvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm very surprised at the difference my footwear makes to my riding comfort and foot strain.  When I wear regular running shoes when I'm going to the gym, my feet will start to hurt within ten minutes of being on the wheel.  When I wear my usual riding boots with a harder sole, I can ride for much longer periods without experiencing foot fatigue. 

I suspect your footwear will be part of whatever solution you come up to the PF problem. 

  • Upvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, mezzanine said:

I'm very surprised at the difference my footwear makes to my riding comfort and foot strain.  When I wear regular running shoes when I'm going to the gym, my feet will start to hurt within ten minutes of being on the wheel.  When I wear my usual riding boots with a harder sole, I can ride for much longer periods without experiencing foot fatigue. 

I suspect your footwear will be part of whatever solution you come up to the PF problem. 

This has been my experience also, with sneakers, it becomes painful relatively fast, with hiking boots (and proper foot positioning) it feels almost if I could go on forever... But even with hiking boots, if I have bad foot position, I have to stop sooner or later. I usually do adjust my feet a bit here and there during rides though.

It seems the season is pretty much over here. The temperature hit freezing point tonight.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, esaj said:

This has been my experience also, with sneakers, it becomes painful relatively fast, with hiking boots (and proper foot positioning) it feels almost if I could go on forever... But even with hiking boots, if I have bad foot position, I have to stop sooner or later. I usually do adjust my feet a bit here and there during rides though.

It seems the season is pretty much over here. The temperature hit freezing point tonight.

Good point about foot position.  That's something I've only gained insight into today, ironically.  I was experiencing fatigue and moved forward on the pedals and found it made a difference because I didn't need to make the same effort to accelerate. 

  • Upvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Stretch your Achilles tendon daily and take an anti-inflammatory such as ibuprofen. Hopefully it will help!

912be603f1d2be221f195c2e2e075487

 

 

  • Like 1
  • Upvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Apparantly the body overdoes the inflamatory response even after the problemis over. The best solutionis rest. when the pain is gone, moderate use, but find a longer term solution. like maybe shoes (i call bs on that unles they take load off your tendon somehow. ) or riding shorter trips by riding faster.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
17 hours ago, Evils said:

For the one and a half years I have been riding my EUCs on a daily basis, varying distances but almost always at least 25-30 minutes per day.

6 Months ago I started to get some pain in my right foot that was exemplary for plantar fasciitis (inflamed tissue in the back heel). I tried lots of things to get rid of the issue but not much seemed to help, until I was forced to stop riding my EUCs for a longer period (about 4 weeks now) and suddenly the plantar fasciitis got better, a lot better. 

One of these days though, I would like to get back on to my EUC again, but I'm scared that the plantar fasciitis will come back as I'm assuming this was a result of riding my EUC in first place.

Therefore I'm wondering, is this a common issue long term riders get when riding the EUC too much? Is this maybe a result of me having my feet weirdly on the pedals? 

Just FYI, I'm riding a InMotion V8 and a Ninebot One - although I don't believe this to be very relevant.

I tend to think that it’s a function of age..

I have known many (including myself) that have gone thru that.. seems to happen in the mid thirties - mid forties (varies person to person) but it seems to go away over time. I hope it does for you as well. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've had this a few times for a day or two after long, strenuous, no-break rides (usually in colder than normal weather). Aka pushing it too hard, too much compared to normal.

Just step off regularly if this is a problem (same as for the feet getting "flat" at the end of a long ride) so you changed your foot position, and don't force yourself to stay on the wheel for longer than it is comfortable. I suspect a long, unchanged foot position is the kind of stressor that can cause this. So simply step off, walk a few steps, and go on with a changed foot position.

Of course, if you're already inflamed, take a break from riding until it's gone, you don't want to accidentally make it chronic.

Other than that, I guess like with everything else, you can ease your body into the new EUC related stresses, just don't push it too fast and don't ignore if you're uncomfortable or something even hurts.

  • Upvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Another parameter to play with is the forward/backward ANGLE of the foot rests which is readily available through the Inmotion app. For me on my V8 I actually found the best setting to be a slight forward tilt. And reiterating what has been said above:

- Shoes: My supremely comfortable and light-weight sneakers with thick soft soles are profoundly uncomfortable to ride with. Hard soles are the best.

- Foot stance: forward/backward placement of course but don't overlook the toe-in/toe-out parameter. In the beginning I was experiencing some discomfort by riding with my feet strictly parallel to the wheel but twisting my toes slightly outwards by an inch or so really did wonders for me. The strain on your tendons will be in a more natural direction when you bend your legs.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/20/2017 at 10:08 PM, Rehab1 said:

Stretch your Achilles tendon daily and take an anti-inflammatory such as ibuprofen. Hopefully it will help!

912be603f1d2be221f195c2e2e075487

 

 

i’ve had it bad myself, not from euc, but doing these stretches first thing in the morning and before going to bed and it’s ususally gone in a few days.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/21/2017 at 2:08 AM, GoinPostal said:

I tend to think that it’s a function of age..

I have known many (including myself) that have gone thru that.. seems to happen in the mid thirties - mid forties (varies person to person) but it seems to go away over time. I hope it does for you as well. 

I've read online about it being an issue of age and so my doctor told me as well ...

The only issue I have with that is that I'm only 26, moderately fit and it seemed to be directly related to riding an EUC (especially the V8).

 

I've been riding today for about 1hr for the first time after taking a 4week long break. I wore a new pair of GEOX shoes that are normally great for walking long distances and such things, yet, my feet felt numb after 20-25mins on the wheel so I stepped off every now and then. I'll test another pair this upcoming week, thinking about my shoes, I actually switch to a pair of New Balance from my nice boots a little before this issue appeared the first time (suspicious ...).

I'll go back to my exercises soon and report back in a bit! 

Thanks to everybody who took the time to answer!

  • Upvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had another thread here about this. For me, the EUC is helping. 

Also, rolling your leg muscle with a foam cylinder is good. It seems to loosen the leg muscles down to the feet.

Seems like foot position may be the issue for you, or shoe issue. I can highly recommend a good gell insert.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/20/2017 at 10:08 PM, Rehab1 said:

Stretch your Achilles tendon daily and take an anti-inflammatory such as ibuprofen. Hopefully it will help!

912be603f1d2be221f195c2e2e075487

 

 

Or grounded flax seeds if you prefer a natural anti-inflammatory.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


×