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New IPS i5 announcement - some interesting innovations

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meepmeepmayer    2,415

Very interesting!

Not sure why so many manufacturers go for the light and slim route (see Uniwheel), whereas the bigger and stronger wheels seem to sell like crazy as soon as they are released.

But the suitcase-like design starting to emerge here is very interesting, towards "office looking", "professional", "business", maybe even flight-compatible light commute wheels.

Is the board in the box, or where else is it?

Does it not have a retractable handle?

Edited by meepmeepmayer
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Rehab1    5,984

Cute! So where is the padding? I see this funky little shaped red pill in the area where your ankles would sit ( probably for the pedals) but zero padding for the calves. With the narrow shell profile and no padding my knees would be banging into each other when performing sharp turns or navigating any bumpy terrain.

As @meepmeepmayer alluded to the design has a professional looking, expensive, aesthetic, business like appearance. It has Trump written all over it!:P

 

Edited by Rehab1
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steve454    2,229
4 hours ago, Tilmann said:

Dear @rayna903, please correct me where I'm wrong. My sources for this post are https://www.facebook.com/1593003297614828/videos/1875867519328403 and http://www.iamips.com/product/showproduct.php?lang=cn&id=31.

 

Apparently, IPS is about to release a new EUC called "i5", available in two models using either the common 18650 or the slightly larger 20700 batteries.

-1--IPS-self-balancing-electric-unicycle---Startseite-4.thumb.png.7a053dc837a8b64597d4989e958fd6e1.png-1--IPS-self-balancing-electric-unicycle---Startseite-3.thumb.png.2aafd0a097b4124e8ede573aac0d0313.png-1--IPS-self-balancing-electric-unicycle---Startseite-2.thumb.png.e45e4199f88711913bd9fbe53d74eb80.png-1--IPS-self-balancing-electric-unicycle---Startseite-1.thumb.png.207e01987aa305f83d2d358c728c54bd.pngWindow.thumb.png.dea56ee52b3ab4f16e7ff0fead8de281.png

It seems to be a "last mile" solution for lighter users with 350W rated /1000W max. motor power and just one pack of batteries (16S1P). While that sounds like very ordinary entry level, the shell design is uniquely flat and apparently made from some magnesium-alloy, which takes all the structural forces while keeping the total weight below 8Kg. Batteries appear to be Panasonic 20700B with 4250mAh. 

While it is certainly not a performance beast in any dimension, I think it's quite an interesting approach for the light & casual user. I am very curious for feedback from everyday users on how the new shell holds up and whether those 20700B batteries might be an option for higher performance wheels, too. 

Very cool, very thin, looks like a Kingsong 18 with the tall sides.  Shows that IPS is still in the market.  The bigger batteries seem to get quite a bit more range at the same top speed.

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10 minutes ago, Hunka Hunka Burning Love said:

Doesn't it look a little like a skinny, black gas container or the FIAT 500?

It could be worse... it could look like a Roomba! 

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Rehab1    5,984
39 minutes ago, Hunka Hunka Burning Love said:

Plus I wonder by getting rid of the aluminum pedal supports whether the case would be strong enough to avoid bowing inwards?

There is definitely a rigid pedal support but I can't see how much it is reinforced. Alloys can be strong if there are adequate stringers especially behind the pedal mount.

 

Edited by Rehab1
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Vik's    755
8 hours ago, meepmeepmayer said:

 

Is the board in the box, or where else is it?

Does it not have a retractable handle?

Controller board placed inside the motor as usual with IPS.

And no trolley as it weigths only 7,5kg... trolley would just add an unnecessary dead weight.

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Vik's    755
1 hour ago, Hunka Hunka Burning Love said:

OMG that thing is so fugly.  :barf:  Instead of IPS in that logo...

it could be Leica logo :) I think they got inspiration from camera giant

Leica-Q_teaser-307x205.png

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Trey Lewis    278

Oops didn't even notice your sources. Pretty clear it was official IPS news. Ignore that first comment!

 

I do want to express concern for people that are always tempted to ride on one leg. If you put most of the load towards your ankle I imagine you would be okay, but for riders who ride with their weight resting higher on their leg I would be concerned about eventual damage. I trust that they have to tested it quite a bit, but American riders tend to be a bit larger. I can already se a pedal snapping as it doesn't look nearly as well attached as more conventional wheels. With that being said it could be a non-issue entirely and I am hoping to be impressed!

 

Pro: Extremely easy shape to wrap.

Edited by Trey Lewis

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Dingfelder    885
18 hours ago, meepmeepmayer said:

Very interesting!

Not sure why so many manufacturers go for the light and slim route (see Uniwheel), whereas the bigger and stronger wheels seem to sell like crazy as soon as they are released.

But the suitcase-like design starting to emerge here is very interesting, towards "office looking", "professional", "business", maybe even flight-compatible light commute wheels.

Is the board in the box, or where else is it?

Does it not have a retractable handle?

Might be easier for people to buy a smaller cheaper wheel for their kids' Christmas and birthdays presents?  Especially if it's their first one?  

The bigger ones can be so expensive by comparison ...

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Dingfelder    885
1 hour ago, Chris Westland said:

IPS is going for the slim, light end of the market, with the idea that EUC's could be a real urban commuter.  It puts the i5 in the same category as the Zero ...< 7.5kg (vs. Zeros 10.3kg), slim, 14", 20kph.   Owning a Zero, I am enthused about the potential for short commutes on even ground; paved bicycle trails work well, and top speed is adequate for commutes.    The Zero's motor is rated at 1000W, but performs more like 500W, so I think they may be quoting a peak power rating.

There are two reasons (IMHO) that the larger wheels tend to be popular: (1) stability on rough, unpaved ground; and (2) 30+kph speeds which becomes your baseline once you've gotten into EUCs.  The IPS controllers are well designed, and it would be great if their engineers could scale up this light, slim technology into something to compete with the Gotway ACM.

I would put ability to carry larger riders right up there, if not in the lead.  Lots of Americans are big.  Even teenagers in America can be pretty big. 

At a bit under 6'2", I used to tower over most people, and be looking down at the top of their heads when walking.  Not anymore. Not for decades now.  

If anything, I think EUC's are largely behind the curve when it comes to American body sizes.

Edited by Dingfelder
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Adel    61

Do these companies have anyone on their staffs that understand design esthetics ?

 

Edited by Adel

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Dingfelder    885

Looks like a briefcase to me.  Not bad, but very businesslike.  More plain and serviceable looking than attractive.

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kasenutty    647

I think it looks fine. I'm not gonna get one, so I'm not going to piss my pants all day about it. 

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meepmeepmayer    2,415
2 hours ago, Dingfelder said:

Might be easier for people to buy a smaller cheaper wheel for their kids' Christmas and birthdays presents?  Especially if it's their first one?  

The bigger ones can be so expensive by comparison ...

I meant that it's strange that some companies only build lighter wheels and seemingly (at least to me) refuse to consider stronger wheels. e.g. Gotway builds the Luffy, but Inmotion does not have a >1000W, >1000Wh wheel even though that would be a sure hit.

And even the cheap brand wheels are kind of expensive as birthday gifts;)

13 hours ago, Vik's said:

Controller board placed inside the motor as usual with IPS.

And no trolley as it weigths only 7,5kg... trolley would just add an unnecessary dead weight.

Thanks, didn't know IPS always did this, that is very cool technically (though maybe not practically if you have to do repairs).

I think a trolley handle is a must for business/"need to take this to my desk" style wheels. From this place, I'm getting the impression it is a sought after feature right behind battery/motor/speed.

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nute    120

The board is not in the motor on the LHOTZ, its in one side of the shell, battery in the other side.  The main board, the lighting controller and the buzzer board are all separate, and all housed in the shell beside one another. 

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Trey Lewis    278

Also, if you visit their website they do have another larger model that still says to be announced or whatever. It is clearly bigger and will likely be much more exciting (I would be excited about the i5 but at 6'6 I am likely to heavy for it.)

While the i5 won't maintain the 2499.00元 price (As listed at iamips.com) due to the expensive cost of importing I am sure it will be a very strong competitor at the lower end for those who don't need the range or speed.

wheel.PNG

Edited by Trey Lewis
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Chris Westland    618
10 hours ago, Dingfelder said:

I would put ability to carry larger riders right up there, if not in the lead.  Lots of Americans are big.  Even teenagers in America can be pretty big. 

At a bit under 6'2", I used to tower over most people, and be looking down at the top of their heads when walking.  Not anymore. Not for decades now.  

If anything, I think EUC's are largely behind the curve when it comes to American body sizes.

I didn't think about this as I am 5'7" and about 150 lbs (perhaps a product of spending 1/4 of my year eating Chinese food) which puts me in the range of Chinese engineers.   In that regard, I think the Zero would be problematic for a 6'+  & 200+lbs rider as torque may be insufficient to stabilize such riders reliably.   All the more reason for IPS, with its innovative designs and high quality, to come up with an ACM challenger.   I think maybe their model could be the Inmotion V5/V8 which are light and relatively powerful.

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Flavour    41

The wheel is interesting. I think (and hope) it looks better in the real life, because the casing is from metal instead of plastic. This is just great, I would love to see it and test it. Much better idea than the famous plastic of other manufacturers, which comes already scratched out of the box.

 

14 hours ago, Jason McNeil said:

At 6cm the i5 might be too thin. V5F is double the width, but we get occasional complaints that it's too thin for some people.

What a BS. How could a wheel be too thin? When I tested my friend's Zero I loved there are no pads, because... I don't ride with my knees pressing the pads. I don't know any experienced rider who does that. Doing this makes you tired a lot faster. The muscles should be relaxed and in natural, straight position. Thinner unicycle means no contact with the casing.

It's actually more natural - more like walking. You don't bend your legs.

In contrast, when riding on KS16, I couldn't avoid pressing the pads - it's so wide. The V8 I now have is so uncomfortable with the hard, plastic pads, than I keep my legs widely - they even stand out of the pedals, which is uncomfortable and not so safe.

With the IPS I5 I assume these issues doesn't exist and the ride doesn't make you tired at all. I like what they achieved.

 

Pads are good only for waiting for a green light and for beginners, because they're scared and pressing the pads make them feel safer.

7.5 kg is awesome, you shouldn't feel this at all if you've got used to heavier wheels.

 

Regarding the shape - I think they wanted to make it similar to a laptop - rectangular, thin, great to carry in a backpack.

 

What I don't understand is the differences in the specification. The specs you posted here are from unofficial IPS dealer websites, they are known for making them up. Everyone says other things about the spec: https://www.electricunicycles.eu/ips_i5_and_s5_the_new_electric_unicycles_from_ips-c__253

I've heard the rated power is 500 W. 

So, waiting for the official and confirmed spec with rated power and max power output!

 

If you want a big, fat wheel and go crazy like Jason with his Gotway - the I5 probably is not for you. If you want a real essence of mobility, the lightest wheel which you can put into a backpack (which is super useful as no one knows what you have in your backpack), with built in lights - the I5 sounds interesting. The maximum speed is not that bad comparing to Ninebot One E+, which is more than enough for most people. Besides, the spec isn't official, so maybe the max speed is higher, and the 20 km/h is the stable, crusing speed or something.

I would prefer unicycles going in the direction IPS is going, than riding a Gotway Monster, which is a complete opposite to what an EUC should be.

 

What I like the most is IPS is challenging the market. If you can do 7.5 kg with that spec, what's next? 5 kg and more speed and range? There has to be someone like this on the market to pressure other manufactures. It's not so hard to make a fast EUC with huge range, which weights 20 kg. 20 kg??????? WTF. Good luck with that.

 

I hope the build quality will also be good. For instance, why do you need a fast wheel like Gotway, when their quality is just poor? Gotways look more like prototypes than actual wheels. You have a big battery and powerful motor, but you are scared if the casing is solid enough.

Edited by Bat
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