10 posts in this topic

Posted (edited)

Greetings.
Topic: Possibilities for salvage/fix old EUC beyond warranty, used outside specifications (frequently beyond max load and driven in rain, snow/frost, mud, offroad). 

Abstract: Used my Esway Mars Rover ES-E3 daily for over 3 years for transport to and from school, for buying food and joyriding/exploring. 35-45% of those days I rode until battery was empty. Went up and down very steep hills with incline 10-25 degrees paved and gravel. Usually at or above max load capacity. Some days I packed my schoolbooks and skis and rode up a bumpy mountain road that didnt have asfalt so I could study up on the mountain and ride my skis back home. Of course this use has taxed every system of the EUC beyond capacity. Now my beloved transport system suddenly stops when I do a maneuver that requires high power such as rapid acceleration up a steep hill, making very sharp turn at high speed/accelerating or carrying a load near/above max capacity).  Sudden and complete shutdown of all systems (which might very well be my fault for tampering with every single part of the system)

Maintenance: Once a month: Complete disassembly. Inspection, measurements of components and replacement or repair of any component outside specified tolerance. Cleaning and resealing all electronics. On first inspection replaced all wires subjected to stress and high current with extra heavy duty insulated wires soldered in and secured with added deadlength to absorb stress and vibration between solid anchors (metalclamps or heavyduty strips). Cleaning drivebolt/nuts with rubbing alcohol, re-applying threadlock and tighten with torquewrench. Simple loadtest of battery (measure voltage when fully charged, then observe the drop in voltage when applying load). Tirepressure and drivebearings check (low tirepressure makes the motor work harder and decreases battery life. Drivebearings checked after re-applying threadlock and tightening to specified torque using torquewrench (no powertools) by securing the kajigger between your knees or in a vice with thick rubber inlays by the drivebolt when disassembled. Jiggle wheel in caster and camber angle to feel for loose bearing. If jiggling creates movement on an otherwise secures drivebolt the tolerance of the bearing can be checked with a micrometer and be replaced. These bearings are very cheap at most machine shops (around 2USD) and the partnumber is printed on the seal of the bearing.)
Each following month complete disassembly, visual inspection, cleaning and checking torque on drivebolt and how much the battery voltage drops when putting a load on it.
Note: These batteries might seem good when only subjected to slight load. The benchload test using something like lightbulbs is therefor useful for the inspection process of wires, electronics and battery connection. Accelerating sharply in a hill, turning aggressively with the wheel in a very sharp angle or similiar does put a load on your battery because of high poweroutput, but you shouldn't use this method to check if your battery handles load. Retailers selling motorcycle batteries will have the equipment to test your battery if you experience lacking performance.
 
**Note: Warranty void since complete disassembly for cleaning, re-application of thread-lock to drivetrain, batterycheck, re-securing wires and troubleshooting electronics.**.

My initial point to this thread was to get a solution to my specific problem with my specific model (discontinued Esway ES-E3).  The wheel just stops when I ride aggressively and requires a reset which is done by plugging in the charger.
EDIT: loadtest both bench and proper load while riding seems fine. Dang these segment batteries coupled in parallell are hard to troubleshoot.

Further discussions or ideas here could be similar problems with other EUC and general re-purposing/salvage/overhaul projects.

Edited by Cryptonitor
EDIT: Added my tweaks and routines for optimal longevity and durability.
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Does the shut down probability depend on the battery level?

My initial guess is, the batteries are "spent" and will quickly drop to lower voltage, and the wheel takes this as a clue to shut down.

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No relation with battery level. It can happen when fully  charged or nearly depleted. I suspect it has something to do with the fact that the motor has been run at or above max capacity for years and simply overheats because of degrading of motor windings which causes higher resistance with all the resulting bad things from that. I've ridden for quite a while recently without shutdown. I don't think it's the batteries since they perform well in bench-test. I'm studying engineering. I checked every component individually and they are all fine.

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I'm no expert by any means, maybe you just need a new wheel then if it's just general wear and tear that's happening;)

3 years is pretty good for a noname clone, that's wonderful news for people wondering about longevity of their brand wheels!

 

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I'm not familiar with that wheel, but with @noisycarlos 's Ninebot a similar thing was happening.  It ended up being a cell or two not charging up to spec any more.  I wonder if you can test each cell to see what voltage they are at individually.  He took his pack all apart and measured each individually IIRC.  If you have a spot welder, you might be able to replace the dying cells.  If the pack is getting old it might be wise to replace the whole thing.

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Hehe I think this was a lucky purchase. Incredible durability. I have taken it completely apart, cleaned everything, done repairs and maintained it a bunch of times because I rode it all year here in the arctic. Everything gets worn from the ice and slush. WOW Hunka Hunka that is brilliant! I tested each and every component but not the individual cells of the battery! If some cells in there are bad it will be cheap and quick to fix. Stresstest, loadtest and visual check on battery was all good but as you say the charging brings a heavier load than just a homemade testbench. Hoped it would be something more interesting so we could cooperate on salvage and DIY. If changing the battery works I might engage in hacking scrap to create open-source replacement parts/upgrades for any EUC if there is interest/need

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Posted (edited)

Let me enable you further... :innocent1:

Just gonna throw this classic thread into the mix for good measure:  :whistling:

 

Edited by Hunka Hunka Burning Love
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Posted (edited)

Aaaah so much goodness xD If the battery is being replaced it has to be AGM(absorbent glass mat. So the battery does not loose function just because some cells are splintered) in makeup and preferably consisting of several indivudual cells with kinetic chargers inbetween to make it charge itself when moving

Edited by Cryptonitor
explanation why AGM
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that is many years of charging.Can you guess hoe many time you have charged the unit? 

I am sure your batteries have reach their end of life.  they only take so many cycles.

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Probably 1000-1200 charges. Rode for 30 minutes and still had a bar left yesterday. No steep hills though.

EDIT: maintain-charging has probably increased the max charge/discharge. If my wheel is not used I still plug in the charger regularly to maintain cellvoltage. Some cells always discharge alittle in storage and that makes a voltage difference that the charger cannot compensate for, if left unnatended.

Edited by Cryptonitor
Added note on downtime charging
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