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Hunka Hunka Burning Love

Classic Black and White Movies and Oldies

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Anyone into old black and white movies?  I recently watched "The Apartment" with Jack Lemmon and Shirley MacLaine.  Charlize Theron had mentioned on the Oscars that movie made quite an impression on her.  It was quite good!

Another good one to see is "A Patch of Blue" with Sidney Poitier and Elizabeth Hartman.  I watched it way back as a kid, and it still is a classic movie.

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Young Frankenstein is a black and white classic, even though it was purposely made in B&W to look older.  "What Knockers!  "Why, thank you doctor!"

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I had a chance to watch "Some Like It Hot" with Jack Lemmon, Tony Curtis, and Marilyn Monroe a few nights ago.  It was overall a pretty good movie with some funny comedic elements.  Marilyn has a surprisingly :blink: revealing dress in that movie for the time that still arouses the senses with today's standards.

I saw "Roman Holiday" with Audrey Hepburn last night, and it was an entertaining  adventure through Rome.  If you haven't seen it, try to catch a viewing.  Maybe a little old fashioned and simple by today's standards, but it's a classic nonetheless. It's interesting how much feeling an actress can express in just a brief moment through her eyes...

Although not a black and white movie, I saw "Breakfast at Tiffany's" as well, and I found it a little difficult to keep interested in plus the dialogue was slightly convoluted I found at some points.  Not a favorite for me.

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I watched "Bringing Up Baby" starring Cary Grant and Katherine Hepburn last night.  It's a slapstick comedy that apparently was only mildly successful in the day, but more recently it was considered one of the 100 greatest American films of all time.  I thought the film was pretty good with some funny antics at a golf course and dining area earlier on.  Katherine Hepburn was sure a looker back then.  :whistling:  Cary Grant's acting was a little inconsistent at times as the bumbling paleontologist, and Hepburn's character seemed a little too rambling and crazy at some points.  I don't know if I'd call it a good movie, but it was entertaining for the most part.

I must be on a B/W viewing spree as I saw "Sabrina" shortly after.  It stars Audrey Hepburn (no relation to Katherine), William Holden, and Humphrey Bogart.  This is the classic movie about a young woman falling for the wrong guy.  Hepburn was quite good in the lead role, but I think the age difference made things a little difficult to accept as well as Bogart's stoic acting.  There just didn't seem to be that chemistry onscreen somehow.

Caught the finale of the Walking Dead - ugh.. disappointing and a yawner.  :sleep1:  Faithfully watching all the episodes of the season only to be left with this?  It was so predictable.  :rolleyes:

Somewhere in there I also saw "The Seven Year Itch" with Marilyn Monroe and Tom Ewell.  It started off promising and interesting with funny dream sequences of the lead character's fantasies, but the inner conflicts and erratic behavior left me wondering if he was a little on the psycho creepy side.  :wacko:  Marilyn was her usual dreamy voiced self with the bubble-headed personality.  Sort of a forgettable movie.  I don't even remember what happened at the end...

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I had a chance to catch a late night viewing of "From Here to Eternity," with Burt Lancaster, Deborah Kerr, Montgomery Clift, and a skinny Frank Sinatra!  Montgomery is like a dead ringer for a young Tom Cruise.  Set at the Schofield barracks on Oahu right before the Pearl Harbour bombing, it entwines the stories of a young army soldier (Clift) who refuses to box for his Captain's league and the second in command who has a dalliance with the Captain's wife.

The famous beach kissing scene is an iconic image from American cinema.  It seemed shorter than I expected though, and the change in feeling shortly after seemed like an odd contrast which spoiled the previous scene for me.  I found the movie engaging for the most part and Clift's character interesting to a degree.  Lancaster's interest in the Captain's wife is a puzzler from the get go for such a well regarded soldier.   The ending I thought was bitterly ironic, but I'm no film studies major so maybe it was fitting and summed up the whole theme of rebel versus army?

 

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I viewed the black and white 1949 comedy "My Friend Irma" starring Dean Martin, Jerry Lewis, Marie Wilson, and Diana Lynn.  I believe it was a radio show before they made it into motion picture.   The humour actually holds up pretty well even today.  It's interesting to see Martin and Lewis paired up in their early days.  If you enjoy mildly campy humour it's worth a watch.  Whoa and did I forget to mention how gorgeous the two lead actresses were?  :wub:   Hubba hubba!  :dribble:

As well I caught "La Vie En Rose" with subtitles which dramatizes and chronicles Edith Piaf's tortured life and rise to stardom and eventual decline.  Although not a black and white or oldie, it was an interesting trip through the challenges that Piaf went through during childhood and revealed her passion for her art through song.  Poignant yet defiant at points, you really get a good sense of who Piaf was as a child growing up, a reknown French performer, as well as a lover and friend.

Oh how could I forget to mention that I watched "Blue Hawaii" with Elvis Presley and Joan Blackman a few nights ago.  Although it's a popular Elvis movie with some famous songs, the story was pretty lacking and seemed pretty much just an excuse for Elvis to show off his acting chops while touring through Hawaii.  It was neat though to see Hanauma Bay way back when...

Next up will be "Casablanca" and the "King and I" I think...

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1 hour ago, Hunka Hunka Burning Love said:

Oh how could I forget to mention that I watched "Blue Hawaii" with Elvis Presley and Joan Blackman a few nights ago.  Although it's a popular Elvis movie with some famous songs, the story was pretty lacking and seemed pretty much just an excuse for Elvis to show off his acting chops while touring through Hawaii.  

You moved to technicolor! I was getting worried :cry2: 

Being Abbott and Costello are proudly hanging on my :popcorn:wall I watched some of their movies last week. I loved Abbott and Costello meet Frankenstein! Funny! :laughbounce2:

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The River of No Return.  Marilyn Monroe's best movie.  And, it was shot in Alberta.  Most memorable scenes, where she fell off the raft, and the lead male actor gave her a leg massage to get the blood flowing, and when these two bad guys tried to take advantage and got put on foot and their rifles and horses taken  by the guy whose was trying to protect his son and the dance hall girl he was with.  Then at the end, he realized she was the one for him and vice versa.:thumbup:

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left out an n in taken
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Posted (edited)

I used to love watching Abbott and Costello reruns as a kid!  :roflmao: Jerry Lewis and Dean Martin were a great duo as well.

Just watching "River of No Return" right now... scenery looks very familiar... have to watch "Niagara" later on...

I caught "The King and I" with Yul Brynner and Deborah Kerr over the weekend.  It was quite the production in terms of set and costume design.  The show within a show of Uncle Tom's cabin was mesmerizing to watch.  I thought it was pretty good overall, but the ending seemed a little out of place.

It was a weekend with Deborah Kerr so "An Affair to Remember" with Cary Grant was next on the list.  It's the classic movie referenced in "Sleepless in Seattle" as the ultimate chick flick movie.  It started off pretty good, but it seemed to drag excessively at some points of the film.  I almost fell asleep while they were visiting the grandmother... if you are patient it does pick up right near the ending and is well worth the watch.

I also had the opportunity to view "Casablanca" for the first time.  Somehow it never really interested me over the years, but since it's highly regarded as a classic I had to give it a go, and I'm glad that I finally did.  Humphrey Bogart's portrayal of an emotionally scorned and bitter man is well played out, and his feelings for Ingrid Bergman are both tangible and painfully evident.  

EDIT:  Marilyn Monroe was pretty hot in "The River of No Return," plus it was interesting to see that she sang all of her own songs.  Robert Mitchum was his usual tough guy self.  There was one ackward scene where Mitchum literally jumps Monroe's bones in the forest which by today's standards (and maybe back then) crossed some boundaries.  The "massage/warming" scene was definitely interesting.  :whistling:  Overall it was a pretty basic cookie cutter western with not many surprises.  I did recognize where they filmed the scene where the raft goes over some rapids.  It's a short drive from Banff Springs Hotel.

Here's some photos.  They go over this drop:

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And float towards this bend in the river to the left.  There's a small beach at the corner where they launch rafts.

c0f75e0fd0.jpg

Back view at the Banff Springs Hotel

c0f775dd6d.jpg

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Posted (edited)

Watched "Singin' In the Rain" yesterday, and it was a great show with wonderful performances from Gene Kelly and Danny Kaye.  Debbie Reynolds looked so young in that film at age 19, and her resemblance to her daughter, Carrie Fisher, was quite noticeable!  Apparently Kelly was suffering from a terrible 100 degree fever when he performed the famous dancing in the rain scene.  Kaye's physical comedy still holds up today and was quite amazing.

 

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Just finished watching Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers in "Top Hat."  It's the movie where he sings "Dancing Cheek to Cheek."  I've never seen a Fred Astaire movie before, and this one was a great one to start off with.  It's a light comedy/romance, and the dance scenes are simple astounding.  Astaire had some amazing dance moves, and Rogers did a superb job matching his steps.  This one's definitely a good watch just to see Astaire's cheeky quips, amazing footwork and delightful mannerisms.

Edit: I had to watch this classic a second time as it was such a great movie...

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Got a chance to catch "Swing Time" with Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers a few days ago.  It's about a man who misses his wedding and runs into another woman who he falls for instead.  The story seemed to be a little insensitive to the fact that Astaire had a fiance waiting in the wings for him, but it was hard to deny the chemistry between the two leading characters.

The four dance routines are considered the best ever performed on film by some people.  Unfortunately the ending falls a bit short with what appeared to be a strangely over the top scene which could have been done better I thought.  It's still worth a watch if you get a chance.  I'm not a big fan of dance, but it is just mesmerizing to see how well Rogers and Astaire move with one another and how light they appear on their feet.

 

 

 

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Got to see "Gentlemen Prefer Blondes" on Netflix (Roman Holiday is on Netflix as well) tonight.  It stars Marilyn Monroe and Jane Russell as two friends travelling on a cruiseship who get into some trouble when Monroe flirts with a rich man.  

The famous song "Diamonds are a girl's best friend" is performed in this movie.  Overall it was just okay.  Monroe is her usual vacuous self while Russell plays the more in tune with reality best friend.  The guy playing the PI had no chemistry and character to him making Russell's interest feel pretty forced.  Monroe shines during her Diamonds performance, and she steals most of the scenes with her captivating beauty.

 

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Viewed "Notorious" with Cary Grant and Ingrid Bergman tonight.  It's a 1946 movie set in Brasil about the daughter of a Nazi party member who helps American agents reveal Nazi members continuing their work in South America.  Directed by Alfred Hitchcock, it definitely had a much darker theme than the other films I've been watching.  Bergman shines as the troubled woman of ill-repute, and Grant provides the steely love interest who is conflicted by his affections for Bergman.

While a little slow in places, the story weaves it's way to an uncertain ending.  Although there was a lot of smooching ah romantic exchanges, Cary didn't seem to have much onscreen chemistry with his counterpart early on.  He does have a scene where his eyes convey his true emotions though which was well acted.  Worth a watch, but it wasn't a favorite.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Notorious_(1946_film)

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i'm loving this assembled video

 

and TOKYO BOOGIE WOOGIE 1947 too

with his humoristic  2013 

 

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I had a chance to watch "Royal Wedding" with Fred Astaire and Jane Powell as two stage siblings who each find love outside of their profession when they visit England.  This movie has a couple of classic moments, one involving Astaire jumping onto a wall and dancing on the ceiling of a hotel room.  For a 1951 movie now in the public domain it was done quite well as they must have had the entire room rotate on a support of some sort.  Quite amazing and well done for the time.  The story was a little lacking for me, but overall for the two famous scenes it was worth the watch.

 

In addition I watched "Funny Face" with an older Fred Astaire starring opposite a 28 year old Audrey Hepburn.  The 30 year age difference was a bit of a stretch to fully accept their romance as real, but I read that it was a dream for Hepburn to be able to get a chance to dance with Astaire on film.  Hepburn was her usual charming and lovely if slightly aloof self whose character seemed overly focused on the (ficticious) study of Empathicalism.  Paris serves as the backdrop for some very good moments.  I haven't seen too many old movies that actually filmed on locations abroad.

Astaire has an impressive dance scene where he works with an umbrella and a trench coat.  The song and music weren't that memorable for me, but the talent shines through nonetheless.

Lastly I caught "To Catch a Thief" with Cary Grant and Grace Kelly.  Filmed on location in Cannes and the French Riveria, it is an Alfred Hitchcock classic that follows Grant as "The Cat," an infamous jewelry thief who is suffering from his notoriety amongst his peers and the authorities when several robberies take place. Grace Kelly is stunning in this movie, but her chemistry with Grant seems lacking.  Maybe it is just the large apparent age difference that makes their relationship difficult to find tangible.  I found it a bit of a sleeper.

To-Catch-A-Thief-Grace-Kelly-and-Cary-Gr

 

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