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Douglas Ingram

Inmotion V3 twin wheel

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That one is always that price.  I always wanted to try out a dual-tire wheel.  This is probably the best feature/value of this type - but yeah, it isn't entry level price.  It isn't on the higher end price range either, though.  You could always look for a dual tire generic maybe for $400-$500 and it will be only a little more than your $300 training wheel.  That would be a dual-tire trainer model.

Ya that's what I'm looking for.  All in all the generic wheel I bought first isn't bad at all.  210wH battery, fancy lights, built in head light, blue tooth with an app and a fob remote.  Build quality not bad.  My son and I have been rough on it learning and it is still going.   The down side is I'm fat and it only had a 350 w motor.  and of course not having any info on it,  no one to talk to about it.  The sale person (Vicky) told me what the buttons on the fob does. and said some thing like " don't press D it messes with the unit."   It most likely has riding modes, but no way of finding out.  Sorry rattled there a bit

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Ya that's what I'm looking for.  All in all the generic wheel I bought first isn't bad at all.  210wH battery, fancy lights, built in head light, blue tooth with an app and a fob remote.  Build quality not bad.  My son and I have been rough on it learning and it is still going.   The down side is I'm fat and it only had a 350 w motor.  and of course not having any info on it,  no one to talk to about it.  The sale person (Vicky) told me what the buttons on the fob does. and said some thing like " don't press D it messes with the unit."   It most likely has riding modes, but no way of finding out.  Sorry rattled there a bit

@Colestien You can try to find the Inmotion V3C version which has the same specs as the V3 Pro minus the Bluetooth Speakers and Rear Light(it has a rear reflector instead). I got mine for 640 SGD (460 USD) from a distributor here in Singapore.

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There is now a newer version..the V3s model. The major, if not only difference between V3 Pro is an upgraded battery from 144w to 288w (I'm told this may be the new standard battery). This brings an increase of distance to (up to) 40km. This model unit, I must say, is a really nice ride. And although many people may consider this type (2 wheeler) as an entry level unit, I'm trying my hand at advanved maneuvers. I say "roll on!".

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The V3S has double the number of batteries over the V3Pro & V3C, & therefore in principle, double the power as well. 

Inmotion_v4.jpg

 

 

Edited by Jason McNeil

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On Sunday, February 07, 2016 at 9:28 AM, Coffee guy said:

There is now a newer version..the V3s model. The major, if not only difference between V3 Pro is an upgraded battery from 144w to 288w (I'm told this may be the new standard battery). This brings an increase of distance to (up to) 40km. This model unit, I must say, is a really nice ride. And although many people may consider this type (2 wheeler) as an entry level unit, I'm trying my hand at advanved maneuvers. I say "roll on!".

OK who are you? My Q3 has a 340 wh battery and only go 15 km! And it doesn't have lights and bt speakers, STOP SPAMMING

Edited by MetricUSA

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Metric USA, I don't know why you presume me a spammer, honestly? I read the details from my specs, and I am as passionate an euc person as I'm sure "you" are.

I await your apology.

<_<

 

 

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image.thumb.png.06b897257ef4cce51c22c282image.thumb.png.d74906046b58660211c0053d@Jason McNeil ummm, No. V3S motor is the as V3pro. It does not mean more power. Just means you can ride longer distance.

@Coffee guy Its really a well made unit. When I visited Inmotion's head quarters in Shenzhen back in October I got to test out the V3pro. Easier for a Newbie to learn. But also harder to turn. They are really well made yet they are pricey for what you get. If you got the money and want a really well made EUC that easier to learn on, then get it. The only draw backs are the limited speed. The V3S makes the fun last longer. I see it as a good to learn on wheel but once mastering it you will want to buy a single wheel. And you will have to somewhat relearn due to the one wheel vs what you will be used to, the two wheel. 

 

Edited by NevNutz

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@NevNutz You're correct.  I was only singing the praises of the quality of the V3s. Even now I imagine the one-wheel options out there that I may upgrade to (KingSong, Soloheel, Ninebot to name a few). I do feel lucky to have taken the dive to euc's with a well made product though.

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1 hour ago, NevNutz said:

No. V3S motor is the as V3pro. It does not mean more power. Just means you can ride longer distance.

With Wheels, motor power is nearly almost always a question of the batteries being able to supply enough sustained juice, the V3S has two sets (parallel) of twenty cells (20s2p). Try going up a steepish hill with the V3S vs. V3Pro & the difference will be dramatically illustrated...  

This graph is not from the V3S but shows why battery pack power is necessary for safety.

Regen_on_9B1.thumb.png.09611d75ac30249fa

Edited by Jason McNeil

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On Thursday, February 11, 2016 at 11:09 AM, Coffee guy said:

Metric USA, I don't know why you presume me a spammer, honestly? I read the details from my specs, and I am as passionate an euc person as I'm sure "you" are.

I await your apology. Bf

<_<

 

 

You wouldn't... Unless you weigh in at 000 kg...

Edited by MetricUSA
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Well I bought one of the cheaper V3C type as my first EUC. Basically the 144Wh battery, no speakers or switching lights, and slightly cheaper shell. I got it for approx $425, so it was a bargain. A twin wheel is rather handy in the shop or on the bus, as the thing stands pretty solidly by itself.

It IS simple to learn getting up, riding straight, getting off, slow turning etcetera. After that I kind of hit a wall in the learning curve.

I noticed four things that annoy me to a greater or lesser degree:

  1. On a leaning curb/sidewalk/path, you have to let the thing lean with the slope enough to get both wheels on the ground. With one wheel you barely notice small sideways slopes, but on this you either find the angle or you'll find yourself with one wheel off the ground and turning rather quickly. Parrying cracks, dips and manhole-covers becomes rather "interesting" when you simultaneously are trying to keep the correct angle to the ground. Sudden changes to the slope can also be rather unnerving, as the whole thing leans hard on one leg, then swerves and flips to the other.
  2. Going over rough cobblestones or other patterned roads is fascinating, as the "lift" from the bumps comes way off-center, trying to tilt the thing either right or left with quite some force. You can do it if you keep the knees loose and "float" the rocking motion. But the "chatter" is unbelievable and it gets old pretty fast.
  3. Every single stone, crack, dip, rope, manhole cover acts as an off-center lever unless you manage to hit them both wheels simultaneously. The wheels are 3" apart, which means it acts almost like very hard flat surface 4" tyre. It is not very relaxing, but with time you learn to compensate.
  4. Turning tightly means going up on one wheel, which of course is a matter of practice, but still off-center and takes some force. My feeling so far is that the smoothness of turning suffers: not pushing hard means very slow turning, while pushing hard means very quick turning. The change feels rather abrupt, rather than a smooth "flow"

All in all it is not the wheels I would use going off-road. Neither on uneven roads, streets or pavement. It can of course be done, but the relaxation factor suffers. It is like having a totally square hard and very wide tyre on a rather smallish wheel. For going slow it's brilliant. For taking to the shop it's outstanding. Going about town on good surfaces is cool, but I'm already thinking about what to replace it with.

My actual needs are typical "last mile" needs. But stretches of the roads I have to take are pure sh*t, so this twin wheeler is becoming a bit tiring.

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Interesting review Scatcat, thanks for posting it. That wheel is intriguing looking. 

Hopefully you will learn a lot on this wheel while you have it, making the next one easier.  

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Yeah Dingfelder, I get the feeling that if I can master this one on uneven roads, the next one will be a dream...

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