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Found 8 results

  1. My fall...

    So this happened a while ago, but for some reason didn't feel like posting about it (or even posting at all for that matter). But yesterday started reading up on the tesla and other crashes, so i thought i'd 'contribute'. It ended up being a fairly big wall of text, so i've put a tl;dr at the end. This happened back in september on a warm but windy day. Had the Gotway ACM for a couple of months and started to feel - maybe to- confident. The weather was nice and felt like accelerating but had a fairly strong headwind so might have over leaned a bit. The tiltback was set at 35km/h (used to be at 30 but got annoying to be tilted back all the time) and instead of slowly being tilted back (probably because of accelerating?) the tiltback was sudden which in turn caused me to lose my balance. Because i lost my balance i fell/flew forward and first landed om my right hand and slid a bit, then on the right side of my head and slid some more followed by either shoulder,elbow, wrist or pelvis on te left side and somewhere along the way i might have turned my head (atleast i recall seeing both sides...) and saw my wheel come to a standstill against a big sturdy flowerpot. Managed to get up go to my wheel, then couple minutes of trying to find my balance (probably cause i banged my head) inspected for injuries. Luckily i was wearing elbow, knee and wrist guards but unfortunately it was summer so just a tshirt and shorts. Because of shorts and sliding my knee protection didn't help much (just slid upwards) nor did the elbow guards (might have caught the first hit, but have roadrash). My shoulder didn't look to good though and the wound on side was fairly deep . So managed to get back on the wheel somehow and to make an even longer story short spend a night in the hospital with a heartmonitor and the following night under family supervision because the crash caused a small crack in my skull... But that wasn't it... I also had backpain and at first they thought just a strained muscle. Didn't improve in the following month or so, so went back for x-rays which didn't show anything, so advisement was fysiotherapy which changed the diagnosis to a touched nerve and another month later I still wasn't convinced it improved so they changed diagnosis to either a moved disc or something equally bad. So the suggestion was to first try an osteopath before an MRI. She concluded a locked rib and some other stuff (probably unrelated to the accident, but earlier surgery). These sessions actually felt like they made a difference and in february i was finally able to consider it at least healing... So pictures! Three pictures of injuries (as far as i was able to take them, elbow not included), one of the maybe overkill bandage they put on the arm and two of the effects on the gear. What i was wearing at the time was knee and elbow from G-Form and wrist guards from Flexmeter and just a standard bicycle/skateboard helmet. I don't want to think on how my skull or wrist for that matter would have looked and i'm pretty sure i'd have spend time in the ICU unit instead of a regular bed for a night. I think i used the wheel again november (had to wait a month for the cracked skull to heal) since then I replaced the helmet with a Kali Interceptor (for some reason i still don't feel like wearing full facial) and bought a kevlar hoodie with protective pads in elbow,shoulder and back (but don't use the latter). Kevlar because it lightweight and is supposed to protect in case of sliding. The wheel still works fine but disabled the tiltback cause i don't trust it anymore but all the other alarms are still active. tl;dr: Fell due to sudden tiltback (and inexperience maybe). Injuries limited because of wrist guard and helmet but overall road rash on knee, thumb, elbow, shoulder, pelvis. Small crack in skull and 'locked' ribs. Wheel survived and got back on after about a month or two but with a small protection gear upgrade.
  2. Cutoff, but why?

    So I was headed home afterwork and took a detour to grab a drink before I got home. Luckily from work to home is only a 10 min ride max. Why is that luckily? At night I ride in the road because it's not as unridable as the sidewalk (ironically) plus at around 11 at night, not many people are on the road. Well there was a car coming up behind me so I usually ride into the shoulder till they pass, but there was a fairly large puddle (it was raining still) I barely saw and ended up riding through. About a minute later, I got the tiltback warning (which I assume was me reaching top speed like always, yes I need a faster wheel, haha), began to slow down and recover cruising when the wheel performed an action like it was confused adjusting to normal riding then giving me a tiltback feeling very rapidly within 3-4 seconds before it cut off and I safely ran off it. I was devistated afterwards when I picked up my wheel to find it wasn't turning on. I had just replaced a tire after procrastininating for weeks so it felt like i was wheel less again. After walking about 10 minutes back to my house, I sat it next to a heater for a few minutes than thought to try charging it and lo and behold it powered up once I plugged it to the wall. Battery level was the same and everthing works like before. Weird experience. Thought it's worth sharing.
  3. A buddy of mine has been riding his Ninebot Mini Pro daily for more than a year and he always complained about how slow and annoying because of the alarm and tiltback. Recently, he switched to EUC. He bought a BNIB Ninebot One E+ with NO modification at all. After learning and riding it for about a month later, out of curiosity I asked him whether he likes it or not, since I know that a Ninebot One E+ normally is not fast enough for regular cruising. But I was surprised when he didn't have any complain about its speed at all besides of the battery capacity, of course. Not even complained about any alarm / tiltback. At first, I didn't believe him. But when he showed me this... should I worry about him having a defective unit or happy for him for having the fastest Ninebot One E+ on earth?
  4. Tilt-back is a mechanism to incentivise the rider to slow down. The mechanism is simple: the neutral inclination angle of the shell and hence the pedals is changed from horizontal to negative, tilting the pedals back This gives the rider the incentive to initiate a slow down (see also below). Here I discuss my understanding of the energetic (and a few other) consequences of tilt-back. Remember the feeling to lose the ground under your feet when the tilt-back sets in? Here is why. Simple geometric consideration reveals that if the riders feet stay in contact with the pedals, tilt-back raises the riders front feet and lowers the riders heels. Lowering ones heels feels like losing support and means that the riders body lowers as well if the heels remain grounded. The effect from the centre of mass: most of the work to raise the riders body (or the toes ) is done by muscles, hence the energy comes from the food the rider has digested. (Lifting 102kg by 1cm loss-free needs about 10W=102*9.81*0.01W for one second or 100W for 0.1s thereby adding 2.78mWh=10/60^2Wh=0.0024kcal to the potential energy of the rider). However not only the rider needs to work: when the wheel pushes the rider forward (or backward), straightening up or raising the riders body adds momentarily to the riders perceived weight and hence to the power demand of the wheel. Vice versa, bending the knees or lowering the body gives the wheel a short period of decreased power demand (perceived decreased rider weight). Lowering by 5cm would remove the entire rider weight for 1/10 of a second. This is definitely something one should exploit in any critical situation: the reflex of bending the knees to keep or restore the wheel under the rider is a life saver! I had two or three quite surprising saves from intentionally going rapidly-almost-falling-like deep into the knees. Unfortunately, going deep into the knees is particularly difficult and somewhat physically limited under tilt-back. Yet, soft knees are our suspension. Soft knees get us over bumps and out of potholes. Bending knees is THE invaluable reflex when riding an EUC. But I digress... First summary: when tilt-back sets in, the riders heels lower and (without body posture change) the riders centre of mass lowers and this leads to a small but possibly notable power demand reduction. The effect from the change of tilt angle (here I stand corrected): because changing the tilt angle backwards increases the speed of the motor traveling relative to the shell, changing the angle requires energy. The amount however seems to be rather miniscule. If we travel 20km/h=5.6m/s with an 18" EUC and change the tilt angle from 0º to -10º in 1 second (pretty scary, IMHO), the shell position changes over the wheel circumference by 4cm = 10/360 * 18" * π. Hence, the circumferential rotation speed increases for 1 second by 0.72% = 0.04m/5.6m, i.e. by less than one percent. I am actually not sure what the power demand of this mechanism is (between 0 and 1.4% seems a good guess), but to all I can tell it must be negligible. Tilting the wheel also lowers its centre of mass. Lowering 20kg by 1cm in 1s may deliver 2W for 1s at most. Second summary: all in all, I do not dare to decide whether the effect from titling the wheel saves or demands a very small amount of energy. For the remainder, the simple but conclusive approach is to considered energy conservation: any consumed energy from the battery must be converted into kinetic energy or potential energy or heat. After the tilt angle has changed, from the energy balance perspective nothing is different to the situation before. If the wheel consumes additional energy, it produces more torque. More torque leads to acceleration (hence energy is converted to and conserved as kinetic energy), just as it happens without tilt-back or while the tilt-back sets in. Some people feel that under tilt-back they seem to apply more pressure to the front foot, or equivalently, that the wheel applies more up-pressure. This means that the wheel produces more torque to provide this counter pressure. Torque however invariably leads to acceleration of the wheel (or the wheel and the rider). The other way around, if the wheel does not accelerate, this feeling is a perception due to the uncomfortable foot position but not actually an increased up-pressure. Finally, slowing down the wheel, with or without tilt-back, can be accomplished by initially accelerating the wheel to the front of the rider. Tilt-back is the invitation to do exactly this. In particular, if the rider does not adapt to the changing neutral tilt angle, the wheel accelerates (without the rider and quickly). This acceleration requires some additional power (less than the acceleration of wheel and rider). With the knee-bending trick applied immediately, the additional power to initiate braking can at higher speeds probably be reduced to zero.
  5. I was watching a video of a rider on a Ninebot One E+ experiencing tiltback while having low battery. As there are many Ninebot One riders here on the forum I thought I would post my style of riding on low battery (less than 5 miles range (red zone) left on the battery) and experiencing tilt back cues from the EUC. The Ninebot One E+ responds positively if the rider accepts the tilt back cue in the following way upon receiving a low battery- excessive speed (range = 5 miles and less on the app) tilt back cue from the bot: 1-assume a mild transition to a braking position with the feet tending to push forward (legs perpendicular to the tilt back angle) 2-as the bot slows the pedals return to the horizontal 3-repeat steps 1 and 2 as additional modest speed induced tilt back cues are issued from the bot Note: the riding speed becomes very slow as compared to green zone battery ranges of 7 to 17 miles but the recovery to a horizontal pedal position allows for an easy balanced ride upon a moving NineBot One. Going several miles is very possible on low battery. Keep it slow. Trying to zip across a road at a crosswalk will produce a tilt back if you try to go to fast. When the bot won't go any further it will audibly and continuously beep to tell you the battery has no more range left.. The circular rings on the Ninebot display turn red in the lower section when stopped at low battery. A quick glance at the LEDs (ex at night when the ring color is most visible) will tell you without the app that your battery is getting really low (< 5 miles of range). Let the Ninebot One E+ be the boss when it comes to attainable speed limits on low battery.
  6. My E+ decided to punish me today

    TL;DR: Don't believe the range reporter, don't start a trip when the battery drops below 50%, and try not to push over 12 mph. Today, I decided to do a 4.5 mile ride on 50% battery. It was over flat road and the distance estimator said 9 miles, so I figure I was OK. It was smooth sailing for the first 3 miles. I ride pretty fast and my NB beeps at me to slow down, which I do, but after 3 miles the unit was down to about 25% battery and it I started getting a lot of beeps and tiltback way more extreme than the normal tiltback I get when I break 12mph. It got so bad at one point that I almost had to stop. I tried putting the speed limiter on, but it didn't really help. I basically had to limp home at about 3-6 mph. At home, the battery was around 10%. When I checked, the unit temp was 120F, which I guess is pretty hot. Ambient temp was 60F. I'm 6'2", and weigh ~230 lbs with all my gear and backpack, which is getting up there, so I think this is what I get by pushing the unit a too hard. So the big lesson is that the 9B range is probably half what is advertised for a person my size. -e
  7. Basic help for new Ninebot rider

    Hi- I recently acquired my first EU, a Ninebot One C+. I am eager to learn to ride as we have a few days of good weather right now. I'm making progress but every time I go a few yards, the wheel tilts back and I feel I've got to jump off and let it go careening into the grass. I thought if I lean back the wheel should slow down and the tilt back should update. But I don't seem to be able to do that. What am I doing wrong? I have the speed limit set very low because I am a risk-averse person. Is that my problem? The battery says it's at about 69%, so I don't think that can be the problem. I think the firmware is at 1.2.2 or something like that; I don't think it's the dreaded one that kills the wheel. Any advice would be greatly appreciated! Oh, and by the way, I have the somatosensory setting at 3, which is how it shipped to me. Should I take that up or down?
  8. My kingsong tilts back upon overheating quite often, sometimes after riding for 10- 20 minutes. Is this a good safety feature or a design flaw - inability to shed heat effectively ? Or..i am I just too freaking fat? ( i am 100kg) which causes the wheel to overheat much faster. The wheel is supposed to be rated for 120kg though. i dont have data on how other wheels react to overheating. Opinions welcome.