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Found 9 results

  1. Wanton and furious driving

    I have been following a UK court case relating to the extremely sad and tragic death of a pedestrian who died as a result of being hit by a cycle that was not road legal (In the UK bikes have to have a front brake which the cyclist's bike did not have although these "Fixie" bikes are quite common in London). The reason for my interest is that the cyclist was prosecuted under a very old (1861) offence of causing GBH by "wanton and furious driving". This offence appears to be used when it is not possible to prosecute under modern road traffic laws; apparently, it was originally created to deter people from driving horse carriages recklessly. I am not sure if it could ever be applicable to EUCs, although its use (and the use of the 1835 Highways Act) does suggest that modern laws need to be written in the UK to reflect current and future modes of transport. It's a really tragic case and my heart goes out to the family of the pedestrian who was killed. http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-london-41034492 http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-41036581
  2. http://vancouversun.com/news/local-news/vancouver-mans-first-ride-on-electric-skateboard-ends-with-600-ticket Same motorcycle cop as harassed me busted this poor guy on a V2 Boosted Board on his way to work. Handed him a $600 fine. Shop that sold it takes NO responsibility for not warning him. How is it NOT entrapment to allow the sale, (with no warning) of a $2,200 item which is then illegal the second he walks out of the store? I have written the author of the piece and sent it to the local sellers, and I emailed LongBoarder labs (who sold it to the victim) to ask if they are going to help us change the law, or just take the money (diplomatically though of course!) and continue to ignore their customers paying a heavy price due to not knowing. Vancouver - Home of the combustion engine and jack-booted law to keep it that way! Don't believe the "green" crap, it's all lies in this city. I'll be next, eventually this cop WILL see me again
  3. So we kinda knew this already but I saw this article today and thought it wouldn't be long before the issue of these was addressed 'officially' no surprise at the boring no-fun-allowed response we get here in the UK. Thoughts? http://www.digitalspy.co.uk/tech/news/a673228/its-illegal-to-ride-hoverboards-in-public-police-crack-down-on-segway-spin-offs.html#~pqTOZHKGM5i3ZC http://www.cps.gov.uk/legal/p_to_r/road_traffic_offences/#dot
  4. Absolutely gutted :*(

    I was just out for a ride to the seawall, got a few blocks and a motorcycle cop pulls me over while going from a road to a park. He asks me how long I have been riding the wheel, I tell him a month or more. He says that in Vancouver, it is illegal to ride these EUCs anywhere in the city. No sidewalks, bike trails, bike lanes, nothing. He says he could give me a $530 fine for riding it in Vancouver if he sees me again! He says they are classified as motor vehicles and cannot be insured either. I just spent $1400 cdn on this wheel, it's my commute to work, and my absolute favorite thing in the world and the cop says i will be fined $530 (which I cannot afford) if he sees it again! $#@%!!!! So now I am faced with not riding a brand new wheel, or facing an unpayable fine if I do. If you live in Vancouver or BC, or just give a damn for some reason, please email the Mayor's office, it's easy! http://vancouver.ca/your-government/contact-mayor-robertson.aspx 604-873-7621 Media relations mayor.media@vancouver.ca Address Gregor Robertson, Mayor 3rd Floor, City Hall 453 West 12th Ave Vancouver, BC V5Y 1V4 I have not felt so absolutely devastated in a long time, I LOVE gliding my wheel! /Seppuku
  5. Is there an EUC Lobby Group in the UK

    Does anyone know if there a group that is actively lobbying for electric unicycles to be recognised as a legal form of transportation in the UK? If not, would anyone be potentially interested in participating in a group set up for this purpose? I know there is a petition on the UK parliament website, but realistically just getting people to sign a petition isn't going to change anything (especially if it's not huge numbers of people). I really believe that electric unicycles can be a viable form of personal transportation and that they have a number of distinct benefits over other forms of transportation. As with all forms of transportation, EUCs have some limitations which need to be considered and mitigated. It would be useful to construct a list of people, groups and government agencies/departments who should be lobbied, together with some high quality materials to facilitate lobbying (E.g. case studies for use, environmental impacts and how any potential risks could be mitigated). It may also be beneficial to try to improve public perception of EUCs, including highlighting the differences between EUCs from "hoverboards" which appear to be where a lot of the negative perception relating to EUCs appear to originate. In London there are very active/noisy cycling lobby groups, and it may be possible to learn from these groups on how to best lobby the relevant stakeholders?
  6. Perhaps we can start a listing the Laws and Legislations for EUC riding at their home town.... -This looks like a reasonable one for EUC riders in NSW Australia. Wearing protective equipment should be a must anyways for their own safety. Although my question is can an EUC for commuting be count as "recreational"? Skateboards, foot scooters and rollerblades Listen The law A pedestrian includes "a person in or on a wheeled recreational device or wheeled toy". This includes rollerblades, a skateboard, scooter, unicycle or similar wheeled device: Foot scooters, skateboards and rollerblades may be ridden on footpaths unless signs specifically prohibit them, however, riders must keep to the left and give way to other pedestrians Powered foot scooters cannot be registered and can only be used on private land On separated bicycle and pedestrian paths, foot scooter, skateboard and rollerblade riders must use the section designated for bicycles, but must keep out of the path of any bicycle Foot scooters, skateboards and rollerblades can only be used on the road during daylight hours They cannot be used on roads with a dividing line or median strip or a speed limit greater than 50km/h, or a one-way road with more than one marked lane Safety advice On the footpath, riders of foot scooters, skateboards or rollerblades should not threaten pedestrians, especially the elderly – they may need to slow down or dismount in busy areas To improve safety and enjoyment, foot scooters, skateboards and rollerblades are best ridden in recreational areas designated for their use Foot scooter, skateboard and rollerblade riders should wear helmets and protective gear such as knee and elbow pads The use of foot scooters, skateboards and rollerblades on the road is not recommended for school-aged or younger children
  7. Als begeisterte Fahrer eines elektrischen Einrads habt ihr Euch vermutlich schon mal Gedanken um die rechtliche Situation in Deutschland Gedanken gemacht. Fakt ist (leider), dass alles, was per Motor betrieben wird als KFZ gesehen wird. Und wenn dieses KFZ zudem schneller als 6 km/h fährt, benötigt es ein Nummernschild. Dies ist die vereinfachte Variante. Da ich seit einiger Zeit mit dem E-Longboard eine ähnliche Situation habe (das Gerät fährt 38 km/h) und mit Team Blau bereits einige Katz & Maus-Spielchen hatte (die Jungs tun nur ihren exekutieven Job und können ja nix für die veraltete Gesetzgebung) möchte ich gerne mein Wissen teilen. Das Problem besteht im Grunde ja darin, dass der Gesetzgeber eine Pflichtversicherung vorschreibt, die Versicherungen diese aber (noch) nicht anbieten. Im Gesetz steht jedoch auch, dass eine Versicherung euch einen Versicherungsschutz für ein KFZ gewähren muss (Kontrahierungszwang, https://de.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kontrahierungszwang) sprich, wenn ihr ein Fahrzeug habt, welches als KFZ deklariert wird, muss euch die Versicherung auch einen entsprechenden Versicherungsschutz anbieten (siehe auch § 5, Absatz 4, http://www.gesetze-im-internet.de/pflvg/BJNR102130965.html). Die meisten Versicherungen werden versuchen sich aus dieser Pflicht zu stehlen indem sie erwähnen, dass dieses KFZ keine Zulassung hat - jedoch ist dies so nicht vom Gesetzgeber vorgesehen und damit keine Ausrede. Wir hoffen ja alle, dass ab 2016 auch elektrische Einräder europaweit zugelassen werden, bis dahin hilft hoffentlich folgender Artikel: http://www.elektro-skateboard.de/forum/szene-talk-63/rechtliche-auseinandersetzung-1396.php Tipp: Schreibt an eine Versicherung, per Post, ohne Angabe von Telefonnummer oder E-Mail und bittet um eine KFZ-Versicherung für euer Einrad. Bewahrt das Ablehnungsschreiben in jeden Fall auf!
  8. Hi everyone, We have all read in the media today that UK is clamping down on self balancing devices! Lets try to put a stop to this and show our unity on this matter. Let's try to change the law...!!! l have came a across this petition set up by Steve Miltion. If it gets over 80,000 signatures it will be discussed on the House of Commons! Let's start signing! Please let's spread the word on social media and get the numbers we need! Let's do it for EUC! Thank you for your support #UKridesEUC ---------------------- Allow the usage of self-balancing scooters on public footways and cycle lanes Electric transporters can reduce the number of buses and cars on the streets. Due to the Section 72 of Highway Act 1835, on 12th of October Crown Prosecution Service released a guidance under which the usage of hoverboards and electric unicycles on the public streets would be illegal. Electric unicycles and hoverboards are safe and emission-free transportation devices that have gained popularity in the UK and worldwide since 2012. The devices are portable, they do not require any parking space, and also have restricted speed. Normal riding speed does not exceed running speed. There is a UK manufacturer producing high-quality, stable and safe electric transporters. This company created jobs for over 50 people and represents a significant innovation in transport industry. Click this link to sign the petition: https://petition.parliament.uk/signatures/3689753/verify/jFFUC1F5dv6kEngpgz
  9. Or can I legally ride my wheelbarrow on the pavement? In short, no, a pedestrian controlled vehicle should be controlled from the footway or road, however, there is no stipulation under law as to which limb you use to control the barrow. You are legally entitled to take your barrow form once place of use, to another, and to port goods between places with said barrow. Sorry did I say wheelbarrow? As we all know (Ignorance is no defense under UK law), a scooter requires a vehicle license, a wheelbarrow does not, of course its a wheelbarrow, its only got one wheel and its clearly designed to take a payload (albeit two small equally weighed ones). So for those of you who want to know more here's the legal deal... This depends strongly on local law. Traditionally this area of transport legislation has been neglected, avoided and generally told to go away by most western governments. The general rule is if it has a motor and some wheels and a seat, it is a vehicle and requires a vehicle licence and may require an operators licence (ie: a driving licence). As these are vehicles and require licencing they need to be tested and test departments say they have no criteria to test against so they cant issue certificates, ie: no vehicle licence and so no using on public roads. However as these vehicle not only persist, but multiply, the resistance shown toward Sir Clive's SX5 and the original Segways by governments has been chipped away at over the last decade. Several US states now permit their use without licence, as do several European countries and Israel, though an operators licence may still be required. European legislation is due to make these vehicles legal across the EU, but this has not happened yet (Jan 2016), and when it does, there will still be plenty of maneuvering room for local legislation, as in most districts it is the local council that has the last say on what gets banned from it's roads. If your riding in the UK or Europe my advice would be to get some kind of public liability cover similar to what you would get to insure as a cyclist or motorist. Want to know even more? (ie: the specific tenets under UK (and EU) law? Extracted text from current (2014) UK and EU laws on the subject http://gyrodeck.blogspot.co.uk/2014/10/gyrodecks-and-uk-law.html
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