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Found 123 results

  1. My question is for riders who have tested the same model while fully charged with different sized batteries. Did the bigger battery increase acceleration, power, and/or weight?
  2. Toshiba's New Battery Tech

    An interesting advancement. 3 x capacity. 6 minute charge time. Charging as low as 14F temp. 5000 cycle lifespan to 90% original capacity. Sounds like Li Ion heaven... If it can be mass produced cheaply. https://www.cnet.com/roadshow/news/toshibas-breakthrough-battery-can-charge-in-six-minutes/
  3. Shutdowns generally end like this and are as painful as this looks. Notice how her feet are in space and can't push against anything to break the fall. If, like me, you ride slower than you can run, overleans and other mishaps can be recovered by stepping off but the physics is different in a shutdown and you can't just step off. It is like this. This guy demonstrates the technique for an unpowered dismount. From the moment of unbalance he is falling but he lifts his knee quickly enough to get his foot forward under his body and uses the forward momentum to lift him like a pole vaulter. He knows it's coming and the physics is not opposite to what he is expecting so a shutdown for you is more difficult than for him. My four ended in more pain than any other mishap. On many wheels battery protection has been prioritised over rider protection which can lead to a shutdown without warning. Wheels designed this way and fitted with low quality batteries can shut down at any time but even with good batteries they become dangerous as the batteries age. A rider is only likely to be aware of a rare and mysterious catastrophic failure on a wheel that was for a long time safe. Early battery replacement with good cells will avoid shutdowns or the battery can be modified. The graph below for an Airwheel X8 shows published battery data overlaid with testing data of an aging cell X (black), damaged cells X (grey) and a generic battery with different, damaged cells X (blue). The discharge rate for the X tests was 0.2 amps. The aging cells were still able to sustain a voltage above the tilt back/warning voltage long enough to warn a rider but the damaged cells went from above the warning voltage to below the shutdown voltage too quickly. The generic battery had a shutdown voltage higher than the warning voltage, making it unsuitable for this Airwheel X8 from new. A longer version of this summary is published elsewhere.
  4. This forum post has a ton of researched information and links about the interaction between a battery, ESC, and motor, particularly the role of the power-filter capacitors. The takeaway is that shortening the battery wires will always be better for the longevity of the electronics, as well as potentially improving performance. I may be wrong about this next part, but I also think that most EUC's would benefit from larger power capacitors (in the range of 4700-10,000uF; as opposed to the ~2,000uF found in most) I expect it would be better for the batteries to experience less "stutter" between charging and discharging while the unicycle starts and stops, and that the added buffer of power could actually help it handle bumps better, by providing an extra 10-15 amps in parallel with the battery pack. It'd also be important to pick capacitors with a low ESR or they won't be able to make use of their capacity. I'm considering adding a couple more on to my msuper v2, just on top of the ones already installed. Fortunately the roomy electronics compartments lends itself to this, compared to more "packed" unicycles.
  5. Some of you in So Cal may remember when @Marty Backe sold me his KS14C just before the fuse blew. Fortunately I was only a mile or two away from my spare wheel then, and not 8-9 miles like other mishaps. Wait! what if you are 6,7,8 miles away from help and you have a blown fuse? Thats what I was thinking, so I bought a pack of 25 fast acting 40amp mini blade fuses, took one out for the blown fuse and taped two fuses to the inside of the battery compartment as shown below. 🤓 If anyone needs a few fuses 40amp, let me know. I still got 23. Wait, 21 after I tape two more in the 500w kingsong too. EDIT- the fuses are that cellophane fuzzy thing just to the right of the single fuse just above the beige battery connector.
  6. I have been thinking about extending range in a non-invasive way, ie a method that does not require changes to the specifications of the wheel. Maybe someone can validate the following: a solar cell is embedded on the outside of the back-pack that I carry when riding my wheel. This charges a capacitor, also within my back-pack, that - when filled - drop-charges the charge into a spare EUC battery. When the wheel battery has no more charge, I click it out of my wheel and exchange it with the one from my back-pack and continue my journey. This battery swapping should take about 2 minutes in an idealised sense, ie far shorter than charging at a charge point. I understand that the solar cell specifications would not suffice the battery to get fully charged within the time it takes to fully deplete the original battery. For my Ninebot I would need 1.9A and 61V to achieve the desired power output and the current generation of solar cells do not achieve this. Even more so, the power output is influenced by ambient shading and the cell's angle, so very far from the theoretical maximum. Then also I would need to modify the Ninebot for it to be equipped with swappable batteries.
  7. Hello After more than a year working on my blog about the Mini, I decided a few days ago to monetize my blog, it reached more than 11,400 visitors from 115 countries. By joining affiliate programs with resellers, I choose spare parts and accessories for the Mini. I try to pay attention to quality even if it is difficult. I would touch a small percentage of a sale made, which will perhaps allow me to improve my blog, will see, I start with these programs. https://mini-j.jimdo.com/shop-guide/ It is therefore in total transparency that I announce the creation of a new site attached to my blog, called "Mini-J-S-G" (for the entire title: mini-j shopping guide) (cancelling) jojo33
  8. Hi, I am new to EUCs but have done some extensive research on them and am purchasing for my first wheel quite soon. I would like some input on whether or not there are incidents of EUC explosions and fire. I know hoverboards have been banned on college campuses around the US due to these incidents. Bans aside, I would like to know the frequency of such incidents compared to those of hoverboards. I know that the consumer population for hoverboards is/was larger than that of the EUC, and if that isn't the case, then there is much more widespread news coverage of hoverboard fire accidents. Any thoughts? Thanks!
  9. I've been looking all over the place online and can't seem to find a respectable place where i can purchase an extra/replacement battery for my Ninebot S2. Is there a place where I haven't looked? Link please? Thank you all
  10. Hello everyone! This is my first post since i joined in. I got this MCM4 340 WH, as this was my first unicycle, I didn't want to toss that much money ordering higher capacity version, cause I was not sure if I would enjoy this new mean of transportation . After one week of using this thingy I noticed It gives me much fun, however I would like to upgrade battery pack with another 340 WH. Asked my seller about the price of 340WH pack, he told me it will be 250 $ + 120$ shipping cost (the batteries are claimed to be 2900mah panasonic ones), the cost of 370 usd for the battery pack for me is quite pricy TBH, and I was wondering if it would be worth me to do a DIY battery pack. I am familiar with soldering iron, and with really basic knowledge of electronics. What is your opinion on 370 $ 340 WH battery pack, is it pricy or not? Do you know any trusted supplier, that offers whole battery packs for less money? Could you folks toss me some hints regarding DIY batt packs? Any advice will be greatly appreciated. Cheers
  11. Hey Guys I'm having my MSuper S+ ground-shipped from California to Montreal, Canada but it just struck me it will spend 5 days in the back of a FedEx truck that's not air-conditioned. Isn't that bad for the batteries?? It's a brand new, expensive wheel and I don't want to receive it with a battery pack that will have aged prematurely. I checked the outside temperatures of where it's at now and it gets to 35 degrees Celsius and more... @Rehab1, @Mono, @Marty Backe, @Hunka Hunka Burning Love? Tagging you guys because I see your names often on the forum and you all seem knowledgeable about this. Hope it doesn't bother you! Thanks
  12. I'm trying a new way to change the cells of my wheel. I bought these cases for 18650 because I do not have a soldering machine. Remove the cells and raise another possibility, which is charge them separately or for easy health check up. The first test without BMS: it works but low power, does not go up hills. Three of the cells are of poor quality, so maybe that's why. Next tests I intend to connect the BMS in the cases.
  13. After a ton of searching and reading I've concluded that battery capacity, longevity, and what we can do to preserve them has been the topic of many conversation on this forum. It is understandable too. After all the ability of the battery to safely deliver in an array of circumstances and environmental conditions makes the difference between a safe ride and a face-plant. Replacement power packs also seem to cost about the same as half of a new wheel! Ouch! I've been concentrating on what I can do to preserve the capacity of the battery in my newly ordered Inmotion V8. For the type of wheel the V8 has a relatively low capacity and so a restricted range compared to say the KS 16S but wins in the area of waistline and weight. I'm loath to start another thread when there are so many already but I have a few questions that appear to have, so far, been unanswered. Conventional wisdom on the forum derived through discussion and a heavy reliance on the information from Battery University (batteryuniversity.com hereafter referred to as BU) is that if you can get away with only charging to 80% and performing 50% discharge you will return you the best bang for your battery buck with regards to increasing the number of charge cycles by 4 or 5 times. BU reports that EV's such as the Nissan Leaf and Tesla models do this by charging to 80% capacity for a "full tank" and considering 30% to be an "empty tank". This maximizes charge cycles of the hugely expensive batteries and then by dynamically increasing this usage range beyond the initial 50% limit as the battery ages the vehicle is able maintain mileage specs over a number of years. BU considers a full charge discharge cycle to take a single cell's voltage from 3.0V (empty) to 4.2V(full). So following their suggestion of say an 80% capacity charge and only 50% usage to 30% capacity suggests a charged cell voltage of 3.96V and a discharged cell voltage as 3.36V. This is where I want help. The thing is, in the interest of safety I understand most EUC manufacturers artificially increase the "empty" voltage of a cell above 3.0V. From information I read on this forum from Jason Inmotion's cutoff voltage is 68V (over a 20 series 2 parallel setup) giving an empty cell voltage of 3.4V. With this in mind, ignoring any safety aspects of potential for restricted current delivery at low voltages, to achieve the best balance of capacity and longevity from my V8 battery I should charge to 80% (according to a 3rd party too such as the Charge Doctor, not the V8's battery indicator) cell capacity (3.96V) and then discharge until the V8 considers the tank dry (actual 3.4V) which in reality BU would consider still to be 33% actual cell capacity. Thus I consumed only 47% capacity. Do you agree with this conclusion? If I were to charge to 80% and discharge to 30% following the Inmotion battery indicator only for both levels then I'm guessing I'd actually be charging to 4.04V (80% of the 3.4V to 4.2V range, 86% of actual 3.0 to 4.2V cell range) and discharging to 3.64V (30% of the 3.4V to 4.2V range, 53% of actual 3.0 to 4.2V cell range) meaning I actually only get to use 33% of the real battery capacity vs the 50% I think I'm using. In another post on the forum in Jason's initial review of the V8 prototype he says that the V8 remained responsive and performed well right down to empty. So, if Inmotion keeps so much power in reserve and the wheel appears solid even at lower voltages I'm thinking of doing the 80% charge via Charge Doctor and drain to near flat as my usual routine to hit that balance of range and longevity (unless it is cold, then I’ll leave extra in the tank). What are your thoughts, first on my initial battery conclusions and then on my consideration to use the battery down to Inmotion’s definition of empty? I appreciate your input. P.S. If we can keep the discussion relatively layman that would be awesome!
  14. BMS specs for MSuper V3S 84v

    Hi, does anyone knows what specs are the standard bms for the 20s from gotway? I'm looking specifically at the max current rating that I need for an extra battery pack. thank you
  15. I´m making my NEW Battery

    Hi! Im making my new battery for my EUC and I answer questions. Im following the steps of this page: http://infoelectricos.com/bateria-electric-unicycle/ This will be 16S and will have 180Wh Thank you
  16. Hi everyone, I am pretty new to this kind of vehicles, the ninebot is my first one and I just love it so far. Learned to ride it in 3 days and making improvements every day (turning still needs some practise). But what I find somewhat bad is the low battery behaiviour so I just wanted to ask around if this is totally normal. I had it twice until now and it caused me to jump off the unit twice... at around 40% battery and 10km (6.2 miles) remaining distance, it starts beeping and is tilting back so hard that I feel like I'm about to fall of on my back. I totally understand that there needs to be some safety behaviour, but 1) I think 40% is way too early and 2) the tilting is too hard, it would rather cause an injury on an unexperienced rider than a safe stop. Is there any way to modify this? I would love to hear warning beeps at 40% from time to time and tilting / slowing down at 25% or so, this would give me the chance to finish my ride safely before the tilting occurs. Or are my values unusual? Will they improve with more total mileage / battery cycles? Thanks in advance
  17. Here is the parts list (total cost less than $10USD): 1. 2x flat nylon washers (about $1 for 6) 2. 2x flat steel washers (about $4 for 100) 3. 1x 6" section of 5/8" self-stick corner guard (about $3 for 4-8') 4. stubby screwdriver - BYOT See the video linked here and discussed here. The instructions are embedded in the photos. If you have any questions or comments, just ask.
  18. This thread and the companion tutorial (separate topic) are for all you Ninebot One die-hards out there, as well as new riders who have purchased, or still intend to buy One. I realise that many visitors to this site started on this model but have (long) since moved up to bigger/ faster wheels. I'm still holding out for a compelling reason to upgrade, mostly because the NB1E+ still meets most of my needs. It's reliable and durable, and for me, it was inexpensive (RIP @FORWARD california ). Even with two spare batteries, charger adapters, battery cases, spare rims, tires, tubes, torch/headlamp brackets, vinyl wrap, and four helmets, I have barely spent $1000.00 in the past year. That's real value for money. For the areas where I ride most (rough sidewalk, side streets with lots of road damage), it's nearly fast enough and well suited to the terrain, but the range with a single 320wh battery was a problem. So, over the last eight months, I purchased two spare OEM battery packs. I was inspired by the mods published by @SuperSport et al., but wanted a more secure solution. My implementation keeps the battery cover securely fastened top and bottom with all tabs intact. I have been testing this solution for the past month and know it to be durable and effective. A visual tutorial has been posted in the Mod section. Here is a short video demonstrating how quick and easy it is to swap out the battery now.
  19. Hello. Today i got a hoverboard from my brother. It was suppose to be for my birthday but he was in our country at the time. So what he said is that the hoverboard is great but when it's low on battery it doesn't show and today i was having fun with the hoverboard and the same happened. The hoverboard was out of battery and it stopped immediately the hoverboard started going upside down and i felt hardly on the ground (cause it's my first time on a hoverboard) and my knees hurt now :/ So what's the problem? My hoverboard is Kingstar's hoverboard black :/ And when i turn it on everything works fine when i step on it a circle kinda thing shows and the battery stays green all the time. Please help. Thank you.
  20. The battery of my unicycle died, so I decided to test it. It worked perfectly with Xiaomi's ninebot mini battery. I'll test the range on the weekend.
  21. I suspect when I carry a full backpack the regeneration of battery charge is highest ¿any clue to confirm that? Thanks
  22. Would love it if anybody could give me a clue on some things to check on my rockwheel, I pressed power button and got nothing, so I figured I just need to charge it. When I plug in the charger, the indicator light on charger stays green. I unplugged the charger and pressed power button, and I have a fading beep sound and charge indicator drops to empty almost immediately. Any ideas, I left it on charger for 30 minutes, light remained green on charger the whole time and when unplugging and then pressing power...same thing. Battery seems to not have charged more than the beeping and light that immediately goes off. By the way, the battery was great before and still was holding full charge.
  23. How To Replace an AirWheel Battery

    A simple tutorial for replacing the airwheel battery with a generic battery. I also show how to replace non-fitting connectors.
  24. In an effort to see how many miles I can get out of a single charge, I'm working on draining the battery of my inmotion V8 down to zero. Most of my rides are short, 20 minutes-ish, and roughly 2-4 miles, so it takes me all work week to get there. Anyway, I'm getting close, and just wanted to know if there are any warnings to look out for when riding at a low battery percent? I've been reading other threads, where other wheels get "tilt back" when they are getting low on battery or maybe start to slow down. Do these things happen with inmotion wheels too? When I finally get down to zero % will the wheel just turn off, leaving me with no stabilizing help? Thanks in advance for the help, I'm just trying to prepare myself a little so that I don't end up with a fantastic "face plant" story or worse ...
  25. I came across this summary of regulations for shipping batteries. Since this issue regularly comes up in the forums, I thought it would be useful to post the article and start a new thread to accumulate any specific experiences from forum members. Lithium-Ion Shipping and Travel Regulations: What You Need to Know
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