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rdalcanto

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About rdalcanto

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    Salt Lake City, UT

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  1. Help. All lithium ion cycles banned at USC

    Just an update: I got a letter back. They are basically skirting the fire risk issue, and just saying that he can't keep it in the dorm because there is a long standing policy of no "Motorized Vehicles" in University housing. I politely emailed back saying that a small unicycle that you ride between your lower legs is more like a skateboard than a Motorcycle, and should be treated as skates and skateboards. He can carry it all the way to his room, and never run it on the carpet. The fact that it has a small motor is irrelevant. What happens if they put tiny motors in the wheels of roller skates? Will those be prohibited from being stored in a room like someone trying to keep a Motorcycle in a dorm room? These people are so dumb, I can't believe I'm paying over $70,000 a year (tuition, room, board) for him to get "educated" there! Here is the policy: Motorized Vehicles. No vehicles or machines (e.g., motorcycles, electric scooters, jet skis) can be brought into, or stored in, University Housing Facilities. Skates/Skateboards/Bicycles/Scooters. The use of roller skates, roller blades, skateboards, bicycles, scooters, hoverboards, etc. is prohibited in University Housing Facilities. Trick riding and stunts create a safety hazard and are prohibited on walkways or in other areas within the vicinity of University Housing Facilities. Bicycles, scooters, etc. must follow campus parking enforcement policies. Hoverboards. Hoverboards are prohibited due to the potential for fire damage and personal injury.
  2. Help. All lithium ion cycles banned at USC

    Thanks for the help! But, the link to the CE certificate doesn't seem to work....
  3. Help. All lithium ion cycles banned at USC

    Made some changes to the letter. Thoughts? Dear Mr VuNguyen, My son Nicholas just informed me of the new USC ban on all Lithium Ion devices. This is obviously in response to the fires that have occurred with the cheap, defective hover boards that became popular a few years ago. I am deeply disappointed that someone has made the enormous mistake of assuming that all lithium ion devices are a fire risk. The cheap hover boards caught fire because of the low quality chargers and poor design of the motherboards that allowed some of the cells to over charge, causing them to catch fire. Not all lithium ion devices are a fire risk. Lithium ion batteries are in all the residents phones and computers. High quality devices like my son’s Inmotion V8 unicycle have sophisticated circuitry that monitor the charge state of every cell. Furthermore, the cells used are high quality batteries from LG and they are charged at a slow rate. In addition to that, he uses a device called a “charge doctor,” that has been programmed to stop charging when the batteries are around 80% charged, which prolongs their life, and eliminates the fire risk completely. The housing agreement said no hover boards, which is reasonable considering their history. But to ban high quality devices, such as high end electric bikes and unicycles, is a policy dictated by ignorance and fear, and it is embarrassing to see this at an institution of “higher learning.” In the not too distant future, nearly every vehicle in the parking garages will be powered by lithium ion batteries more than one hundred times larger than the batteries in the transport devices in question. This policy needs to be reconsidered using input from more knowledgable individuals who understand lithium ion cells, the importance of charge rates and charge levels, the difference between cheap and sophisticated chargers, and the safety features which are now standard in quality circuitry, so that the rights of the students are not violated in such a blatant manner. Sincerely, Richard A. DalCanto MD, PhD
  4. Help. All lithium ion cycles banned at USC

    Thank you, correction made in the letter.
  5. Help. All lithium ion cycles banned at USC

    Good thought. I also drafted this letter: Dear Mr VuNguyen, My son Nicholas just informed me of the new USC ban on all Lithium Ion devices. This is obviously in response to the fires that occurred with the cheap, defective hover boards that became popular a few years ago. I am deeply disappointed that someone has made the enormous mistake of assuming that all lithium ion devices are a fire risk. The cheap hover boards caught fire because of the low quality chargers and poor design of the motherboards that allowed some of the cells to over charge, causing them to catch fire. Not all lithium ion devices are a fire risk. Lithium ion batteries are in all the residents phones and computers. High quality devices like my son’s Inmotion V8 unicycle have sophisticated circuitry that monitor the charge state of every cell. Furthermore, the cells used are high quality batteries from Panasonic. In addition to that, he uses a device called a “charge doctor,” that has been programmed to stop charging when the batteries are around 80% charged, which prolongs their life, and eliminates the fire risk completely. The housing agreement said no hover boards, which is reasonable considering their history. But to ban high quality devices, such as high end electric bikes and unicycles, is a policy dictated by ignorance and fear, and it is embarrassing to see this at an institution of “higher learning.” In the not too distant future, nearly every vehicle in the parking garages will be powered by lithium ion batteries more than one hundred times larger than the batteries in the transport devices in question. This policy needs to be reconsidered using input from more knowledgable individuals, so that the rights of the students are not violated in such a blatant manner. Sincerely, Richard A. DalCanto MD, PhD
  6. My son is a freshman at USC. He was using an Inmotion V8 to get around campus. USC just came down with a no lithium ion device policy. No electric bikes, no hover boards, etc, allowed in the dorms because of "fire risk." This is obviously a response to the cheap hoverboards that caught fire in the past. A quality EUC with a charge doctor is hardly a fire risk. Any advice on how to deal with this? He is a music major and has to carry around a heavy saxophone across a large campus. The EUC was awesome.
  7. INMOTION V8 Bluetooth

    Can you turn off GPS/location services on your phone? I wonder if that would work....
  8. Battery issue when around 85% left

    If I don't stop the charge early using a charge doctor, both my V8s charge to 100%.
  9. Ninebot started malfunctioning

    Ninebot said the control board failed. They are installing a new one. I will update again after I receive the unit and test it.
  10. Charge Doctor for INMOTION

    I agree. That is why I made sure to note that my numbers are with the new 2.5A fast charger that Jason provides.
  11. Charge Doctor for INMOTION

    More Numbers. Plugged in to charge at 75.5V (only number I'm not sure about). At 79V, 64 Wh had gone in. Then it was about 25Wh for each volt increase. 80V - 88Wh. 81V - 115, 82V - 142, 83V - 166, 84V - 187. At the 2.0A charge rate cutoff that I set, total Wh in 221. So from 83V to cutoff was 55Wh, or 11.5% of battery capacity. So if you want to use the fast charger, and charge to under 90%, cutoff at 83V. One of these times I'll disable the cutoff and see how many Wh it will hold from 83V to 100% charge to get a more accurate feel for what percent charge the 2.0A cutoff and 83V cutoffs actually represent. 2.0A cutoff showed 84.9V
  12. Charge Doctor for INMOTION

    Sorry, I meant 58Wh. According to the CD, from around 35% charge according to the Inmotion App, to 2.0A cutoff, 280Wh total went in, which is about right, since 280Wh represents 58% of the 480Wh capacity, and I tried to not charge to full. If I ride again today, I'll double check my numbers.
  13. Charge Doctor for INMOTION

    I used the CD (charge doctor) today for the first time with my V8 and the 2.5A fast charger. I set the cut off for 2.0A. Between the time the CD showed 83V and the 2.0A cutoff, 58 (edit - Wh, not Amps) went in. Assuming that the batteries were still not fully charged at the 2.0A cutoff, then a 83V cutoff (when using the fast charger) would be less than 88% charge based on a 480WH battery.
  14. Ninebot started malfunctioning

    In that video, you clearly see the pedals tilting forward more before it finally tips over. This was not just a shut off. He pushed it too hard, and when the pedals started to lean, he should have known. It looks like the wheel was trying to catch up to him.
  15. Ninebot started malfunctioning

    I got an email back from Ninebot. They want me to send it in for warranty service. They sent me a label, but I noticed that it says bill sender, so I'm worried that FedEx is going to charge me when we drop it off. We shall see....
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