litewave

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About litewave

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Great Lakes region
  • Interests
    Ninebot One E+

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  1. Could not agree more. My first impression was that the I5 was an attempt to mimic the iPhone aesthetic. To me, the Apple-Ive design approach has gone too far, and the last thing I want is an EUC that reminds me of this. Spot on. If only EUCs came in beige. Unfortunately, I can't get past the ACM design, despite its performance. I think the blue and red shell colours on the MSuper V3 are appealing, but it still looks like a PLA-designed truck. Maybe Gotway will hire @SuperSport or sponsor a design contest?
  2. YOUR POST IS AWESOME! I just relived multiple flashbacks from the many happy years I enjoyed in Deutschland. Wish I had an EUC back then. Sigh.
  3. I have been using 1.4.0 since it was released about a year ago. Speed-tiltback for me begins between 23.5 and 24kph with battery level >40% , and becomes steep over 25kph forcing me to slow down. Battery-tiltback (aka limpmode) begins at 20% battery. I do get speed-tiltback at 20kph when the battery level drops below 40%, but it does not change (get worse) until limpmode kicks in. Speed gauge in the ninebot app shows anything over 20kph as red/overspeed, but tiltback behaviour does not vary except as noted above. Could this be just lack of familiarity/ misperception? Give it a month and see if you still see the same symptoms. For example, my NB1E+ made a scary grinding noise on a few random occasions in the first 3-4 months, but hasn't recurred since the machine was 'broken-in'. I should really upload that video someday ....
  4. This should be a poll! UpCurb: if >=3" step off, otherwise slow down, forward momentum required DownCurb: if >6" step off, otherwise slow down and decrease speed proportional to estimated drop-off, forward momentum required Up/DownStairs: only stairs at outdoor venues with long run, low rise Health: No worries about Ninebot, no worries about person since I'm wearing appropriate safety gear and cautious of traffic Recommend? Check with your GP and insurance agent first
  5. Well said, excellent post. Triple up-vote!
  6. I can see how that might seem to be a concern, but the excess laces are secured under the wrap-around bands above the ankles and should not be tucked into the shoes. The laces on the lower part are flat and take little to no space. I wear running (athletic) shoes when I ride, and these stabilisers actually make it easier to slide my foot into and out of the shoe. I've even worn them with dress shoes and had no problems with thickness. If one wears high-top hiking boots that cover the ankles then there could be issues. I wear them for safety and stability. When I don't wear them I really notice how vulnerable I feel to injury.
  7. These are the best ankle stabilisers in my experience and offer some degree of padding. I have been using them of over a year and swear by them. I have also posted about them several time before on this site. You could also insert medium/high density foam on the inside before lacing up. I used pipe foam insulation that was flattened for a while, and it worked really well.
  8. It's one of the main reasons I haven't purchased another wheel - I have yet to find an alternative that offers a quick, user-serviceable battery replacement/upgrade, or can be modded as easily – and has all the NB1E+ advantages (low total cost of ownership, durability, parts availability, etc.). So now, I'm pondering better thermal cooling options (the stock heatsink implementation is sloppy), and the possibility of whether I can safely 'overclock' the board with the Russian firmware mod to a P model ....
  9. Sadly, not an option for us EUC riders currently in the US, without using a friend or forwarder in the EU that can/will ship the upgrade cost effectively. In hindsight, I'm glad I did this myself, as I saved a lot of money; I bought the batteries at a deep discount (on sale - sorry no longer available ). The dimensions, form and structural integrity are more or less unaltered, and I only carry the additional packs when needed.
  10. >> See the video linked here and discussed here. There is an embedded link ^ to the video at the top of the original post that shows the technique I use. The cover sits very snugly under the hold-down screws with spacer and washer, and the bottom tabs snap into place at the bottom. So, to remove the battery cover, use a small stubby flat-tip screwdriver to depress the tabs at the bottom and force them in slightly to release. Do one side at a time and then pull the bottom out and away. The top tabs will slide out from under the screws with nylon spacer and flange washer. Reattaching is just the reverse. Slide the the tabs at the top at an angle over the battery and wires under the flange washers, press the cover over the battery, depress the bottom of the cover slightly to get the tabs into the compartment recess, and then give the bottom of the cover a firm nudge until it snaps into position.
  11. OK then, Rockwell GT16 now deleted from my wishlist.
  12. Here is the parts list (total cost less than $10USD): 1. 2x flat nylon washers (about $1 for 6) 2. 2x flat steel washers (about $4 for 100) 3. 1x 6" section of 5/8" self-stick corner guard (about $3 for 4-8') 4. stubby screwdriver - BYOT See the video linked here and discussed here. The instructions are embedded in the photos. If you have any questions or comments, just ask.
  13. This thread and the companion tutorial (separate topic) are for all you Ninebot One die-hards out there, as well as new riders who have purchased, or still intend to buy One. I realise that many visitors to this site started on this model but have (long) since moved up to bigger/ faster wheels. I'm still holding out for a compelling reason to upgrade, mostly because the NB1E+ still meets most of my needs. It's reliable and durable, and for me, it was inexpensive (RIP @FORWARD california ). Even with two spare batteries, charger adapters, battery cases, spare rims, tires, tubes, torch/headlamp brackets, vinyl wrap, and four helmets, I have barely spent $1000.00 in the past year. That's real value for money. For the areas where I ride most (rough sidewalk, side streets with lots of road damage), it's nearly fast enough and well suited to the terrain, but the range with a single 320wh battery was a problem. So, over the last eight months, I purchased two spare OEM battery packs. I was inspired by the mods published by @SuperSport et al., but wanted a more secure solution. My implementation keeps the battery cover securely fastened top and bottom with all tabs intact. I have been testing this solution for the past month and know it to be durable and effective. A visual tutorial has been posted in the Mod section. Here is a short video demonstrating how quick and easy it is to swap out the battery now.
  14. I thought you were using an advanced form of aerodynamic stabilisation. I like to hold my arms straight out to the side to pretend I'm getting lift for curious onlookers - and that's on a Ninebot !
  15. The aggressive styling and performance of the GT16 really appeal to me. If you could strike a deal with a reseller in the US for parts and warranty service that would definitely get me to buy.