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Showing content with the highest reputation on 08/04/2015 in all areas

  1. 12 points
    Most unicycles use bicycles' BMS which has a overdischarge cut-off circuit (Q1) to prevent the battery from discharging under the LiIon recommanded voltage. It's a feature usefull for off-the-shelf bicycles' batteries but for monocycles, it's 1) unecessary since the mainboard deals quite well with voltage warning 2) utterly, incredibly stupid since a cutoff by the BMS results in a faceplant for the rider. In other words, the wheel's designer prefers to protect the battery by hurting the user!!! Many many users have been harmed, especially when the wheel is cold (under 10°C), since the batteries' internal resistance increases and triggers the cut-off more easily. Of course, not all wheels are affected by such incredibly stupid "feature". AFAIK, Solowheel, Ninebot, Inmotion, ie reputable brands don't cut off. Gotway has early versions that cut-off but its recent BMSs don't, since the cut-off circuit has been removed. All others do, if not proven otherwise. So they are dangerous since the probability of cut-off will increase with cold weather coming and higher internal resistance due to natural battery aging. For prospective unicycle buyers, insist to have a safe BMS, ie without the cut-off. With enough pressure from users, the Shenzen genious will end up repairing this horrible blunder. For those stuck with an unsafe wheel, the BMS cut-off circuit MUST be shunted. When touching the battery pack, if you can feel under the shrinkwrap film the big mosfet transistors, it means the BMS must be shunted. The idea is to connect the battery's 0V (B-) directly to the power output (P-), bypassing the mosfets T1 responsible for the stupid cutoff : see the dotted green line in the schematics below. (B-) and (P-) are now standard markings on most BMS boards, so any BMS can be modified by laymen based on this principle. You can see immediately the improvement by testing the wheel with strong accelerations, no more cut-off, ever ! Enjoy and have a safe ride. Below are some examples of BMS shunt. Some remarks : - no need to disconnect the battery during the operation - for Airwheels, only dismount the half housing on the side of the battery (the side without the control panel). - T1 is usually composed of 2 or 3 or even more Mosfets, so it's distinctive from X1 usually made of just one mosfet. - On most boards' layouts, T1 is marked as Q1, X1 is marked as Q2 P.S. For more pictures and photos source credit of modders, see my original thread here : http://trottinetteselectriques.heberg-forum.fr/sutra13862_solution-probleme-bms.html#13862 TG BMS. The T1 transistors can be felt through the plastic wrap. The plastic is scapeled around T1. T1 is made of 3 paralleled MOSFET transistors. MOSFET's drain & source pins are shunted by a solder blob. Warning, avoid shunting X1 Mosfet. The plastic is closed by electrician tape. A smaller opening can be made, mine is unecessarily big. TG BMS, with CMS Mosfet Dolphin D5 BMS. 3 mostfets T1 are shunted. X1 at extreme right is NOT shunted. T1 and X1 are detected by measuring the mosfet' gate voltage (pin 1) : paralled mosfets have the same gate voltage.. Airwheel X8 BMS. T1 and X1 are not easily distinguishable. When in doubt, shunt the two middle Mosfets. Recent version Gotway BMS : no T1 circuit => no shunt to do. It's a safe BMS. Aliexpress generic battery BMS (Q1=T1 ; Q2=X1) Another Airwheel BMS, shunt directly B- to P- instead of shunting the mosfets Another generic wheel BMS. Shunt B- to P- SML160 BMS. Don't bother with shunting the mosfets. Shunt B- to P- instead. Firewheel BMS. B- shunted to P- by a big wire. Route the wire like in the picture to avoid adding thickness to the battery pack. Note that the B- wire here is red instead of the usual black color code for negative pole, an occurrence of lack of care (other Firewheel BMSs have the right color, ie black) which can be very misleading. Edit 2015/05/25 : Q1 & Q2 are ambiguous, replaced by T1 & X1
  2. 8 points
    We, WheelGo.com, have been the main European IPS distributor for about a year and half. The early IPS products, like the original 101, i200, & 111, had some pretty significant flaws but since 2012 (IPS were 2nd in the eWheel game, releasing their first product only a matter of months after Solowheel) their products have been progressively achieving a higher quality standards. In contrast to Airwheel, IPS have concentrated on single-wheel products, offering a range of eWheels with some decent specifications & performance. Historically they've taken their technical design philosophy from Solowheel, believing sub-20kph & pedal-tilt-back programming key to preventing over-speed cut-outs, at price that's about half that of the Solowheel S300/classic but with double the range. The IPS Zero is a departure from this conservatism, it will be interesting to see if the quality of the Zero holds up to the expectations. There have been so many disappointments with eWheels with high expectations in the past—witness Fastwheel Eva (pretty rubbish), Ninebot One (@14.2kg not very practical), WindRider (see FB thread...), that the odds of a perfect 30kph, sub-10kg eWheel, is very far from certain. That said, IPS do have the experience & resources to deliver on this ambitious design, only time will tell.... Below are some questions I put to my sales rep about the Zero & their responses. Response from IPS Sales Contact: The news about the new IPS Zero is getting a lot of attention on the Electric Unicycle forums. Would you be in a position to forward these questions to the engineering team? /IPS:Of course, thanks very much for your support. Until very recently IPS had considered going above 20kph a bit risky & prone to motor cut-outs. What have IPS done to minimize this risk? /IPS: Now the top speed of our unicycle is 30km/h, customers can adjust the top speed(15-30km) when riding about 50-100km, in order to protect customer's safe.Does the pedal-tilt-back prevent the user from riding beyond 30kph speed? /IPS: when the speed arrive about 24kpm, the pedal begin remind rider. The appearance of the Zero is breath-taking. Did IPS employ a famous designer to design the eWheel? /IPS: Haha, it's also our designer.There are some who say that it has many similarities in appearance to the Ninebot One. What does IPS have to say about this? /IPS: Every brand has it's characteristic, we are design the products according to the market demand.At the moment, the specifications are built around a 132Wh & 260Wh versions. The higher capacity version must contain 32 cells, with higher capacity cells, it should be able to reach 350Wh & beyond. Are there plans to also release a higher capacity version as well? /IPS: the capacity version of Zero contain 32 cells, if there is a demand for 350wh, we can make production, but in high quantities.Does the Zero have the BMS integrated into the control-board as all other IPS models have? /IPS: Yes, it does.The 800W power rating, is this the sustained power specification? /IPS: Yes, it is.Is each motor individually tested as other manufacturers are starting to do? /IPS: Yes, before we make production, every motor need tested by professional employee, please don't worry about this.How many hours of testing & QA have gone into the development of the Zero? /IPS: It's a long time, zero has tested 3 times, every time, when the sample is ready, our technical will test it and find the problem and then solve the problem, we all want make a different product for customers.
  3. 6 points
    I always dreamt about my Ninebot One looking a bit more like a KTM Motorcycle ... Orange/black really is the only option for me ... got the orange outer rings from my ninebot dealer, but i keept it safe for first week of driving But now its time to go black. bought the Black Plasti Dip Spray. Its a Plastic Foil you can spray on, and remove in one part (if necessary). more info at the end of the post. got 2 cans of plasti dip. one Black dull and a metalizer (appx 15€ each) and some crepe/painting tape for a few bucks. after unscrewing und cleaning with isopropanol use some swedish/finish Sony Action Cam manuals ... or ofc any old newspaper you have at hand first layer ... let each layer dry for appx 10-15 minutes ... and redo the layers as you please like 4-6 depending on how trigger happy you are. my black dull side of the wheel. on the other side i tried the metalizer. first I sprayed 3 layers black and 2 layers Metalizer but i sprayed a bit to much so it was too sparkly for my taste ... just put one more layer of black over it if its too much. The 6 places where you open your ninebot to change battery will probably loose the plasic paint first, maybe get the layers a bit thicker at these points (if you drive with a second battery) Not sure about how it looks like after some weeks of shoe contact/dust roads/crashes ... there are other Plasti Dip finisher too, like Glosifier or Perlizer ... all in all im very happy with the first novice attempt. but for sure anything is better than white. Im new to dipping, here some infos i found out ... Beside Plasti Dip there are other companies too, like e.g. Full Dip and many others. depending on your country/importer they have quite a huge collection of Colors. If you paint whole cars you can buy them per gallon, or just a spraycan which should be good for a few coatings. chameleon (color shift) dip https://youtu.be/hFrpJ1IYGH0?t=2m53s glow in the dark dip https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=blEI-64G6ZM or dip which changes color depending the temperature ... https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YfUAY41F5KE some of these advanced colors are already availabe in austria so they must be quite common and easy to get in other parts of the world, as we're quite a bit behind (1-5 years at most ) not sure about how crash proove they are but its not that much of a work to redo, and if something goes wrong .. just peel the paint off and its like new. at last a video on how to remove the plaint, like from a whole car - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0r7xvBSqhOE have fun ... muh!
  4. 6 points
    Lol ! Some times ago, I rode alongside a little girl on her bike. She told her mom : "he has a bike for poor people, he has just one wheel".
  5. 5 points
    I wanted to install my bike computer more permanently with a nicely hidden wire, so I opened up my Solowheel Xtreme partially; here is how to take it apart. (Disclaimer: this may void your warranty and/or break your wheel. Do it at your own risk!! Also, I just tried this out -- there may be a better way or order to it) 1. Unscrew the top handle and the screw in the rubber charger connector; after this you can remove the top black padding by shifting it upward (and slightly pressing in). (and ignore the bike computer ) 2. In the picture below, the red circles show where the black padding hooks went in. When putting it back, be careful not to catch any wires. Wow, very neat wire arrangement, even with markings. Most wires were also neatly attached with 'heat glue'. It may help to have a heat glue device yourself to re-attach if necessary (about $8,-). And we see the advantage of a double shell: the wires are on the outside and there are no holes exposed where dirt and water can come in (from the inside). Below, I also unscrewed the blue and red displays -- and unplugged the charger wire (part of it is in the black shell). 3. unscrew the 5 shell screws on the sides; I used a piece of tape to remember where each screw belongs. Note, only unscrew one side -- see next why. Actually, In the above photo I turned the wheel around which is not necessary. And you need to turn it again, such that the "CE" marked wheel pad is up. But first unscrew on both sides the 7 big screws on the vertical bars above the pads. Actually, if you only need access to the tire, then you should not remove the shell that contains the control wire and can leave in the 7 big screws on that side (the side that does not have CE label pad). 4. Now, carefully turn the wheel as the shell is loose now. Make sure the "CE" marked pad is up. Then carefully turn the top shell around the top of the wheel. 5. Again, note how I use tape to remember where all screws came from. Such neat design: the inside shell is completely dust/water proof -- no holes are exposed. Because we unscrewed only one side of the shell in the beginning, the square metal bars are now attached to one side of the shells: If we would have screwed off both sides, the bars would all come loose. 6. Now we are ready to remove the wheel -- but the other side has the thick wire that controls the wheel motor inside the wheel. Actually, this step should only be done if necessary since you must be very careful not to twist or bend the wire. Don't do this side if you are not comfortable with it. Anyway, we need to remove it carefully and not pull, twist or bend the control wire . The wire sits in a cutout in the shell and can be slowly extended; here is a view underneath the wheel: once you see it, you can slowly turn the wheel to its side and pull the wire out of the cutout (marked in red). and that is it. I must say I was tempted to open inner compartments and look at the battery and mainboard but in the end decided not to do it -- I enjoy my wheel too much at the moment and didn't want to break anything. This must wait for another time Putting it back is doing everything in reverse and being careful not to catch any wires. Also, when re-attaching the 7 screws on each vertical bar do this slowly and evenly such that they all go in lightly and are well-aligned. Only then tighten them up. Finally, don't forget to re-attach the charging wire when attaching the black padding again -- and make 100% sure red goes to red, and black to black!!!! Also, don't overtighten the two screws in the handle -- if you strip the screws you are without a handle... I did all of this to get the bike computer neatly tucked away; I'll show that in the next post
  6. 5 points
    Ok, here is how I installed the bike computer... First, I glued the sensor at just the right spot. I already tried this out when the wheel was assembled to ensure it is orthogonal to the magnet on the wheel and close enough; moreover, it has to be on the opposite side of the valve or otherwise there is not enough clearance. The bike computer is a CatEye Velo 9 (about $30,-) which is wired since wireless ones don't work due to RF interference. The sensor is glued using Amazing goop -- I tried super-glue before but these are too hard and brittle and break when doing off-road or curbs. The goop is more flexible and I hope it will stay on -- it did until now Then I used heat glue ($10) to neatly attach the wire on the inside of the shell. (as an aside: installing a bike computer may prove useless when the new blu-tooth app comes out but I wanted to have an odo meter right from the start; also, you can easily use tape too to attach the wire without doing any disassembly of the wheel: see the topic here) I drilled a tiny hole in the cutout for the wires for the blue 'display' on the Xtreme where I put the wire through (I removed the mounting station as shown later) Removing the mounting station: you need to lift the little contacts such that the 'prongs' come out of the wire underneath. After that you can install the wheel again and cut the wire just to the right length.I still left it a little too long and tucked away some wire underneath the blue display. Also, I messed up and ended up soldering the wire to the prongs in the end: Then, I drilled two tiny holes on the side of the mount, and attached it to the handle using a small tie-rip. Here is how the sensor sits: Anyway, I hope this helps; enjoy @‌admins: I guess this topic should be in 'mods & repairs' -- can you move it?
  7. 4 points
    Ok, now I have some experience in riding some of European countries: Sweden(Jönköping), Denmark(Copenhagen), Germany(Hamburg) and Netherlands(Amsterdam) and Finland(Turku&Helsinki). - The police did not stop me. At least in three cities I rode in front of police station. Some times I rode past the police. I ride with confidence, so maybe that helps. - In city streets 90% of brain capacity must follow the traffic so only go there when riding only takes 10%. - Sidewalks work but not when they are full of tourists. Riding among pedestrians is a lot of fun. Following several "targets" at the same time and estimating opening routes and irregular pedestrian movement, fun fun fun. - Bike lanes are good to use in Amsterdam and Copenhagen. Airwheel is slower than the fastest bicycles, so give way. It took me 2-3 days in a city before my Airwheel started beeping again of overspeed because I was too busy watching the cities. It was easy to leave my car far and then fetch the stuff I need with Airwheel. - One beer does not affect my riding too much. I can still ride, but have to be more careful. Never fell after "afterwheeling". Highlights: - Night ride in Amsterdam small streets, wow. Slaloming the poles dividing the sidewalk and road, wow. - Some central park in Hamburg and the routes near water, wow. - Walk-only streets in Copenhagen and balancing the wheel while going walking speed, fun. - Riding along the river in Turku, wow.
  8. 3 points
    @Tishawn Your capacitor is a decoupling one, it's used for filtering power noise and thus not strictly required. It can be removed without impacting the board. the fact of soldering it makes the board stop functionning may have many causes : - the capacitor is broken and acts as a short or partial short (low plausibility) - the coppers traces under and around the capacitor have taken some hit and your soldering has added some unseen shorts A thourough visual inspection, with close-up pictures may help to diagnose. Not easy to repair if you don't have adequate materials, like a magnifier, pointy soldering tips... so you can probably forget the capacitor. BTW, thank you for your very instructive picture of the BMS. In fact, as said above and I confirm, Ninebot has a dangerous BMS to that MUST be shunted. Grrr, come on, manufacturers, stop the stupidity ! Edit : I forgot to say, it's not true Ninebot One has not had power cut. Some on the French forum was victim but I did'nt attribute it to the BMS, thinking Ninebot as a big company could not have made a so dangerous BMS. Well, I reverse my judgment now.
  9. 2 points
    The 5000 Kilometer longterm test https://www.facebook.com/gotwaycn Has anyone informations about what parts until today had to be replaced?
  10. 2 points
    I ran across this the other day. Check out the multi-directional wheel - very cool. I worked with nearly identical multi-directional treadmills when I was doing military R&D about 15 years ago. Although I'm not sure I like the seat it looks really easy to ride. Top speed 6 kph, so not for you speed demons out there. http://asimo.honda.com/innovations/U3-X-Personal-Mobility.aspx http://spectrum.ieee.org/automaton/robotics/industrial-robots/041210-riding-honda-u3-x-unicycle-of-the-future
  11. 2 points
    Thanks Maarten No, I didn't want to open the compartments after all as I was worried to damage something -- don't fix something that works I am curious too though... I think it is very water/dust resistant; Only the compartments need to stay dry -- on the inside are the flat gray panels that seem pretty water/dust resistant on the seams. I cannot tell how much since I didn't unscrew those but it looks very solid. The only other place where stuff can get in is on the outside of the shells in the holes where the wires come from. Those holes are underneath the black top 'padding' -- it would be hard for water or dust to get there; The top-seam is covered by the colored panels/displays but that is not so important as there is nothing underneath the seam; just the wheel. The one part that worried me is the wheel control wire bundle which seems a bit banged up -- I'll post a picture later. (that has nothing to do with dust/water resistance though) Ah, right. I used super glue as that was a metal-metal bond and it seems to hold just fine. The sensor was attached with 'amazing goop' which is actually a very strong glue so I hope it will hold. I agree -- you can certainly not use hotglue for that!! If it still doesn't hold I guess I need to resort to epoxy although I am not sure if that doesn't get brittle also? I think hotglue is ok for the wire though as that is so small and light.
  12. 2 points
    @John Eucist I want to know exactly what the answer is, so let's get the brains on this one if we can. Here's a link to a comparison between King Song and Gotway electronics, done by @hobby16 Not sure if this helps with this particular question. http://hobby16.neowp.fr/2015/07/29/king-song-gotway-comparison/
  13. 2 points
    150 Fahrenheit = around 65 degrees Celsius, do note that the motor is being used near its rated nominal power (if Ninebots have 500W motors), 54.35V * 8.8A = 478.28W. I was under the impression that the max speed for Ninebot One E+ (not "normal" E) is around 24km/h = around 15mph. 65 degrees does sound a bit high, although probably not high enough to cause any damage yet. But it could be that a temperature protection has triggered and that's why the wheel is beeping and showing red lights. Edit: The battery picture also shows that the cells are LG DB MG1's, here's the spec sheets, if anyone wants them: http://www.sot.com.tw/images/11.pdf
  14. 2 points
    Balance is kept in several ways, not only turning the wheel. With low presure you will have more surface to contact the ground. High presure converts the wheel in a knife edge and more difficult to keep vertical without inclination. I have learned with low pressure (like the wheel comes from factory). When later I have increased the pressure, I have noticed instability. But anyway, now I prefer high pressure because the turns are easier and I have not problem with balance anymore.
  15. 2 points
    This is from another thread, second hand information from Shane Chen (the inventor of Solowheel):
  16. 2 points
    I agree, driving constantly left and right turns like when skiing can help to feel safer and keep being balanced unconsciously. It also worked for me.
  17. 2 points
    Just remember that batteries degrade slowly over time. The more often they are run to a low state of charge the faster they degrade so even if by some miracle it gets you home when you first get it, that won't last. I would suggest that an IPS 121 with it's 16" wheel and 350Wh battery would be much more suitable for a reliable commuting vehicle that will get you to work and back reliably.
  18. 2 points
    I thought I was never going to learn the thing. Every day for a week I would go out and try to learn to ride it by myself, with and without, the training wheels and strap. Then I read some advice which I'll list below..... but remember IT'S REALLY IMPORTANT to have a friend with you that doesn't mind exercising for a bit. I couldn't learn the thing for the life of me until they followed me and helped me balance. Remember a few fundamental things: It's almost impossible to balance when looking down, so always try to look straight ahead of you. It's ok to take quick glances down, but always try to remember to be looking straight ahead.The faster your going, the easier it is to balance. Don't go 3 mph and expect to balance. You can balance going 1 MPH when you get a hang of it, but as a beginner my biggest downfall was not going fast enough. I put on wrist, knee and elbow guards to give me more confidence going faster, luckily I never fell to the ground, just stepped off and grabbed the 9bot1 or let it fall.Try to relax your body, the more tense you are the harder it is to balance.Take the speed limiter off and set riding mode to 0. This made learning MUCH easier, because I could go faster and balance better. Don't use a wall or anything to assist you in getting on. It's much easier to learn to balance when you step on it without any assistance. If your left foot is on the pedal first and your stepping on with your right, then the 9bot1 should be leaning to your right a little. THAT'S OK. It should be leaning to the right. Don't try to keep it vertical to the ground or lean it to the left to compensate for the weight your about to put on your left foot (remember your taking your right foot off the ground to put it on the pedal, so all the weight is going to shift to your left foot). Don't be afraid to put all your weight down on your left foot when you step on. When you step on quickly putting all your weight on your left foot for that split second won't make you topple to the left, your right foot will step on the right pedal and it will straighten out the 9bot1. Lastly, and most important have your friend running behind you with both of their arms to your side to straighten you out if your about to fall. They should only touch you when your about to fall to straighten you out and help you keep your balance. The goal is to stay on it as long as possible each time. So just go where it takes you, that's why it's important to have a big open space. If you keep having to jump off because your about to hit something you'll never learn. By the 4th or 5th jump on you'll be able to balance without your friend and 20 minutes later you'll be balancing, turning, and taking speed bumps.
  19. 2 points
    The only way that the gyro can keep the wheel upright is through sheer power applied to the motor. It has no mystical ability to keep balance without using the motor. If you are slowing down because of the warnings it will be fine. If you are continuing to lean forward when you have reached the limit of the motor power what more can you expect it to do?
  20. 1 point
    I was thinking about what makes a review useful to potential buyers of electric unicycles, so I came up with a list of criteria that I feel consumers are looking for. I wonder if you would find it useful if reviewers would speak to how well the EUC they are reviewing measures up in each department: Ergonomics - How comfortable is it to ride. Does it conform to your body or does it jab into your shins and ankles for a nice helping of bruisetastic goodness?Weight/Portability - Lighter is better, obviously, but perhaps there are some mitigating features such as an extendable handle and wheels for trolley purposes.Performance - speed, maneuverability, battery life, responsiveness, etc.Safety - Will it dump you unexpectedly? Does it warn you if you're going too fast? Are there sharp, jagged edges which will tear you open?Longevity/Durability/Ruggedness - Will it last more than a week of casual riding? Can it take a beating if you have to bail and let it crash into a burning brick wall?Looks - Is it a sexy, sexy beast or would you be embarrassed to be seen in public with it?Bells and whistles/Extras - Does it come with extra goodies like bluetooth, speakers, missile launcher, etc?Price - Is it worth all that big cash money that you work hard for?What do you think? Are there other criteria which should be a factor in EUC reviews? --Richard
  21. 1 point
    I really like this wheel, but now I am worried Edit: I am unable to get the extra 'Jason McNeil' text out of the post :/, after Response from IPS Sales Contact:
  22. 1 point
    Don't know if I can attribute it to riding the EUC, but I rode a little less than 30km route today with my bicycle (which I haven't used at all since I got the 14" generic, so for about 3 months, and don't really exercise otherwise), and at least I'm not totally out of shape. I would have taken the EUC, but knew the route would be too long for the batteries, as I had to visit shops in different sides of town to get the final missing equipment (connectors, wires, hot glue gun etc.), and was half expecting that I'd be really out of shape and would have to ride slow, but no problem there, feel like I could have gone for a lot more (I used to ride 50-75km trips at one go just for exercise). Actually rode the last 10km part pretty fast, although don't know how fast, as the bike computer is currently attached to the Firewheel
  23. 1 point
    Someone yelled me at Copenhagen "What if somebody steals you that?" What to think? I did not stop to chat. But what if somebody steals your bike? Same thing when these things get more popular and thieves might actually know how to ride. Also there was a Segway tour for tourists in Copenhagen. I rode behind them and yelled "Oh my god I lost my other wheel, what do I do, what do I do now?!"
  24. 1 point
    @Jag_Rip - weird i've never had that problem at all. I've had the device overheat once but it was more of just slowing me down to 6mph and maybe 3 beeps. I think its related to the capacitor. I rode in to work this morning and noticed right away it went from a full charge down to 50% which is not normal for a 30 minute ride. I just brought my battery over to a repair shop i'm having them look at it. They claim they can fix it so we'll see. @esaj - I'm not sure what the right temperature is suppose to be but if 65 degrees celsius is not normal i'm wondering if it's related to my battery issue. I'll test when the new battery arrives(2 months from now apparently). I'm hoping to get my battery repaired today @dpong - yes that was the reason why i purchased the nineone bot - speed and safety for the rider. I'm now starting to think the safety is a bit much! I'm looking into the firewheel I need something faster. 14-15 in manhattan is a bit too slow. I want the gotway since the top speed is 40km but nobody is selling it in the US. And to purchase it overseas i'd have to wait a long time.
  25. 1 point
    not the body, but the wheel, that is, the feet, as they are the part directly connected to the wheel. And not to the right, but to the left (as you are falling to the left). So you might just try to turn the wheel under you while standing still and holding on to something (which is much harder though than doing it while you drive). I think that you can initiate this movement with your hip (i.e. above your hip), or in your hips, or with your knees, or with you ankles, but it might not help to try to be conscious about how to do this exactly.
  26. 1 point
    @esaj Thank you very much I will purchase and follow your advice and shunt. I ride this thing to work I dont want to faceplant due to safety measures for the device and not the rider...... I should be wearing full gear - Now and days i'm only where calv protectors since the so called cushion seems to hurt my calves. I greatly appreciate your advice!! @hobby16 - Here are the photos as promised. I hope these help. I was able to solder the capacitor back on - the weird thing is once I did that it wouldn't power on. Even with the charger it wouldn't turn on. I decided to remove the capacitor complete and now it's working - Im kinda worried as to why its working without the capacitor? Any ideas?
  27. 1 point
    buy a few valve extenders from an auto parts store so u can inflate and deflate without the need for taking the panels off. Apply the foam padding across the gray leg pads, but don't use the tape ON the gray pads directly as it will peel off the gray parts when u take it off. Run the padding horizontally across the gray pads and use sticky tape attached to the plastic left and right of the gray pads. You're gonna scuff the he'll out of the thing, so don't think that you won't. Definitely download the app from their website and NOT the Google play store. The one there is old and buggy. update the firmware via the app before u start practicing as the new firmware alters the behavior slightly. I suggest tire psi of no more than 30 while learning. Time time time time. Practicing and pouring hours into it is the only way you'll get better. The training wheels were not helpful for learning. They let u actually ride the thing but I personally don't feel that they HELP increase skill. Riding downhill is a dynamic all its own so include a downhill area in your practice circuit. That's all I can think of right now. yes I have successfully. I had to buy another extension and stack them to make it reachable.
  28. 1 point
    Let me try a hair-brained explanation of something I noticed. (Maybe a thought experiment - but something that helped me.) Bear with me. Forget about going straight for a moment. When balancing I'm always leaning a little to the left (or turning left maybe) - or else I'm leaning a little to the right (or turning right, maybe). So I'm always either 'balancing' to the left a little - or balancing to the right a little. Early on, I would often become unbalanced and have to step off of the wheel when I lost track of which way I was balancing/leaning/turning. When thinking only "I'm going straight" I was in kind of a "dead zone" and could not feel my balance as well. This is my own attempt at explaining what *I* was feeling, so others may easily disagree. But, something to try maybe is this: Don't try to go straight ahead in a straight perfectly balanced line, balancing neither left nor right. This is the dead zone. Instead, at least for some practice, try thinking I am balancing left now. Now I am balancing right. Always know which one you are doing. When you know which one you are doing, you can feel it. Meh, just a mind trick I used, especially in the beginning when I had to really concentrate and think about it.
  29. 1 point
    agreed, I am convinced too, and looking forward to it, even impatiently as it seems just to take so long... to see all this (and more) happen.
  30. 1 point
    Another session tonight. I realized that I forgot all my protective gears in my sport car is (at the garage, for repairs)...But I just can't resist. So I got cars out of my garage and started to practice... Unprotected. First, the feet position. Clearly, I started with a wrong position on the wheel. By placing my feet more forward on the pedals, I gained a lot of balance and stability. Now I can squeeze the wheel between my legs. Then, I stood by the wall and practiced little forward and backward movements for five to ten minutes. So, I could't resist and I tried some starts. A bit better than yesterday. While making a start, I scratched my left ankle. I decided to put my combat/shooting boots on. Whoa !!! Things went better. I was able to make my first 35 feet ride !!!! WhoooooHooo !!! What I noticed is that I always losing balance on the left side and I don't know why.... Thanks for your advices on that problem !! Bleu9mm
  31. 1 point
    Actually, I also like "eWheel" best. Sounds also slick, eco-friendly, and modern -- a bit like a 'laptop-wheel' or something let's hope Apple comes out with an "iWheel" soon and shows some slick design with magic Tesla batteries
  32. 1 point
    How about StEUc for Stand-up Electric Unicycle (as opposed to the sit-down varieties such as the SBU or RYNO)? It would be pronounced "stuke" which rhymes with "Luke". Or maybe even drop the last "c" for StEU and pronounce it as "stew"?
  33. 1 point
    This is really looking nice and I like the specs. I am still not sure if the ninebot fits my needs as it is heavy and big. I am fine with my 14", 9,2kg wheel (but I need a more powerful one). This IPS Zero could get very popular... Manu
  34. 1 point
    If you're talking KM traveled, then the motorcycle take first-place, with those mobile-phone glued zombies (aka pedestrians) in a distant second...
  35. 1 point
    Dear All, I am Thomas from High'tems in France. We have E+ at 999€ included all tax and transport cost by UPS from our warehouse. Warranty is 24 months. If malfunction tansport cost at our charge. We have all parts on stock. We have also Ninebot One E at 849€ with the same conditions. Thomas
  36. 1 point
    Cool. How do you ditch to keep it in a box? Open it up quickly.
  37. 1 point
    Depends a lot on what kind of driving practice. If you drive less than 15 km / h on the street, do not necessarily have anything special. But if you push hard and doing tricks, as well as times of difficult places, you need more protection. Off-road driving speeds 20-35kmh principle, in my opinion, nothing is too much.